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ARRL Ohio Section Journal

The Ohio Section's official news source. Keeping amateur radio operators around the world informed of the latest amateur radio news.

  1. In this issue:

    -> DAYTON HAMVENTION NUMBERS
    -> WINLINK AND FIELD DAY
    -> FIELD DAY PICTURES AND MORE
    -> THE TECHNICAL COORDINATOR
    -> AFFILIATED CLUB COORDINATOR REPORT
    -> THE SECTION EMERGENCY COORDINATOR
    -> THE PUBLIC INFORMATION COORDINATOR
    -> THE SECTION TRAFFIC MANAGER
    -> OUT AND ABOUT
    -> ARES TRAINING UPDATE
    -> OHIO RESPONDS
    -> LET'S TALK
    -> THE OFFICIAL OBSERVER COORDINATOR
    -> SPECIAL EVENT STATIONS IN OHIO
    -> OHIO HAMFEST CALENDAR
    -> MY FINAL

    ****************************************************

    DAYTON HAMVENTION NUMBERS

    Ok Guys and Gals,

    You, like me have been waiting for some time now on the attendance numbers from the Dayton Hamvention. Well, my sources tell me that the attendance was.....   29,296!!

    Wow.. That's really great, and I'm sure that the folks at DARA are proud of those numbers too.. Congratulations go out to everyone that had a part in making this Hamvention the greatest in the country!!

    ****************************************************

    WINLINK AND FIELD DAY
    (from Bryan kc8egv@winlink.org)

    The OHKYIN ARS will be running a WinLink station as part of the 'free' VHF/UHF station. After some research being done with the ARRL, it was agreed that the rules allow Radiogram messages to be sent via WinLink, as long as the message is sent via RF in or out of the Field Day site. The same requirement as a voice message if you think about it.

    If anyone else wants to join in on the WinLink fun during Field Day, send me a message using WinLink Express and a Radiogram >> OR <<  use an ICS-213 templated message. Be sure to update your software before sending messages so your templates are up to date.

    If you can't send messages via RF from your Field Day site, you are still welcome to send a message to me so our club can receive credit for it.

    I will be checking for messages in the WinLink system from Saturday at 14:00 local to approximately Sunday at 10:00 local. Please send your messages during this time for credit and I will reply to you.

    If you want to test our your Winlink messaging between now and Field Day, feel free to send me a test message and I'll respond as I have time. This sure beats sending several messages via voice!

    I hope to connect with many of you during Field Day so we all can get NTS bonus points.

    73!

    Bryan - kc8egv

    ****************************************************

    FIELD DAY PICTURES

    This is a great time for taking pictures of your Field Day participation for sure. I will be out and about with my camera, but I need your help too. I need you to take pictures and send them to me. I will have a gallery setup on the website to display everyone’s Field Day pictures as I get them. Please, take a lot of pictures of not only the equipment and food, but also of everyone having fun at Field Day too. Send those pictures to: n8sy@n8sy.com

    I will be taking some of those pictures and placing them on the next Ohio Section Banner..  Showing all of us having fun and participating is what makes this banner so great!

    *-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*

    FIELD DAY MESSAGES – AN EASY 300 POINTS FOR SURE – PLUS MORE

    Each year, hundreds of Field Day operations try and find every advantage to earn as many points as possible. But many overlook bonus point categories that can add a reliable 300 points to your group score: the group participation NTS message to the ARRL Section Manager, the W1AW Field Day bulletin, and the NTS traffic handling bonus.

    Each Field Day group should generate a formal NTS-style piece to their ARRL Section Manager and Section Emergency Coordinator. This message should include the group’s name, their location for Field Day, and the number of ARES members participating in the event. 

    NOTE:.. Since I will be on the road visiting a number of sites for Field Day, please send these pieces of traffic to me via OSSBN –www.ossbn.org  for details about the net, or you can find them on (3.972.5MHz.) 

    This may mean that your group may have to take one of your stations away from operating normal Field Day contacts, your group is awarded the 100-point bonus for taking the time to pass this piece of traffic. To claim this bonus, you must submit a copy of the formal message with your Field Day entry. Note: The Section Manager message does not count as one of the 10 NTS messages for bonus points.

    For more details about how to handle these messages, please go to: www.arrl-ohio.org/FD_Message.html  orwww.ossbn.org/FD_Message.html

    FIELD DAY BONUS POINTS OPPORTUNITIES

    Don’t forget that there are two additional ways to earn extra points for your group's efforts. One is the "Safety Officer" position and the other is related to promoting your Field Day via "Social Media."

    Safety Officer..  is a critical concern during Field Day. Every year the Field Day packet contains a Safety Check List that all stations should follow. All Class A entries can earn an additional 100 points by designating a member of their group as "Safety Officer."  This person must verify that all safety concerns on the Safety Check List have been adequately met.

    The Safety Officer position is to be taken seriously. Real oversight is required; appointing a Safety Officer, affirming that all items on the Safety Check List have been completed properly, must be included with a groups Field Day entry with all other supporting documentation.

    Social Media..  There have been many PR and publicity bonus points available in Field Day for a very long time. The addition of a social media bonus makes promoting your Field Day event even easier than before.

    Social Media refers to any online platform that promotes being connected with friends and family.. Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, Pinterest and LinkedIn are five examples of allowed Social Media platforms.

    The Social Media bonus points will only apply on recognized social media platforms and NOT your clubs website.

    2017 OHIO FIELD DAY PROCLAMATION ON-LINE

    Just wanted to let you know, if you haven’t already found it, that you can view and print the governor’s Proclamation for the 2017 Field Day. Go to: www.arrl-ohio.org/SGL/sgl.html to get your copy for your Field Day site. You can also find a sample Press Release for your Field Day activities as well.

    Thanks to Bob Winston, W2THU our State Government Liaison (SGL) for getting the governor to take time out of his busy schedule and getting this Proclamation for us.

    ****************************************************
     
    THE TECHNICAL COORDINATOR
    Jeff Kopcak – TC

    Hey Gang,

    Another Dayton Hamvention is in the books.  Yes, despite the arguments – 'it's not in Dayton anymore blah blah blah' – the program guide still says “Dayton Hamvention.”

    My dad, N8ETP and I have been attending Hamvention consecutively for the past 3 years.  I've gone down a couple years by myself, stayed at numerous hotels in the area, bummed rides off friends, taken bus trips, and even stayed at the dorms on the University of Dayton's campus.  Returning back each year quickly brings back memories of routes in and out of the arena along with familiar eating and travel destinations.  The layout inside rarely changed.  You knew where the prize booth was located along with favorite dealers, vendors, clubs and organizations.  The entire back parking lot was the flea market.  There was the usual selection of arena eats – burgers, nachos, hot dogs, pizza, and ice cream – that often benefited a local school or community organization.
    Now, everything is different.

    The Hamvention committee should be commended for the monumental task of moving the event from the now closed Hara Arena to the Greene County Fair Grounds in Xenia, Ohio within 9 months.  I can't even imagine what it takes to setup an event that draws 25-30,000 people let alone move it to another location quickly.

    Buildings at the new location are less than 20 years old.  They were rebuilt after a tornado hit the fairgrounds in 2000.  RV parking and an on-site bathhouse were available.  There was ample parking on the grounds and at three remote locations with shuttle transportation.  Quite different compared to the dilapidated arena where there always seemed to be a haze indoors due to the lack of air flow, falling ceiling tiles with mold and probably 30-year-old dust, and septic system with a propensity to explode.

    Atmosphere of was more “fair” than “convention” because vendors and exhibitors were spread out over separated buildings (themed Maxim, Tesla, Marconi, and Hertz), displays were in outside tents, and an abundance of food trucks and carts similar to that of any county fair was seen.  More eating area was needed compared to the amount we were used to at Hara.  There were long lines and the limited seating, for maybe 50, filled quickly.  I had an enjoyable standing lunch with members of the Wood County ARC.

    If you were lucky enough to be there Friday, you were greeted by the “Welcome to Xenia” signs quickly followed by break lights and miles of cars waiting to get into the fairgrounds.  Even the shuttles were stuck in traffic.  The reason was discovered once we arrived.  Cars were being parked at a rate of nearly one-at-a-time.  Time was wasted waiting to see which isles were full and which ones had room for additional cars.  This was quickly remedied Saturday as cars were being parked in multiple locations at once, effectively eliminating the traffic issue from Friday.  Scratch that issue off the list.

    In general, Hamvention is smaller.  I knew this going in from vendors indicating they weren't going to have the space they were used to.  Vendors made the most of it and generally seemed to work.  As a result, vendors couldn’t bring the usual amount of stock.  Show specials for things like the very popular TYT MD-380, you could purchase one but couldn't leave with one.  In one case, it would be shipped and arrive the following Tuesday.  Kinda a bummer as many hoped to leave with a new toy.  Vendors in the outside display tent got washed out with storms that rolled through.  Not good for computers, sensitive radio equipment, and video cameras I saw out there.  I was not able to find Mendelsons – a long time staple of the Hara flea market.  I heard others asking too if they had been spotted.

    Lastly, mud.  The flea market and parking lots were in grassy areas, or at least started out that way.  Friday wasn't bad as the ground was soft in a few areas of the flea market.  Saturday morning, with the help of overnight storms, large farm tractors used for transporting patrons were contributing to the problem of turning the grassy parking lot into a mud pit.  After everyone took shelter for even more storms Saturday morning, allll bets were off.  The flea market isles were mud tracks.  A good pair of rain boots were needed to help manage.  It was funny watching rented scooters trying to manage a couple inches of mud.  Not wanting to get our clothes dirty, we headed out about 3pm on Saturday and learned the parking lot suffered the same fate as the flea market.  The committee, I think, anticipated this because they had rope and skid loaders for cars that needed assistance.  We exited without assistance but still need to get our car washed twice to get MOST of the mud off.

    All-in-all, I'll call it a success.  Out of the things that could go wrong, these issues were the harder ones to plan and tackle.  The traffic issue was resolved the next day.  This shows they are already learning from the problems that came up during the show.  It was a suitable location for a venue change in 9 months.  Anyone who is thinking of going next year, you should make your reservations now.  The camaraderie, meet and greets, and running into fellow hams was as exciting as ever.  If any of the planning committee is reading, I have an idea for a bigger location… just sayin'.

    If you didn’t catch the June 7th episode of Ham Nation, Michael Kalter – W8CI was the featured guest for the Hamvention recap.  They talked issues and plans for the future.  If you think they’re only working on minor changes, you’d be wrong.  More:https://twit.tv/shows/ham-nation/episodes/303

    There wasn't a ton of major announcements at Hamvention.  Some of the more technical things I did pick up on:
      * ICOM had a prototype of their latest direct-sampling SDR transceiver, the IC-7610.  It resembles the IC-7600 with the SDR features of the IC-7300.  They're looking at late summer availability once approved by the FCC.

      * Kenwood featured their TH-D74 APRS & D-STAR 144/220/430 HT.  This radio has been out for some time but were touting D-STAR has seen a resurgence because of this radio.  I don't think people are going to start putting up D-STAR repeaters again because of one radio.  Kenwood is looking for feedback from customers to see if there is interest creating an equivalent mobile radio to the D74.

      * 220 MHz DV access point (DVAP) for the D74 and 4 new “DV AIR” devices by Robin AA4RC.  AIR series are embedded devices supporting the DV Dongle, DV3K, and DVAP eliminating the configuration and need of a Raspberry Pi to make those devices portable.

      * Yaesu had their new DR-2X repeater on display.

      * Flex Radio has four new SDR radios.  Two models integrate the Maestro control panel (touch screen and controls) into the radio.  If you ever thought 'real radios have knobs,' there you go.

      * Just before Dayton, Connect Systems shipped the first batch of CS800D DMR dual band mobile radios.  There is a waiting list for the next around assuming no issues with the first.  Check the Connect Systems store and look for the 'CS800D waiting list' option for instructions.

    The 300th episode of Ham Nation was the week before Dayton.  I attended the Ham Nation forum which was still standing room only in the new room.  I got to be apart of the forum promoting the D-STAR After Show net.  Show hosts and net controllers were invited to the ARRL booth afterward to get our picture taken with Tom Gallagher – NY2RF.

    With the highlights and festivities around Dayton Hamvention, the special event commemorating 300 episodes of Ham Nation kicked off the following Wednesday with episode 301.  For one week, show hosts, after show net controllers, many with 1 x 1 special event call signs where on the HF bands and digital modes.  With nearly an estimated 10,000 contacts made, digital didn't get the numbers we hoped.  There were pileups for the nets but quickly dropped off for the remainder of the week.  The idea for digital was to involve more hams that don’t have privileges or means for an HF setup.  Those that participated were happy digital was involved.

    If you participated in Ham Nation 300, send your QSL card with an SASE to the stations worked.  A commemorative card will be returned.  The logs are being compiled for the certificates which will be available in the future, catch the show for details.  Lastly, the points challenge is going on until August so you still have time to get involved if you missed the special event stations.

    Last month, I started out with an introductory series on terminology used in ham radio DMR.  I finished a second writeup on programming a code plug from scratch.  Programming is focused around the TYT MD-380 but should apply to other CPSes too.  It covers a fictitious repeater example, hotspot configuration (even for the DV4Mini), and simplex operation.  Check it out and get familiar with your DMR radio by programming it! http://www.k8jtk.org/2017/06/11/dmr-in-amateur-radio-programming-a-code-plug/

    Not at Dayton but shortly after, I saw a hands-on review of the new Tytera (TYT) MD-2017 DMR dual band hand held on Ham Radio 2.0.  You heard right, a DUAL BAND DMR HT!  I was excited for this radio even though there are not many VHF DMR repeaters – unless you're in New England it seems.  The review indicated the channel selector knob was replaced with a Blackberry Curve-style roller trackball.  My enthusiasm quickly deflated.  WHY??!!  I had a BB Curve.  The trackball was a nice idea at the time but it was overly sensitive, got gummed up quickly – especially in a dirty environment, was hard to clean, and had to be replaced about once a year.  The radio itself is similar to the MD-380 but differences include programming cable, software, code plugs, and a VFO.  An MD-380 code plug won’t open in the MD-2017 CPS.  I’m sure a hacked program will be available to load code plugs on different radios.  Seemed like a good radio otherwise, though I won't be getting one.  Ham Radio 2.0 Episode 99: Debut of the TYT MD-2017 Dual Band DMR HT:http://www.livefromthehamshack.tv/2017/05/29/episode-99-debut-tyt-md-2017-dual-band-dmr-ht/
    The next big ham holiday, Field Day, is right around the corner.  Get out and join your club or find a club to join if you’re not a member of one.  It’s a great time to bring friends and get them excited about ham radio.  Hams that come out get bitten by the bug to expand their station or learn a new mode.  Check the Field Day Locator for operations taking place near you:http://www.arrl.org/field-day-locator.  Sending 10 messages over RF from your site gets you 100 points – including Winlink messages.  I love to receive messages about your setup, stations operating, or social activities taking place.  These can be sent via the National Traffic System (NTS) or Winlink – K8JTK at Winlink.org.  Winlink post: https://winlink.org/content/field_day_send_11_winlink_messages_200_points

    With July around the corner, the 13 Colonies special event is coming up (http://www.13colonies.net/) along with the RAC Canada Day contest (http://wp.rac.ca/rac-canada-day-contest-rules-2017/).
    Thanks for reading and 73… de Jeff – K8JTK


    Note: Ham Nation pictures taken by Tom – N8ETP.

    Thanks for reading and


    73… de Jeff – K8JTK

    ****************************************************

    THE AFFILIATED CLUBS COORDINATOR
    Tom Sly, WB8LCD  - ACC

    Greetings to all from your new Affiliated Club Coordinator! 

    First and foremost, I would like to say “Thank You” to SM Scott – N8SY for the opportunity to serve you in this way.  Same with your outgoing ACC John – KD8MQ.  I'm amazed to see all the places they've traveled to in the last couple of years, and all of the things they have done to support the ARRL, and ultimately you and I.  They both deserve your admiration and respect, and I hope that my contribution will be worthy of the groundwork they have laid. 

    I feel that my job for the ARRL is an important one.  Their official listing has several bullet points of what I'm supposed to be all about, but let me tell you in my own words what I think they mean and how I will be approaching the position.  First let me point out that in my view, the ARRL has two distinct and separate operations: 1. The National Organization and 2. The Field Organization.

    The work of the National Organization is the serious stuff like interacting with governments on a worldwide basis, lobbying all for the benefit of the hobby.  They do an outstanding job on our behalf, and Ham Radio exists today because of the ARRL's efforts to protect us from those who would like us gone (specifically industry who would love to have our frequency allocations).  The larger their constituency, the more clout they will have with their lobbying efforts.  This is good for us!

    The work of the Field Organization is to make sure YOU have FUN with your hobby!  If you have fun, you will naturally bring other folks into the hobby who also want to have fun.  Clubs make it easy to have fun with any new activity because you can leverage off the knowledge of the other members to make you successful quicker, and the more you have success with any endeavor, the more fun it's going to be for you. 

    My job is in the Field Organization.  It's basically to help you all have fun with your hobby through your involvement in your clubs!  Of course, there will be some natural spill over to the National Organization as hams support the group that keeps their hobby viable.  So, we all serve each other, but if the participants in any hobby aren't having fun – one by one they will all drop out and there won't be a hobby anymore.  So I do view my job as important to the survival of the hobby I call my own.
     
    There are lot's of activities to participate in with Ham Radio, but all of them require you to get on the air!  Making Q's is one of the most fun things you can do in our hobby, that's why it's called “Ham Radio!”  (Yeah, I know it's really called Amateur Radio.)  So starting this new position for me in June gives me an easy topic to talk about where you, as part of your club, can have FUN with Ham Radio – Field Day!  If your club doesn't show up for Field Day then you are missing out on one of the most Fun and participated in events in Ham Radio (in North America, that is).  If your club doesn't do Field Day than find another club that does and ask them if you can become an “honorary member” for the weekend and help them out.  Get a couple of your friends together and participate.  Get on the air from your home stations and give out Q's.  Now matter how you participate, you'll be having fun and making it more fun for everyone else, too!  Chances are good you could work all states in a weekend!

    Remember, Field Day is NOT a contest!  But, everyone keeps score.  Everyone's goal should be to do better than you did in prior years.  That might mean you try a new location, use different antennas, try different bands and modes, get more people involved in your operation, learn about propagation.  Whatever it is, do what it takes to get better!  (Remember now, it's not a contest, but it sure is fun if you're winning!) By keeping score and good records of your set-up, you can look back at your operations and see what may have been the key factors in doing better or worse than prior years.  You can also tell how you do in relation to other clubs.  But you can't call it winning – because it's not a contest!  (Unofficially now, since there is a score, you can win.  And to quote my friend Ed – K8IV: “What could be more fun than winning?”)

    So, if someone you know says they're not operating field day, and then gives you some lame excuse as to why  (most commonly you'll hear “we did that 30-40 years ago”) you need to shake them up and get them out there!  The new hams need the experience of the “Old Timers”.  And even those “Old Timers” can learn a few things from the new guys.  Some clubs are all business at Field Day, and there are others who make it a weekend of socializing on/off air.  Find a place that suits your style and get out there!  Have some Fun!

    Now that's the easy part.  I'll probably key in on having fun for the next couple months, but, the tough stuff is coming.  Running a successful club program does not happen by accident.  It needs to involve quite a few dedicated leaders who are going to work awful hard and spend a lot of their personal time doing it.  You need to thank those guys!  A simple “thank you” will go a long way, but, the best way you can tell them you appreciate what they are doing is to SHOW UP!  Club leaders can get pretty discouraged when they work hard at putting a program together and then only one or two show up.  They won't put as much of their personal angst into it next time and from there failure becomes a self-fulfilling prophecy.  Please, don't put your club leaders in that position.  You are one of the most important members of your club, and you can make a big difference in what happens there.  Show up, be positive, help where you can.  It only takes a couple of you doing that to make a big difference in a club!

    Hope to hear you on the air during FD.

    73, de Tom  wb8lcd

    ***************************************************

    THE SECTION EMERGENCY COORDINATOR
    Stan Broadway, N8BHL - SEC

    We’re in it up to our boot tops!
    ARES in Ohio is in the midst of its active season. There are a lot of events- marathons with BIG crowds, large bicycle rides (Pan Ohio, GOBA and more) and even a national level Ironman. In addition, there are local parades, community events and more to keep even the modest counties active.  For some, this can get old… the ‘been there, done that’ syndrome. But remember why we do these: first, to serve our neighbors and our communities! Second, because it’s great practice for transferring our communication abilities over to a real emergency situation. And there’s a new ‘third’: the harsh reality is we need to have eyes and ears at large public events to help safety forces with situational awareness.  In other words, look for weird stuff and report it.  These events can also serve as field tests for new technology- digital radio, video, etc., as we step up to new levels in communications. Most of all, they provide the opportunity for the experienced guys to lead by example and show how concise, professional communicating happens.  EC’s- get your local LEO’s to provide terror awareness training, brush up on what to look for.  

    EC’s you should be always on the lookout for activities in which amateur radio can be a benefit! The best way to keep your volunteers interested and excited is to ~stay active!~

    How bad is it?
    One item moving up the list in FEMA and OHEMA circles is ‘rapid damage assessment’. Sounds like something we can provide, right?  Seek out some new training on the rapid assessment side of damage assessment for our people!  It’s more critical than ever that EMA’s provide fast estimates of damage in order to bring in state and federal help. Your EMA Directors should be able to help get this rolling for you!

    The votes are in!
    I have had conversation with a few people who are very interested in applying amateur radio to helping at polling places during elections. Marion County did that with good success last year, and a couple elections officials have indicated they’d help running this up to be a statewide initiative if we’re up for that.  If you’re interested….or if you hate the idea….please let me know your thoughts before we proceed.

    Get Registered!
    Not for voting (you oughta be involved in that as a citizen) but for recognition by the state as a volunteer. Scott has circulated information about our new relationship with Ohio Responds- a database for registering volunteers. This is the clearinghouse to make certain we’re covered under Ohio’s liability protection statutes.http://www.arrl-ohio.org/ohio-responds-page.html  gets you the background, and a link is there to register. MAKE SURE YOU HAVE ALL FOUR FEMA COURSES FIRST!!! You will not be included without them.  There is also a question if you’ve had a background check in 5 years. It doesn’t affect your ability to register, it’s informational only at this point.  Read Scott’s page completely before registering… take the time now to jump over and get in the database!

    Field Day!!
    It’s that time of year again- for one of the most fun activities I can think of in amateur radio. For groups that have been doing it over the years, or groups that are just sitting on the side with their toes in the water (operating only a few hours or under limited circumstances) it’s all fun. Just like any other activity in ham radio, the first goal is fun and fellowship!  Operating the radio in a concentrated fashion is excellent practice and still fun!  Don’t forget the underlying purpose: to be able to provide all-else-fails emergency communication.  Have fun, be safe and try something new this year!

    The Sarge is alive
    You may remember that the Ohio EMA station, W8SGT (The Sarge) has been severely limited since last July’s remodel. We have been down to two HF rigs, operating out of the FEMA EMP-vault (lovingly referred to as the ‘meat freezer’) or out of someone’s home. A new room was constructed right on the EOC floor, and nice furniture was installed. The hangup has been antenna work- and now we’re close to having that complete. Another workday or two should see the Sarge alive and well, with big signals thanks to our new FT-1200’s and ALS amps! Thanks for your patience in the meantime- it’s been a long time but we’re really close to being finished!

    SET
    Planning is underway for this year’s Simulated Emergency Test- where we can put all this practice to use. This year has potential for being a ‘big-time’ operation!  So stay tuned!


    You can view the SEC’s monthly reports on the website.. http://arrl-ohio.org/SEC/default.html


    73, Stan, N8BHL

    ****************************************************

    THE PUBLIC INFORMATION COORDINATOR
    John Ross, KD8IDJ - PIC

    From the PIC

    The deadline for entering the 2017 Newsletter Contest is just about here…June 30th!

    All entries need to be either postmarked or emailed by midnight June 30th to qualify.

    So far…WOW! …a lot of recent entries the past two weeks by snail mail, email and web posting so this year should be great.

    If you have any questions call or email ASAP so we can make sure you’re in.


    Dayton Hamvention 2017


    It’s been about a month since the Dayton Hamvention at the new location at the Green County Fairgrounds and everyone is still talking about it.

    Different….yes. Bigger….I think so. More food…you bet! Same enthusiasm about Amateur Radio…better than ever.

    I had a great day on Saturday working our booth and talked to dozens of hams from all over the world. We are, collectively, an interesting group of folks and our passion for Amateur Radio is growing stronger.

    It was good to see a lot of younger hams represented and the credit for that, I think, goes to all of us. I have never met a ham who wouldn’t take the time to talk to new ham…or a would like to be… ham. As our hobby grows and changes and we experiment with new types of communication the interest, the excitement begins to filter down. I know my career and my life would not be the same if wasn’t for amateur radio. If we can open doors for future generations everyone wins.

    Finally, I know a lot of improvements are in the works for next year. I’m sure by the it’s all said and done Xenia will be the greatest destination ever for Amateur Radio!!!

    Amateur Radio In Pennsylvania

    I spent about a week in Pennsylvania earlier this month and Amateur Radio is alive and well there.

    Just outside of Philadelphia you can hit repeaters in Delaware, Maryland, Philly and dozens of small towns in between . Despite the hills signals are good and the hams there have a done great job with high towers and coverage. I was never out of range of a repeater…even with a handheld!

    All of the repeaters I used were analogue and the traffic was pretty heavy! Apparently Amateur Radio signals are better than cell.

    Just one caveat. If you travel on Pennsylvania on the turnpike the mountains and the tunnels pose an obvious problem. You can receive several signals but you’ll need a little luck and a little power to make the contact.

    That’s it for this month.


    73,John, KD8IDJ

    ****************************************************

    THE SECTION TRAFFIC MANAGER
    David Maynard, WA3EZN - STM
    I would have liked to have gone to the Dayton Hamvention but was not able. I was off the air and assisting with a family emergency. Now that Hamvention has come and gone for this year it is time to begin thinking about the next big Ham Radio event, Field Day. 

    FIELD DAY
    A few words about bonus points for field day.  Here are the rules about originating radiograms and extra points.
    7.3.5. Message Origination to Section Manager: 100 bonus points for origination of a formal message to the ARRL Section Manager or Section Emergency Coordinator by your group from its site. You should include the club name, number of participants, Field Day location, and number of ARES operators involved with your station. The message must be transmitted during the Field Day period and a copy of it must be included in your submission in standard ARRL radiogram or no credit will be given. The message must leave or enter the Field Day operation via amateur radio RF.

    Here is a sample message for Section Manager N8SY and Emergency Coordinator N8BHL:

    1 ROUTINE AC8XX 17 ANYWHERE OH JUN 24
    SCOTT YONALLY, N8SY
    258 VALLEY HI DRIVE
    LEXINGTON, OH 44904
    419 512 4445
    BT
    XYZ RADIO CLUB HAVING FIELD
    DAY AT JOEY PARK WITH
    20 PARTICIPANTS AND 7 ARES
    MEMBERS 73
    BT
    XYZ RADIO CLUB FIELD DAY CHAIRMAN

    STAN BROADWAY, N8BHL
    3677 PEEL RD
    RADNOR, OH 43066
    614 600 1635

    The Section Manager message is separate from the messages handled in Rule 7.3.6. and may not be claimed for bonus points under that rule. Available to allClasses.

    7.3.6. Message Handling: 10 points for each formal message originated, relayed or received and delivered during the Field Day period, up to a maximum of 100 points (ten messages). Copies of each message must be included with the Field Day report. The message to the ARRL SM or SEC under Rule 7.3.5. does not count towards the total of 10 for this bonus. Available to all Classes. All messages claimed for bonus points must leave or enter the Field Day operation via amateur radio RF.

    Full Field Day rules are on the ARRL website athttp://www.arrl.org/field-day
    Your Field Day messages can be sent on a VHF traffic net or on the Ohio Single Sideband Net on 3972.5 at 10:30 AM, 4:15 and 6:45 PM.  You should get you message sent early into the Field Day operating period and remember to be patient as there could be a large volume of traffic on the nets.

    GENERATOR SAFETY
    If you are going into the field and away from commercial power for field day it is now time to check out the generator and review its use. Safety should be your number one priority.
    I am sure that owning an electrical generator must be appealing to anyone who plans on being prepared for emergencies or part of an emergency response team.  To us being able to generate electricity means we will be able to remain on the air for Field Day, during blackouts or at the scene of any emergency or disaster.  But are we thinking about safety when we set up and use the generators.

    Here are some basics regarding generators. But the first thing to do is read the instruction booklet or manual that came with the generator. If the manual is lost or missing, contact the generator's manufacturer for another manual.

    The correct way to use a generator is to connect a heavy-duty, outdoor-rated power cord to the generator. Radios and appliances can then be connected to the power cord.  Make sure that the outdoor-rated power cord has a sufficient wire gauge to handle the electrical load.

    Don't overload the generator.  All generators have a power rating. They should be used only when necessary and only to power a limited number of appliances or equipment. The total wattage used by the appliances should be less than the output rating of the generator. If you put too many appliances on the generator, it could seriously damage the appliances, radios and electronics. Overloading the generator could also cause fires in the over heated power cord. A generator should be sized to handle twice the expected load.

    While each type of generator has safety issues they all have certain things in common.  One thing most generators have in common is that the electricity generated needs to be conducted through wires to receptacles and radios.  On field day it is more likely that the generator will be exposed to layman not used to working with generators and long extension cords.  Consequently they can be exposed or involved in trips and falls over the electrical extension cords.  Animals, children or adults who behave like children in the same space as your generator or wiring can quickly make a bad situation worse and you must be prepared for this in your plans.   Extension cords on wet ground are a shock hazard, as is operating a generator with wet hands or when you are wet.  It is always a shame to lose good people to preventable accidents so don't take chances.

    Fuel and fire safety is a must. Have a fire extinguisher handy and the fuel stored a safe distance from the generator. The area should be mowed at least for a 20-foot diameter. Fuel must be stored in a separate area as well as the fire extinguisher in an accessible convenient place away from the generator area. NEVER REFUEL A GENERATOR WHEN IT IS RUNNING.

    Most generators produce heat. This can be a resource or a liability depending on how you manage it. You could cook on the exhaust manifold it is so hot or the same could become an ignition source for leaking fuel or nearby combustibles. Care must be taken to prevent burns to anyone in the area and also to prevent a fire while refueling the generator. It would be advisable to have an inspected fire extinguisher on hand just in case a fire would start.

    I encourage you to practice proper poison prevention safety by learning the signs of carbon monoxide poisoning.  An odorless, tasteless, gas that is a by-product of the combustion of just about any fuel, Carbon Monoxide (CO) is poisonous if it is not vented properly and if allowed to accumulate without sufficient oxygen in a confined area like a tent.  Do you know the symptoms of CO poisoning?  Symptoms in people include headache, dizziness, nausea, vomiting, irregular breathing, feeling tired or ill in a confined area like a tent or building and finally loss of consciousness and respiratory failure but fell fine away from the confined area . A generator should never be used indoors or in a confined area.

    The surest way to know if there is carbon monoxide in the area is to use a Carbon Monoxide detector. If you smell exhaust fumes or suspect CO poisoning leave the building or area immediately, get to fresh air and call 911 for assistance.

    Grounding is a difficult issue when using generators. For single-generator operation, powering a couple of station locations, there may not be any benefit in grounding. Making sure your generator has a good earth ground may help to avoid electrical shocks.  Check the generator owner's manual for correct grounding information.  With large distribution systems, grounding of the generator is best with at least an 8-foot ground rod and standard NEC procedures must be followed. Check this article on the Ohio website for a picture of how not to ground the generator.

    Other considerations are placement for access, noise abatement, distribution of the feed cables and grounding if necessary.

    GFI systems generally don’t perform well in field operations due to long feed runs and ground loops with the various end locations. If your generator has a GFI you may have Ground Fault issues.
    Many small generator units are the inverter type and although efficient and light they can create a large amount of inverter hash that raises your HF noise floor to an unacceptable level. A brushless generator is best.

    FINAL TIPS BUT WORTH REPEATING
    Many generator parts are hot enough to burn you during operation. Stay away from the muffler and other hot areas.  Keep children away from portable electric generators and their electrical connections and fuel at all times.  Read the instruction booklet or owner's manual that came with the generator.  Also check the generator owner's manual for correct grounding information.

    Grounding the antenna feed for lightning is a much more sensible option with the possible cessation of operation during storms. That means disconnecting and sitting inside the car.
    Have fun and have a safe Field Day.

    Additional Resources:











    That all for is month,

    You can view the STM’s monthly report on the website.. http://arrl-ohio.org/stm/stm.html

    73,

    David WA3EZN

    ****************************************************

    OUT AND ABOUT

    Lyn Alfman, N8IMW - ASM

    May went by so quickly!  I only attended the Coshocton County Amateur Radio Association meeting because the Cambridge Amateur Radio Association’s May meeting was postponed a week due to the observed Memorial Day holiday. The Guernsey County Amateur Radio Emergency Service meeting and training session has changed it meeting day, time, and location to the first Monday of the month; therefore, they did not have a meeting in May.  The Zanesville Amateur Radio Club did not meet in April or May, but they will meet in June.

    I went to the Hamvention at the Green County Fairgrounds in Xenia on Friday and Saturday.  I helped with the booth on Saturday morning.  I saw and spoke with many local hams.  The new venue was nice, but of course, there are always differences between having it in a large arena and a fairground.  The buildings were clean, and some were even air-conditioned. The volunteers and staff were extremely accommodating.  Friday was very sunny and hot, so, of course, I got sunburned.  The remote parking was the best way to go.  I parked at the high school, took the school bus, and was on the grounds in a matter of minutes.

    I, unfortunately, will not be attending the Field Day activities this year.  My grandson is getting married in South Carolina that Saturday afternoon.  (Maybe I can find a Field Day location to visit after the reception before I head back to Myrtle Beach. )

    Even though I will not be at Field Day, as PIO, I will place W8VP on the Field Day locator, send out a press release, send out invitations to attend Field Day to elected officials and served agencies, set up our information table handouts and information packets for the media, print out and go over the Field Day package with the participants, and arrange for someone to track and verify bonus points. 

    Have a safe and fun Field Day everyone!

    Remember to be “Radio Active”!


    ’73 Lyn, N8IMW  

    ****************************************************

    ARES TRAINING UPDATE
    Jim Yoder, W8ERW – ARES Data Manager

    ARES Training Update
    The season of being busy is here, the Hamvention is behind us and a list of ARES activities has begun to take shape.  The Great Ohio Bicycle Adventure, GOBA is scheduled to pass through Seneca County again this year requiring several days of ARES support and our Hams are working on the logistics and assignments.  Of course, Field Day 2017 will be here soon and all of us hopefully will participate and be able to enjoy perhaps what is our most significant activity each year.  It will again be a busy Summer of Ham activity.  Have fun and play radio.  Our work is serious, but fun is also an important part of what we do and enjoy as Amateur Radio Operators.

    Again, I can report ARES training continues to grow and the numbers I report to our SM Scott N8SY are both encouraging and very impressive.  If you aren’t seeing them in Scott’s news updates, get on the mailing list and stay up with all the happenings around the Ohio Section including our progress in getting ARES members trained.  The numbers are increasing daily and as we continue to grow, the State of Ohio recognizes our benefit and our capability for supporting state wide efforts to manage disasters and critical response efforts as evidenced by the Ohio Responds program.  The FEMA NIMS courses are an important part of these efforts and many of you have already been approved for participation.  This is great work and is a serious credit to each of you and the Ohio Section. 

    As a reminder, I can provide a list for EC’s and individuals if requested, of the training taken for your county ARES organization.  Scott also updates regularly on the ARRLOhio.org web page, the list of those who have completed all four of the required FEMA courses, ICS-100, 200, 700 and 800.  There are many of you in the database who need just one more course to be on that list and others only two.  I encourage everyone to get on the list by completing your training.  It does take a little time and the online training is not difficult.  You will find the material is very logical and is structured to give you a good understanding of what will happen when we are called to assist our public service agencies in the event of a disaster situation.  The training will give you the assurance that your efforts will be put to good use.  Your experience and training as Amateurs is both needed and significant to managing an appropriate response to any disaster should one occur. 

    Again, I want to thank you for the diligent effort in completing FEMA NIMS training.  If you have any questions or need to verify your courses, please let me know.  SEC Stan Broadway is also a resource as well as your county EC who can help you with any questions etc.  When you complete your training, don’t forget to send your EC a copy of the certificates provided by FEMA and also to me.  It doesn’t matter how we get them as long as we do to insure you are documented.  I receive them regularly as well from SM Scott and SEC Stan as well as our county EC’s.   You can submit individual certificates in .PDF format ideally or you can request a transcript from FEMA that will list them all in a single document.  Either form for submission is acceptable and will be saved along with inclusion in the ARES Training Database. 

    Keep up the great work and be assured that your effort is both appreciated and recognized.  The Ohio Section is making a terrific showing and it’s all the great effort and dedication Ohio Hams are doing to insure we are ready when we are called to serve supporting our local communities and the Great State of Ohio.


    73 and Thank you,

    Jim W8ERW

    ****************************************************

    Ohio Repsonds

    Ok.. Here’s the latest update on Ohio Responds. We now have 122 persons approved!! Let’s keep thisgoing. We have over 500 with all their certificates on file. Let’s get everyone to get moving and sign up for Ohio Responds.

    Signing up with Ohio Responds will give you liability protection under the State of Ohio. This is a real big things folks.. Where else can you get liability insurance for FREE.

    Now, admittedly their system was designed for another purpose, so in some places it doesn’t match up well with Amateur Radio Operators and what we do. I have created a webpage where you’ll find all the pertinent information for getting registered on Ohio Responds website with as little issues as possible. You really do need to read this information BEFORE you attempt to register, and you will need to have all 4 of your NIMS courses completed and in our statewide database first! There’s some very specific information up there that you’ll need to know to correctly complete the registration process since it doesn’t match up well in some places with what we do.  Here’s a link to that webpage…http://arrl-ohio.org/ohio-responds-page.html   You can also find this link on the main page of the Ohio Section website as well.

    How do I know if I’m on the list or not? Here’s the link to the list.  
    http://arrl-ohio.org/SEC/special/nims_roster.html  Don’t see your name on the list, and you’ve submitted your certificates? Contact me immediately!

    ****************************************************
     
    LET'S TALK
    Scott Yonally, N8SY - SM

    Hey Gang,

    WOW, it’s almost Field Day! Are you ready? I’ve been keeping a sharp ear to what all the clubs that I have visited as to what all they are going to do it get the points! I again will be attempting to visit with as many of you as I can during Field Day.

    I need your help.. Please take pictures of your Field Day and send them to me. I’ll display all the pictures in a gallery that I’m setting up on our website. Yes, I’ll be out and about taking pictures, but I need your pictures too. Please send me your Field Day pictures to:n8sy@n8sy.com
     
    Have you registered for the “Handbook Giveaway” drawing yet? If you haven’t, go to: 
    http://arrl-ohio.org/handbook.html  and get registered. You never know, you just may be the next winner for sure.

    Are you getting those emails from me? If not, all you have to do is to “Opt-In” to receive them. Heck, just send me an email   n8sy@n8sy.com   I’ll get you added to the mailing list. There’s a link to do this on the Ohio Section website, it’s on the bottom left corner. For your convenience. Here’s a direct link to it: 
    http://arrl-ohio.org/forwarder/forwarding.html  I urge all of you to make sure that everyone, regardless of whether they are a League member or not, gets signed up for one of these options. You can always “Opt-Out” at any time if you feel this is not what you were expecting.  Did you know that the Ohio Section mailing list is almost 2,000 strong now? It is, and the ARRL emailing list for Ohio is over 3,600. We have 28,000 licensees’ in Ohio, let’s see if we can get this email out to all 28,000 by the end of the year!  Just let me know that you want added to the listing. I do get 8 – 10 new people every week! If you know of anyone that might be interested in getting my emails that isn’t already, please let them know!
     
    On that same subject, there’s another NEW – one question – questionnaire on the Ohio Section Website! This question is really important for me to know. It will only take about 2 seconds for you to answer it, and you can see how your answer stacks up with others instantly. If you haven’t done it yet, please do. I really want to hear from you. And, if you have a question that you’d like to see on our questionnaire, please send it to me! I have had several of you already do that and I would love to see more!!

    Are you a member of the ARRL?? If you aren’t a League member, this is a great opportunity to become one. Want more information on how to join? Here’s the link:http://www.arrl.org/membership-levels. There’s even a 90 day FREE trial that you can apply for if you’ve never been a member.. Got questions about being a member or what the League is all about? Send me an email n8sy@n8sy.com   I’ll be happy to call or write to you. We can even meet and have coffee if you’d like, and I’ll buy!!

    I’m sure all of you have heard me say that I’m always available for you, whether you’re an ARRL member or not. It’s true, and you can feel free to write or call me anytime. If you have any questions, concerns, or would just like to sit and chat awhile over a cup of coffee or something cold to drink, feel free to call or write me
    (419) 512-4445 or n8sy@n8sy.com  

    That’s going to do it for this month. I hope to see you all at your hamfests, club meetings or on the air!

    73, Scott, N8SY

    ****************************************************
     
    THE OFFICIAL OBSERVER COORDINATOR
    John Perone, W8RXX - OOC

    The total hours of listening in May were 826

    No OO cards were sent


    73, John, W8RXX



    ****************************************************

    SPECIAL EVENTS STATIONS

    Events Stations

    07/03/2017 | Railroad Telegraphers
    Jul 3-Jul 14, 0100Z-2300Z, K8T, Bellevue, OH. Mad River & NKP Railroad Museum. 14.245 7.195 3.850 146.865. QSL. Rick Wolfe, KD8KWV, 358 High St., Bellevue, OH 44811. Celebrating the significance of the use of telegraphy with the advancement of the railroad. The telegrapher's primary duty was maintaining communication between the train dispatcher, who was usually many miles away, with trains and the whole rail system. We will be operating all modes from the Mad River & NKP Railroad Museum in Bellevue, Ohio. QSL request with SASE to Rick Wolfe, KD8KWV, 358 High Street, Bellevue, Ohio 44811

    07/06/2017 | Ohio State Parks The Grand Tour
    Jul 6-Sep 8, 1900Z-0300Z, W8WDS, Cincinnati, OH. Multiple Local Clubs. 146.520 14.260 7.235 3.810. Certificate & QSL. William Schramm, 4220 Endeavor Dr, Unit 204, Cincinnati, OH 45252. The Grand Tour is a special event running from July 7, 2016 to Sept 9, 2016. We will be operating Amateur radio stations each day from a different Ohio State Park. We will also dedicate each park's operation to a fallen/disabled Ohio Soldier/Sailor/Airmen. THIS EVENT HAS BEEN CANCELLED. ohiostateparks.gaterunner.com

    07/15/2017 | Marvin Gilbert (KD8GPF) Special Event
    Jul 15-Jul 16, 0800Z-1600Z, W8UCO, Marysville, OH. W8UCO ARC (Union County Amateur Radio Club). 3.840 7.240. Certificate. Marvin Gilbert Special Event (W8UCO/KD8GPF), 24581 Sandusky Rd, Richwood, OH 43344. Commemorating 57 years of public service with Civil Defense/Union County Emergency Management Agency . Marvin C. Gilbert was a lifelong member of Trinity Lutheran Church, serving on various boards at the church, a member the Marysville Evening Lion’s Club, the American Legion Post 79, served with the Union County Civil Defense and Union County EMA for 57 years, 25 of those years as Chief. He was also a committee member for the Marysville High School Hall of Fame, was a board member of the American Red Cross and a member of the Union County Republican Club, serving as Treasurer and Central District Committeeman. He enjoyed playing Dart Ball for over 50 years and getting together for his Wednesday afternoon card club but most of all, he cherished his granddaughter and attending her activities, never missing a soccer or softball game. A graduate of Marysville High School, Marvin served in the National Guard, worked 42 years at O.M. Scott’s, retiring as a shipping manager. Born July 9, 1941 in Marysville. On May 2, 1965, he married his wife of 51 years, Sharon (Wasserbeck) and she survives in Marysville. Also surviving is his son, Brad (Tara) Gilbert of Marysville; his granddaughter, Emma Karen Gilbert of Marysville ohiohams.net

    07/24/2017 | Cabwaylingo State Park Dog Days of Summer
    Jul 24-Jul 30, 0000Z-2359Z, W8V, Cincinnati, OH. KE8BBB. 14.330 7.400 7.180. Certificate & QSL. Arthur F. Menges, KE8BBB, 2603 Foran Dr., Cincinnati, OH 45238. Special Event to run entire week at various times from various locations within 8123 acre state park. QSL Manager: Arthur F. Menges KE8BBB

    ****************************************************

    OHIO HAMFEST CALENDAR

    06/17/2017 | Milford Hamfest 27th Annual
    Location: Milford, OH
    Sponsor: Milford Amateur Radio Club
    Website: 
    http://www.w8mrc.com

    07/08/2017 | GARS Germantown Hamfest
    Location: Germantown, OH
    Type: ARRL Hamfest
    Sponsor: Germantown Amateur Radio Society (GARS)
    Website: 
    http://GARSohio.org

    07/09/2017 | 20/9 Radio Club Hamfest, Computer & Electronics Show
    Location: Austintown, OH
    Type: ARRL Hamfest
    Sponsor: 20/9 Radio Club, Inc.
    Website: 
    http://20over9.org

    07/15/2017 | NOARSFEST
    Location: Elyria, OH
    Sponsor: Northern Ohio Amateur Radio Society
    Website: 
    http://noars.net

    07/16/2017 | Van Wert Hamfest
    Location: Van Wert, OH
    Sponsor: Van Wert Amateur Radio Club
    Website: 
    http://w8fy.org

    07/30/2017 | Portage Hamfair '17
    Location: Ravenna, OH
    Sponsor: Portage Amateur Radio Club, Inc.
    Website: 
    http://hamfair.com 

    We now have a complete listing of hamfests in Ohio on the website. Go to: http://arrl-ohio.org/hamfests.html  to see everything that is currently scheduled, including the Great Lakes Division Convention!

    ****************************************************

    A final – final.. 

    Today is June 16th, and it’sNational Flip Flop Day as well as National Fudge Day, yum, yum!!!

    Now, on that note... Amateur Radio is exciting and a lot of FUN. It’s also a learning experience for everyone! Share your enjoyment and learning experiences with those just coming into Amateur Radio!! 

    eof..






  2. In this issue:

    -> OFF-SITE PARKING STRONGLY SUGGESTED
    -> THE TECHNICAL COORDINATOR
    -> AFFILIATED CLUB COORDINATOR REPORT
    -> THE SECTION EMERGENCY COORDINATOR
    -> THE PUBLIC INFORMATION COORDINATOR
    -> THE SECTION TRAFFIC MANAGER
    -> OUT AND ABOUT
    -> ARES TRAINING UPDATE
    -> OHIO RESPONDS
    -> LET'S TALK
    -> OUR NEW AFFILIATED CLUBS COORDINATOR
    -> THE OFFICIAL OBSERVER COORDINATOR
    -> SPECIAL EVENT STATIONS IN OHIO
    -> OHIO HAMFEST CALENDAR
    -> MY FINAL

    ****************************************************

    Hamvention® Promoting Use of Off-Site Parking Areas
    (from ARRL Bulletins)

    Hamvention® General Chairman Ron Cramer, KD8ENJ, is suggesting that visitors to the May 19-21 event at the Greene County Fairgrounds and Expo Center in Xenia, Ohio, use off-site parking in order to avoid traffic problems. Hamvention will offer free on-site and off-site parking during the event. 

    “We are now promoting using off-site parking as a means to avoid traffic congestion around the Fairgrounds and possible lack of sufficient parking if there is heavy rain and the soccer fields are not available to us,” Cramer said today.

    Maps of the four off-site parking areas are on the Hamvention website (http://hamvention.org ), and free transportation will be provided to and from all off-site parking areas.

    Kramer said that all four lots are within 15 minutes of the new Hamvention venue and will allow bus access to the Fairgrounds. Talk-In (http://hamvention.org/travel-parking/directions/ )will advise guests about available or filled parking areas and help direct guests to a better location, Cramer said.

    According to the City of Xenia website, Hamvention’s principal effects on Xenia will be temporary traffic congestion and potentially heavier restaurant patronage.  The most congested streets in Xenia during Hamvention are expected to be Detroit Street, Purcell Avenue, Northwest Street, Galloway Street, King Street, and Hollywood Avenue.

    ****************************************************

    THE TECHNICAL COORDINATOR
    Jeff Kopcak – TC

    Hey gang,

    DMR: you're hearing a ton about it from the Ohio Section and the number of repeaters has exploded with nearly 60 in the state.  DMR saw growth due to inexpensive offerings of quality radios at last year’s show.  I suspect this year will be no different with new offerings from vendors, possibility of dual band radios around the corner, and many more groups supporting DMR.

    How many of you know the terminology and could program a DMR radio from scratch?  Passing around a code plug makes the mode seem plug-and-play and it’s a great way to get started.  Relying on existing code plugs leaves most of us unable to change the configuration of our own radios or even know how it works.  What happens if you need to change programming, add a repeater, the code plug information is old, or wrong?

    When I started last year, I found there was very little information available on DMR in ham radio.  I learned DMR by doing a couple things.  First, I looked at the code plug I downloaded for my TYT MD-380.  I got a lot of knowledge playing around with that.  There were a couple things I wasn’t quite sure about.  When I got together with a buddy who was interested in DMR, we further played around with the software, tried different settings, and I filled in those gaps.
    With the continued support from the Ohio Section, one of our Technical Specialists, Dave – KD8TWG has been giving training presentations on radio programming and he created a DMR Learning Series explaining terminology and etiquette:

    I put together a paper with the goal of explaining DMR to the person just starting out and include some more technical descriptions.  It started as an idea to write an article or two for the OSJ around Dayton time so anyone jumping in would have good information.  After starting the project, it quickly became much bigger.

    The first writing talks about the DMR standard and compares it to other made-for-ham-radio modes like D-STAR and Fusion.  One topic that might be of interest is the section on 'is it legal?'  I've heard this question come up frequently and even clubs in the section are questioning the legality.  Radios, CPS, code plugs, registering for a DMR ID are all discussed.  I talk about repeaters, c-Bridges, networks, and some of the issues one might encounter.  Terminology covered includes time slots, talk groups, reflectors, contacts, RX Group Lists, channels, zones, scan lists, and hotspots:http://www.k8jtk.org/2017/05/10/dmr-in-amateur-radio-terminology/

    The second will deal with creating a sample code plug for a factitious repeater, tying all the terminology together.  Afterwards, you will be able to create and update your own code plugs!  Stay tuned to next month.  DMR repeaters in Ohio:https://www.repeaterbook.com/repeaters/feature_search.php?state_id=39&type=DMR

    At the request of Cuyahoga County Skywarn, Technical Specialist Dave – KD8TWG has installed a Sage EAS ENDEC device on the 146.76 repeater in Cleveland.  146.76 is the primary Skywarn repeater for Cuyahoga County.  The device is the same used by radio and television stations to broadcast Emergency Alert System messages.  It monitors NOAA weather radio frequencies and broadcasts tornado watches/warnings, thunderstorm watches/warnings – for Cuyahoga County, and the weekly EAS test.  It’s been performing flawlessly!

    The data and attention tones are the same everyone is familiar with.  These are the same one would hear tuning to a broadcast radio or TV station during an event.  In order to not clobber an existing QSO, the device will delay playing the alert until the repeater is free.  DTMF tones are available to Skywarn NCS’s to disable the alerts if it begins to interfere with the net.  Some innovative working being done here.  Thanks for the hard work Dave.

    Anthony - K8ZT, our ASM for Educational Outreach, shared some links with me from his site.  He has put together lists of great resources for doing projects, ideas for the class room, training classes, and build projects a group my want to coordinate:

    After my write up of podcasts last May
    (http://www.k8jtk.org/2016/05/15/ohio-section-journal-the-technical-coordinator-may-2016-edition/), I try to catch ones that feature a ham in the Ohio section.  QSO Today episode 144 featured John Ackermann - N8UR.  John was a past president of TAPR (which I'm a member) and is a big proponent of open source hardware and software (openly sharing designs that make the community better).  Eric and John talked about his usage of SDR radios and this collection of test equipment.  He's done alot of experimenting with APRS and shares some of his lessons learned.  I especially liked his idea that hams can achieve much greater data transfer speeds in the 3 GHz portion of our spectrum.  Maybe others in the section will develop technology to utilize that spectrum more than we are currently.  The podcast is available on your favorite podcast app by searching for “QSO Today” or by going to:http://www.qsotoday.com/podcasts/n8ur

    Don't forget #HamNation300 special event is starting the Wednesday following Dayton.  There will be stations operating D-STAR, DMR, Echolink, possibly Fusion, P25 and anything else we can get our hands on – in addition to SSB.  I will be doing D-STAR, JT65, and maybe PSK too for some HF digital contacts.  Points challenge is available for those who enjoy the social aspect of a special event.  Tune in to Ham Nation (twit.tv/hn) every Wednesday evening.  Details can be found on our event page:https://www.hamnationdstar.net/2017/04/05/ham-nation-300-special-event/.  I will also be participating in the Ham Nation forum at Hamvention on Saturday, 10:30a in Room 1.

    The show featured the digital net controllers this past Wednesday (5/10).  My ugly mug was featured along with my good friend Andrew- WA8LIV from the DMR net and Dave – N3NTV from the Echolink net.  You can watch the segment if you dare: 
    https://youtu.be/afWX5kQSBAg?t=1h11m27s or download it at:https://twit.tv/shows/ham-nation/episodes/299.  There’s a reason (more than one?) I stayed behind the camera when I worked TV production.  I kid, check it out and join in the fun of #HamNation300.

    That's about it for this month.  I'm looking forward to meeting all of you at Dayton (er, Xenia) this year.  I've heard there were a record number of ticket pre-orders which I hope means a successful year for Hamvention.  One thing I can guarantee for this year: it will be different for all of us.  I'm excited to see what's in store at this new venue. 

    Get your shopping lists ready…. and see you at Dayton!

    Thanks for reading and


    73… de Jeff – K8JTK

    ****************************************************

    THE AFFILIATED CLUBS COORDINATOR
    John Myers, KD8MQ - ACC

    Hi everyone, we’ve gotten to the end of my run. This column will be my last, and my tenure as your Affiliated Club Coordinator ends in a couple weeks. I’d like for you to welcome Tom Sly, WB8LCD as your new ACC effective June 1st. You’ll read more from Tom in this issue.

    When I took this job 2014, I knew it would not be forever; that the time would come when new things & new challenges would entice me. With some big stuff happening at church this year, that time is at hand. I feel that trying to do justice to those commitments while being ACC just isn’t going to work.

    So with that out of the way, let’s move on to the subject on everyone’s minds; Hamvention. Will you be heading to Xenia this year? Despite all that you may have read online, there are a LOT of folks working hard to make this first year go off flawlessly. Will there be room for improvement? Sure there will. But, if you go to the big show, have fun, and give it a chance! I’ll be doing a single day bus trip this year, but hope to return next year for the entire show.

    Also, I thought I’d hammer on this subject one last time. Let’s keep those club records up to date with the league. It really is that important. Even if there are no changes, they need to be updated at least once per year. There’s more information on how to update your club record at www.arrl.org/club-update. While the hammer is out, let’s talk about the Special Service Club status. If your club is a SSC, there is no way to pull up your expiration date online at this time. The best way for now, is to contact your Affiliated Club Coordinator, or Section Manager for this information.

    So, let’s have some fun this summer. In the next few months, we have ARRL Field Day, the Ohio QSO Party, and the Ohio State Parks On The Air contest coming up. All of these are an awesome chance for you, or your club to be sought after on the HF bands. Get out there and have some fun.

    Other opportunities abound; I’ve been beating the drum for a while now about clubs doing Special Event Stations. But there are other options. Just pick a day, and do a “Park-Pedition” set up a portable station, invite friends with their gear, bring a grill, etc. Don’t Plan; Just Do!

    On that note; Ideas tend to get discussed, and planned to death in club meetings. Sometimes, you just need take that leap of faith, step out, and do things, letting the details fall into place on their own. One thing I’ve learned from my Awesome Wife, Lyn, is that sometimes you can spend too much time planning, and not enough time doing.

    I’ve had a lot of fun being your ACC. I’ve spoken to a lot of you, by e-mail, phone, and in person. My almost three years in this job have been a real eye-opener, and I continue to be impressed by the caliber of clubs in the Ohio Section. This has been one wild ride that I would not trade for anything.

    Thanks everyone, but especially to Scott, N8SY. He is the kind of Hard working Section Manager who makes my job a breeze!

    And, as Porky Pig would say, “Ble, ble, ble, that’s all folks!”.

    73
    DE KD8MQ

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    THE SECTION EMERGENCY COORDINATOR
    Stan Broadway, N8BHL - SEC

    Technology and Reliability

    These two concepts, each desirable in its own right, can become confusing when applied to planning for emergencies.  Each county Emergency Coordinator (EC) is responsible for creating plans to carry his ARES unit through an emergency: Alerting and activating the group, organizing a communications network that will be responsive and comprehensive for their agencies, managing the ARES volunteers, maintaining their operation, and successfully demobilizing and reporting both internally and to the Section or League.  It’s impossible to create a uniform approach- each county’s potential emergencies differ, each county’s agencies operate somewhat differently, and each county’s politics can vary widely. The EC must navigate all those different waters while keeping volunteers interested and trained and avoiding the pitfalls of personalities of ‘grumpy old men’. 

    While each county does vary, we can put up a framework that can be modeled and adapted to each county, and that’s what we tried to do with the Ohio Section Emergency Response Plan (OSERP).  Because amateur radio must be ready to perform under the harshest of conditions – the loss of all other means of communication- we have to make our plans using the ‘lowest common denominator’ approach: HF and VHF/UHF simplex, no power and no fancy stuff.  Ohio has a fairly well thought out plan in that regard, with an eye toward directing messages from our agencies (typically an EMA) to the Ohio EOC in Columbus.  But that doesn’t mean it is the ~only~ plan we can have.

    ARES advertises that we can be a dependable communications ally in many different circumstances. For the RNC and related events last July, there was no communications emergency. We were in place as a ‘standing backup’ to reinforce existing communication paths. With that in mind, we have the option of trying many of the new modes available to us. We’ve been using fldigi to send IS-213 messages reliably on HF and VHF/UHF, and each county needs to practice that regularly. The use of DMR, Fusion and D-star all can create a dependable, wide-area network!  There are two big issues with digital: First, the inability to send digital messages (IS-213 and others) through fldigi or other software. Second, the variety of modes creates the situation faced by car makers trying to introduce AM stereo- the inability to reach a common standard brought a hasty demise to the whole idea. Will that happen in amateur radio?  Into which pot do we toss our money?  My answer is: as many as you can get. 

    We anticipate adding DMR at the Sarge, where there is a D-star radio already (it gets only light use if at all).  We had good luck with the DMR “Ohio Channel” during RNC, and the inexpensive radios seem to generate the potential of more repeaters and more radios in the field.  Consider a statewide blizzard, or a flood event such as several states to our south are currently battling. A linked network of DMR repeaters would conceivably offer handheld coverage across the wide operations field. That would be pretty cool.  So my advice is to cultivate the new stuff- perhaps find an expert in DMR, another in Fusion and Wires-x who might be AEC’s in their specific field. Let’s all work together and cooperate to put all available tools into use.

    Another ‘new – not new’ service we should be encouraging is Winlink. It’s been a proven performer for years both serving sea going vessels with position and email support, and providing ‘last mile’ email for large disasters. Previously constrained to expensive packet modems, we can now use Winmore and a sound card!  The best thing here is we can originate a normal email from, say, a PC in a vehicle through VHF or even HF onto the Internet. These emails are delivered to anyone, who can respond using their own email system.  What a great way to link everyone! Hamilton County is pioneering ARES involvement with Winlink, and I urge you all to pick up on their lead! 

    I have found it a bit incongruous that the new national traffic organization was launched with the attitude (in their early publications and newsletters) that while ARES was distracted and enraptured by new technology they, with their old-fashioned message handling would ‘save the world’.  Indeed, they are trying to move into the neighborhood proclaiming the ability to move IS-213’s… in an aldulterated form.  In Ohio, our plan is that ARES will handle inter-agency messaging. With that, there is a wide and inviting table for traffic handling organizations to step in and offer messages home and other ‘health and welfare’ traffic to victims of disasters. What a great partnership that forms with amateur radio service both agencies and the public.

    We are cultivating a new relationship with “Ohio Responds” – a database registering volunteers which helps assure our liability protection under Ohio law. We’ll have more on that soon!  

    Now this is all exciting- but the whole thing depends on one person: the ARES volunteer. If apathy, disinterest and unwillingness to invest time and energy remove our volunteers from being active the whole thing falls apart.  You wouldn’t join a basketball team without expecting to practice, or a band without spending practice time at home. Likewise, ARES membership involves our time, and energy.  We this year have said every member needs to have the four ‘magic’ NIMS courses. You’re all to be encouraged- the numbers look very good!  I am extremely grateful for your work!

    You can view the SEC’s monthly reports on the website.. http://arrl-ohio.org/SEC/default.html


    73, Stan, N8BHL

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    THE PUBLIC INFORMATION COORDINATOR
    John Ross, KD8IDJ - PIC

    T-Minus Six weeks!

    The deadline for the 2017 Ohio Section Newsletter Contest is just 6 weeks away…June 30th.

    Remember, you need two copies of your newsletter from different months, to be entered.  So far I think everyone has done that but check your list just to be sure.

    The judges are ready and the awards will be presented in August at our meeting and hamfest.

    Please call or email me with any questions.

    DMR CONTINUES TO IMPRESS

    We have a family member, who is a Battalion Chief for the local fire department, and he has always been in interested in Amateur Radio. He’s more interested now that I showed him my DMR radio!

    Fire fighters and law enforcement officers are always looking for better ways to communicate and I explained to our friend that the new FirstNet system, which is in development for a partial nationwide turn-up later this year, is a lot like our DMR system. As I keyed my handheld radio and talked to operators in Northern Ohio, Missouri, and several other areas with ease, his interest grew and now he’s on his way to getting his amateur license!!

    I still marvel at our analog repeater systems…how well they work and their reliability…but DMR is a pretty cutting edge technology and we’ve been using it for a couple of years now!

    So, if you want to “reel in” a new ham…demonstrations are great way to do that. The technology which Amateur Radio has helped pioneer and develop for over a century has left a lasting impression and DMR has now joined our family of accomplishments.

    Amateur Radio TV Shows Cancelled

    Amateur Radio has lost its guest starring roles on two network television shows.

    ABC’s Last Man Standing was cancelled last week. The Tim Allen show often used Amateur Radio and Tim’s shack was seen in many shots. Allen is actually a licensed ham, so maybe there is hope he will use it again in a new show.

    The show Frequency was also cancelled. That show was about a police detective who communicated with her departed father using “the ham”. The show played pretty fast and loose with the rules and technology but still gave Amateur Radio a little boost.

    So, I guess the networks are ready now for a real show about Amateur Radio.  I have plenty of unused channels on my Direct TV so I’ll talk to AT&T this week about a pilot!!!!!


    2017 DAYTON HAMVENTION

    I did a little reconordering  a few weeks ago and took a drive to the new location of the Dayton Hamvention…. in Xenia! Yes it will be different but hams are pretty good at making things work. I’m looking forward the event. I’ve been going since I was 15 years old and I don’t want to break the tradition.

    I’ll be at the Ohio Section Booth on Saturday afternoon. Stop by and talk about ham radio, public information, or just say hello.

    See you at the Hamvention!


    73,John, KD8IDJ

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    THE SECTION TRAFFIC MANAGER
    David Maynard, WA3EZN - STM

    By the time you will read this the “Dayton Hamvention” will be just days away.  The Dayton Hamvention is generally considered to be the world's largest hamfest. Hamvention will be held May 19, 20 and 21, 2017 at the Greene County Fairgrounds and Expo Center near Xenia and not Dayton. The Hamvention offers forums, exhibit space and a flea market and usually claims to have over 20,000 visitors. Many amateur radio enthusiasts go out of their way to attend the Dayton Hamvention, traveling from all over the United States, Canada, Mexico and various parts of the world and even as far as Australia, Japan and Russia.

    The entire staff of Hamvention volunteers is working hard behind the scenes to make 2017 a year to remember as they complete the transition from the old Hara Arena location to Hamvention’s new home at the Greene County Fairgrounds and Exposition Center.  For more information, please select the tab below to visit pages of interest. http://hamvention.org/contact-us/

    You never know what you’ll find at the Dayton Hamvention. Chances are you’ll find equipment ranging from radios made in the 1950s with vacuum tubes to modern computer-controlled transceivers. If nothing else, you’ll get an education on the wide range of amateur radio equipment that’s out there.

    You’ll find more than used equipment at a Dayton, though. Many dealers will bring new equipment to Dayton and have inside booths to show off their radios. This is your chance to look at a number of different radios that you may have only been able to look at in catalogs and compare different models. In addition, dealers often offer “hamfest prices,” so you may be able to get that radio at a slight discount.

    Hamfests are also good places to connect with other hams. Quite often, you’ll meet guys that you’ve only talked to on the air. It’s a lot of fun to connect a name and call sign with a face. Sometimes, different ham groups, such as NTS groups, FISTS, ARES/RACES groups or QRP clubs, will set up a table to promote their group. You can use this opportunity to find out more about these groups and their activities.

    Hamfests are basically swap meets/flea markets geared towards ham radio, electronic, and computer enthusiasts and almost anything else electronic. There are a lot of reasons to go to a hamfest, including:
    * You get to see a lot of ham radio gear in one place.
    * You might be able to get a good deal on some used (or new) equipment.
    * You might find something that will be fun to play with.
    * You get to meet hams face-to-face that you’ve only talked to on the air.
    * You can learn something new at one of the programs or forums

    If you plan on attending a hamfest for the first time, try to go with a group or someone who has experience.  In either case, alone or with experienced hams, the following will be helpful.

    Bring lots of cash - most sellers will only take cash, and you don't want to miss out on something because you don't have enough money on you.  Make sure the cash is in small bills, not 50’s and 100’s which may scare off the seller.

    Try to haggle - many sellers price stuff above what they expect to get for it because they know most buyers will haggle. So don't be afraid to offer a lower price for something. However, don't be a jerk. Most prices are negotiable; more so after lunch, but a good deal goes quickly. Most vendors are not interested in trades, but you do no harm by offering.
    Don't spend money you can’t afford to lose – Most hams are honest about what they sell, and try to test used items and describe them accurately. Still, sometimes stuff is defective or worked when it was tested but got knocked around in transit.

    Also keep in mind that not every seller knows that much about what they are selling - there are a lot of resellers who just buy lots of stuff at auctions or the like and drag it to the hamfest.

    BUYER BEWARE. If you are going to buy used equipment at a high cost, ask to test it to make sure it works. Ask the seller for contact information.  If a vendor refuses to demonstrate a supposedly functional piece of gear, or won’t open up a used piece of equipment for inspection, you may want to move along.  Be familiar with the smell of burnt or overheated electronics, especially transformers and sealed components. Direct replacements may be difficult to obtain.

    If you are looking for something specific, know what you are looking before you go.  You can’t ask for a widget for your radio and not even know what model radio you have. If you need a part, research the part number or specs before you go. If you know exactly what you are looking for, check the auction Web sites and radio swap sites, such as www.ebay.com  www.eham.net, andwww.qrz.com, before you attend the hamfest. You can get an idea of the going price and average condition, so you’re less likely to get taken.

    Remember if you buy it some one has to carry it to the car.  The vender is not expected to help in this carrying endeavor.

    Now to the Hamfest itself, those that get there early can get the really good stuff, which will sell really fast. Those that stay late will get the deals where people hate to lug stuff home, so you can sometimes get some great deals to just take merchandise off the seller's hands.

    Take a pen and pad of paper.At the Dayton flee market, it's almost impossible to remember where something was you saw 30 minutes ago. Keep track of that item by writing down where it is when you see it. Then you can easily find it again later. Writing down the price is also a good idea for comparison bargain hunting.

    Dress appropriately - comfortable shoes, layers in case it's warm or cold, rain gear if there is a chance of rain. Some people find a backpack useful if they are buying a lot of small items

    Don’t count on smaller hamfests having food available, but the larger hamfests like Dayton almost always have a hamburger stand. Expect the same level of quality as that of the concession stands. Taking along several bottles of water is a good idea, especially if it is going to be hot and sunny.

    In conclusion, hamfests are a great place to pick up interesting pieces of equipment, both new and used, and also picked up a lot of unique items you may never find anywhere else. If going to a hamfest, carry cash and give yourself a budget. Don’t be afraid to walk away if you don’t see something in your price range. Buyers remorse for spending too much is worse than the feeling of letting something get away. There’s always the next hamfest.  And most importantly, Have fun.

    That all for is month,

    You can view the STM’s monthly report on the website.. http://arrl-ohio.org/stm/stm.html

    73,

    David WA3EZN

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    OUT AND ABOUT
    Lyn Alfman, N8IMW - ASM

    I attended the Coshocton County Amateur Radio Association meeting, the Cambridge Amateur Radio Association meeting, and the Guernsey County Amateur Radio Emergency Service meeting and training session.

    I also attended a Guernsey County Emergency Management Agency training session on how to use the state WEBEOC program for the county in a disaster.  Four other Guernsey County ARES members attended as well.

    I did not attend any hamfests this month due to family obligations.  However, I will be attending the Dayton Hanvemtion at the Green County Fairgrounds in Xenia, so stop by the Ohio Section booth and say, “Hi!”

    I also attended several committee meetings and amateur radio meals.

    Remember to be “Radio Active”!


    ’73 Lyn, N8IMW  

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    ARES TRAINING UPDATE
    Jim Yoder, W8ERW – ARES Data Manager

    The month of May has not started out on such a fine note.  I drove up from Texas and did miss all the rain that had fallen earlier although high water and serious flooding was everywhere in parts of Missouri and Illinois.  I saw one home that was completely leveled by a tornado.  The temperature was certainly more to my liking along the way which has changed since I arrived to find two days of rain and low temperatures.  I have been accused of bringing it from Texas and that could be true.  It wasn’t warm when I left and I drove into much nicer weather along my way to Ohio.  I apologize and I have one more trip to make in a couple of weeks which will be in time to see the new Dayton Hamvention venue in Xenia this year.

    Add caption
    OSJ articles are being submitted early this month so they can be published prior to Hamvention.  By the time this edition of the OSJ reaches your desks, we should be looking at upwards of 750 members included in the database, 535 who have completed the four required NIMS courses and approaching 5,000 courses taken.  If you know our Section Manager, you will recognize his comment on your achievements, “Amazing”.  I echo his sentiments and commend each of you for your diligent work and commitment to this critical effort.  Training continues to be sent in daily and it is my pleasure to update the ARES Training Database with each of those new additions.

    Speaking of pleasure, there are a few things you can do to make this much easier for me.  I receive emails via the Section Manager, Section Emergency Coordinator and directly from those submitting training.  Often there are typos in name and Callsign.  I do verify everything with QRZ which can also have some errors.  Everyone should check QRZ to insure the information they have on you is accurate. The errors are usually found in your address information including your county.  Please do include your residence county and the county of your ARES activity when you submit training.  Certificates should be sent as .PDF documents.  Most any editor can read them in .PDF format and this saves a lot of work later when the certificates are stored and need to be retrieved at a later date.  The format I use is like this:  W8ERW-IS-00100.b.pdf. I understand not everyone will be able to do this, but if you can and will, this also saves a lot of time and potential errors. 

    Training can be submitted to either SM Scott YonallyN8SY@n8sy.com, SEC Stan Broadway N8BHLbroadways@standi.com or me, Jim Yoderw8erw@arrl.net.  Ideally, sending to all three of us will insure that your information is recorded in the database and is known to the Ohio Section officials who will be using the data.  So to recap, please include your callsign, tell us your residence and serving county (most are the same and a few are not) and if you can, format the file names for your certificates as follows, W8ERW-is-00100.b.pdf.  You will save us a lot of work and help prevent errors as your information is logged.

    Thanks again for your effort.  You are ahead of the curve and giving us all a lot to be proud of in Ohio.

    73 and see you in Xenia for Hamvention,

    As always, your questions and concerns are welcome.  Drop me an email at any time,w8erw@arrl.net.

    73 and Thank you,

    Jim W8ERW

    ****************************************************

    Ohio Repsonds

    Stan and I have finalized all the little details with the State of Ohio in preparation for all of you to get registered in the Ohio Responds database. I still have a few minor details to get out to you BEFORE you start registering, so be aware that this will very soon start up.

    For those of you who still have a funny feeling about all of this, Rhonda Meggitt, our Ohio Responds System Administrator, will be at Hamvention this year. She will have a booth in building 6. She’s all primed up and ready to take your questions about what all of this can mean to you, and the benefits that you gain by becoming partners with Ohio Responds.

    Ok, now that I’ve brought the subject up..  I want you to understand that you MUST be registered with your 4 completed NIMS courses in our statewide database BEFORE you attempt to register on the Ohio Responds website. So, for those of you who have been dragging your feet on getting your courses completed, I hope this will be the incentive for you to get started. How do I know if I’m on the list or not? Here’s the link to the list.  
    http://arrl-ohio.org/SEC/special/nims_roster.html  Don’t see your name on the list, and you’ve submitted your certificates? Contact me immediately!

    I also want you to know that we’ll be asking if you’ve had a federal or state background check within the last 5 years. Now don’t get all shook about this..!!  We are only asking this question to know who we could place in sensitive areas where this would be a requirement. It WILL NOT affect your ability to be a part of our Section of Ohio Responds. We will accept valid and current CCW licenses from Ohio as a background check. Most churches and schools do them if you are going to be exposed directly to children. Now, that’s just a few of the ways that you could have already had a background check done and maybe not realized it. There are many more.

    For those of you just starting out now that you have a real incentive, we have a webpage with all the information about how to get started.. http://arrl-ohio.org/SEC/training.html. This page contains a lot of information about what is needed. Each course takes about an hour or so to take, that’s really not much to ask now is it? You spent way more than that to get your Amateur Radio operators license!

    Now here’s a link that Ed, KE8ANU found that breaks it all down for you as to what the classes are:

    And here’s an additional link to the FEMA First Responder Catalog www.firstrespondertraining.gov  Thanks Michael, N8QHV

    I want to announce that our database guru Jim, W8ERW will be at the Ohio Section Booth at Hamvention with his computer. He’ll be able to look up you NIMS records right from there. Also, if you want to load up a disk or flash drive with your certificates on it, Jim will be able to upload that into the system right from there. You’ll need to scan your certificates either as a picture or as a .pdf and put them on a flash drive or disk. Jim will not be able to do any scanning from there, so please have that done before you get to the Hamvention.

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    LET'S TALK
    Scott Yonally, N8SY - SM

    Hey Gang,

    It’s only a few days away from Dayton!  Since we have this very big venue going on, we’re going to celebrate with DARA and their new location with a special “Handbook Giveaway” drawing. You’ll have to attend the Hamvention to get signed up for this so, only those who are in attendance will be eligible this time around. Now let me assure you that we are going to do some celebrating, this drawing will be for lots more than just one Handbook, there’s going to be lots of other things too. I even have some ARRL Gift Certificates to “Give Away” as well!




    Now, to enter the drawing you’ll need to stop by the Ohio Section Booth in Building 2 and fill out a simple registration form. There’s nothing else required (Oh.. this drawing is for EVERYONE, whether you live in Ohio or not!!)   The winners will be mailed their prizes at my cost after Hamvention. Make sure that you stop by the Ohio Section Booth and get registered. It’ll only take a couple of minutes to fill out the form!!




    Next on my list of items to talk about this month is our Affiliated Clubs Coordinator, John, KD8MQ. I’m sure that you’ve read above where John has had a change in direction in his personal life and has asked to be allowed to retire from his duties as Affiliated Clubs Coordinator. We will miss John greatly, as that he’s brought a lot to the table as ACC, but we do understand his course change in life. John, thank you so very much for all that you’ve done for me, the clubs in Ohio and the ARRL. Our hats are off to you my friend!

    John and I talked about his replacement and we both quickly came to one name, Tom Sly, WB8LCD. Tom’s had various duties with the Ohio Section for several years now. He’s very qualified to be the new Affiliated Clubs Coordinator for sure, as that he’s been one of the biggest driving forces in the Ohio Section to get clubs and club members involved once again!

    Tom has spoken numerous times at Ohio Section functions about how to get the membership and clubs involved. Tom also spoke, and represented the Ohio Section, at the 100 year Celebration back in 2014 in Connecticut!  Tom’s Bio appears below and I’m very sure that you’ll agree with me, he’s going to make a really great ACC for the Ohio Section.

    Are you getting those emails from me? If not, all you have to do is to “Opt-In” to receive them. Heck, just send me an email   n8sy@n8sy.com   I’ll get you added to the mailing list. There’s a link to do this on the Ohio Section website, it’s on the bottom left corner. For your convenience. Here’s a direct link to it:  http://arrl-ohio.org/forwarder/forwarding.html  I urge all of you to make sure that everyone, regardless of whether they are a League member or not, gets signed up for one of these options. You can always “Opt-Out” at any time if you feel this is not what you were expecting.  Did you know that the Ohio Section mailing list is almost 2,000 strong now? It is, and the ARRL emailing list for Ohio is over 3,600. We have 28,000 licensees’ in Ohio, let’s see if we can get this email out to all 28,000 by the end of the year!  Just let me know that you want added to the listing. I do get 8 – 10 new people every week! If you know of anyone that might be interested in getting my emails that isn’t already, please let them know!
    On that same subject, there’s another NEW – one question – questionnaire on the Ohio Section Website! This question is really important for me to know. It will only take about 2 seconds for you to answer it, and you can see how your answer stacks up with others instantly. If you haven’t done it yet, please do. I really want to hear from you. And, if you have a question that you’d like to see on our questionnaire, please send it to me! I have had several of you already do that and I would love to see more!!

    Are you a member of the ARRL?? If you aren’t a League member, this is a great opportunity to become one. Want more information on how to join? Here’s the link:http://www.arrl.org/membership-levels. There’s even a 90 day FREE trial that you can apply for if you’ve never been a member.. Got questions about being a member or what the League is all about? Send me an email n8sy@n8sy.com   I’ll be happy to call or write to you. We can even meet and have coffee if you’d like, and I’ll buy!!

    I’m sure all of you have heard me say that I’m always available for you, whether you’re an ARRL member or not. It’s true, and you can feel free to write or call me anytime. If you have any questions, concerns, or would just like to sit and chat awhile over a cup of coffee or something cold to drink, feel free to call or write me
    (419) 512-4445 or n8sy@n8sy.com  

    That’s going to do it for this month. I hope to see you all at your hamfests, club meetings or on the air!

    73, Scott, N8SY

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    Our Newest Affiliated Clubs Coordinator
    Tom Sly, WB8LCD

    I was born in 1953 and grew up on the West side of Cleveland in a little town called Parkview 
    (long since annexed into Fairview Park).  Somewhere around 1966 my folks moved to Aurora in Portage County – my first year of high school.  In that first year in Aurora I earned the rank of Eagle Scout and obtained my first ham radio license, as a novice WN8AAB.  My interest in ham radio was because of a neighbor in Fairview – Stan Hillman – W8FZS (SK).   Unfortunately, Aurora is a long way from Fairview for a 14-year-old kid, so my novice experience was pretty tough.  My license lapsed at the end of the second year.  Six months later I had a Tech ticket with the call WB8LCD.  My parents were 100% supportive of my hobby, but neither of them were involved or even interested in it, so they were not able to help me along too much.

    In 1971 I left Aurora for the University of Tennessee – as a new student in their EE program.  Unfortunately, I didn't apply myself as I should have and in my second year met my future wife and moved back to OH. My wife, Mary, and I have been married 43 years, we have 3 children and 2 grandchildren.  My oldest daughter, Jenny, is the only one who has ever gotten a license – she is KD8LIR.   I did finish college with a BSBA majoring in Finance from the University of Akron.  While I was in my Junior year I had the opportunity to get involved in the insurance business, started my own Independent Agency and have not had a job since I got out of college. I'm still in the insurance agency business along with my business partner WB8VYW, who I met at the Akron U  ham radio club.

    There are only two times in my life when I have not been an active ham – the 6 months when my novice ticket lapsed, and approximately 3 years while my son was in high school.  He was very active in the aquarium hobby and most of my spare time was spent cleaning fish tanks with him.  I think he was gone to college about 3 days when I had a new HF rig and got back on the air!  A few years later I had a group of ham “acquaintances” in Portage County and we decided to start a club that would be ACTIVE in the ham radio hobby and would concentrate on the FUN that ham radio has to offer. 

    Since my involvement with PCARS for the past 10+ years I've probably had more ham radio fun than EVER and have totally embraced Ham Radio as a lifestyle!  All of my friends are hams (well, not all, but most!)  I'm probably not the best ham, not the most interesting ham, definitely not the smartest ham, but, my passion for the hobby will equal or surpass most!  I'm a strong supporter of the ARRL – in fact I truly believe that without them our hobby would not exist today.  I'm also a strong supporter of local clubs – that is where new hams can get connected with others and learn about all the diverse activities that ham radio entails. 

    I'm excited for this opportunity to give back to the hobby that has been such a big part of my life.  I hope that together we can keep the hobby growing, and keep the hobby FUN!

    Please help me welcome Tom as our newest Affiliated Clubs Coordinator!!

    ****************************************************

    THE OFFICIAL OBSERVER COORDINATOR
    John Perone, W8RXX - OOC

    The Ohio OO's monitored a total of 1,507 hours in April.

    This is the largest number of hours in a long time.

    Believe it or not NO cards were sent. Either all was well on the bands or they were listening at the wrong times?

    Thanks to all the OO's that take their time to assist amateurs remain within the regulations.


    73, John, W8RXX

    ****************************************************

    SPECIAL EVENTS STATIONS

    06/03/2017 | Col. James M. Schoonmaker Museum Ships Weekend
    Jun 3-Jun 4, 1400Z-2100Z, K8E, Toledo, OH. Toledo Mobile Radio Association. 14.260 14.039 7.260 7.039. QSL. K8E Col. James M. Schoonmaker Team, P. O. Box 9673, Toledo, OH 43697. Operating at the National Museum of the Great Lakes on board the Col. James M. Schoonmaker. Operating June 3, 1400Z - 2100Z Operating June 4, 1600Z - 2100Z. www.tmrahamradio.org

    06/09/2017 | 2017 Tigers On The Air
    Jun 9-Jun 10, 1900Z-2000Z, K8TGR, Newton Falls, OH. Newton Falls Technology and Multimedia Club. 28.300 14.225 7.175 3.800. Certificate & QSL. NFHSTMC, 909 1/2 Milton Blvd., Newton Falls, OH 44444. Come on the air and help us celebrate the formation of the first Amateur Radio Club at Newton Falls Schools. We will be operating in a camp-out type environment for 24 hours. Local operators are invited to come and help us work the airwaves as well. As a club project, we plan on building a QRP repeater, with a 2m Frequency (146.6500) that we want to launch in a tethered weather balloon to see how many QSOs we can make that way as well. Find out more information on the website listed above.www.nfhstmc.org/index.php?p=13

    ****************************************************

    OHIO HAMFEST CALENDAR

    May
    05/19/2017 | Ohio State Convention (2017 Dayton Hamvention)
    Location: Xenia, OH
    Sponsor: Dayton Amateur Radio Association
    Website: 
    http://www.hamvention.org

    June
    06/03/2017 | Fulton County Amateur Radio Summer Swap
    Location: Wauseon, OH
    Sponsor: Fulton County Amateur Radio Club
    Website: 
    http://k8bxq.org/hamfest

    06/10/2017 | Union County ARC TailGate & TrunkFest
    Location: Marysville, OH
    Sponsor: Union County Amateur Radio Club
    Website: 
    http://ohiohams.net

    06/17/2017 | Milford Hamfest 27th Annual
    Location: Milford, OH
    Sponsor: Milford Amateur Radio Club
    Website: 
    http://www.w8mrc.com 

    We now have a complete listing of hamfests in Ohio on the website. Go to: http://arrl-ohio.org/hamfests.html  to see everything that is currently scheduled, including the Great Lakes Division Convention!

    ****************************************************

    A final – final.. 

    Today is May 15th, in 1905 Las Vegas Nevada was founded. In 1981 Len Barker of Cleveland pitches perfect game vs Toronto, and it’s National Chocolate Chip Day!!!

    Now, on that note... Amateur Radio is exciting and a lot of FUN. It’s also a learning experience for everyone! Share your enjoyment and learning experiences with those just coming into Amateur Radio!! 

    eof..




  3. In this issue:

    -> SKYWARN TRAINING
    -> THE TECHNICAL COORDINATOR
    -> AFFILIATED CLUB COORDINATOR REPORT
    -> THE SECTION EMERGENCY COORDINATOR
    -> THE PUBLIC INFORMATION COORDINATOR
    -> THE SECTION TRAFFIC MANAGER
    -> OUT AND ABOUT
    -> FROM THE EDUCATIONAL OUTREACH ASM
    -> ARES TRAINING UPDATE
    -> LET'S TALK
    -> THE OFFICIAL OBSERVER COORDINATOR
    -> SPECIAL EVENT STATIONS IN OHIO
    -> OHIO HAMFEST CALENDAR
    -> MY FINAL

    ****************************************************
     
    SKYWARN TRAINING – WHERE CAN I GET IT..

    Hey Gang, it’s time to start thinking of either renewing, or obtaining your Skywarn training for 2017. Do you know where the training is being made available?

    Here’s are links to all weather offices that cover Ohio. Depending on where you live will depend on which weather office you’ll want to look at. It’s your choice as to which area you want to go to, but just be sure to get that training in!






    You can also find these links on the Ohio Section ARES webpage under Skywarn too 


    Hey speaking of getting that all so important weather information... Did you know that all the National Weather Service Bulletins for Ohio are posted on the Ohio Section Website? They are, here’s a link to that page.. http://arrl-ohio.org/nws.html    

    This page lists all weather bulletins that effect Ohio and are posted directly by the National Weather Service.

    ****************************************************
     
    THE TECHNICAL COORDINATOR
    Jeff Kopcak – TC

    Hey gang,

    Since the last couple months have been feature articles, this month will be odds-n-ends.

    Maker Spaces & Faires
    I got positive comments on last month’s article about Makerspaces and Maker Faires.  I hope it gave clubs and groups ideas to get younger makers into our hobby.  Not only did the January edition of QST have the article on Maker Faires but it was the focus of ARRL CEO Tom Gallagher - NY2RF’s note in April.  I’m happy to say these types of things are on the radar of the League and they’re focusing efforts on this new generation of Ham Radio operators.  According to Tom, the ARRL plans to be at the three national maker events this year.

    AllStar
    I learned the creator of AllStar Link, Jim Dixon - WB6NIL, passed away at the end of last year.  Jim is the creator of “app_rpt” which allowed the open source PBX system, Asterisk, to function as a repeater controller.  In doing so, created one of the most impressive and versatile solutions for VoIP (Voice over Internet Protocol) in ham radio.  Having played around with AllStar on my own node, nodes can be linked together directly through the public Internet, private network, point-to-point network, or really any combination of methods.  Hubs are systems with greater bandwidth allowing for multiple simultaneous connections – like “reflectors” on IRLP or “conferences” on Echolink.  One of my buddies who spoke with Jim commented that he was the smartest, nicest guy you’d meet and [he] would be doing well if he retained even half of what they talked about.  Jim will be missed but the AllStar project will live on.  AllStar Link: https://allstarlink.org/, Raspberry Pi & BeagleBone image: https://hamvoip.org/

    Fldigi & Flmsg
    W1HKJ and the contributors to the Fldigi project have been busy (http://www.w1hkj.com/).  A new major release of Fldigi was made available at the end of March.  This brings both Fldigi & Flmsg up to version 4.0.1.  Technical Specialist Bob – K8MD messaged me about the update.  My response: ‘crap, I just updated the screen shots from the previous changes the weekend before’ (3.22.x).  I was hoping there were no new changes.  Of course there were!  Now my newly updated instructions are dated again!  Those instructions were getting stale because of significant program option changes since I made them available about two years ago.  They are on my site (up to Fldigi v3.23.21 and Flmsg 4.0.1) at http://www.k8jtk.org/2015/04/16/getting-started-with-fldigi-including-flmsg-and-flwrap/.  Written for the LEARA Digital Net, they do focus on NBEMS operation.

    Check them out and do some practice nets.  From experience, it’s best if ALL participating stations are using the same program versions.  There are fewer issues with forms because newer forms are included in later Flmsg versions that were not in earlier ones and everyone can be on the same page when going through settings.
    Over that same weekend, I wrote up tutorials and hacks you can do with Flmsg.  We’ve all been there.  You missed receiving part of an Flmsg message because of being off frequency (radio or waterfall), in the wrong mode, or not paying attention.  The issue is quickly corrected and most of the message is still received.  However, Fldigi doesn’t know what to do with the form because some of the headers are missing.  When headers are missed, Fldigi can’t open the form because the message won’t checksum.  The checksum is used to verify the entire message was received.  I wrote up a tutorial how to recover a partially missed message: http://www.k8jtk.org/2017/03/25/recovering-a-partially-received-flmsg-message/.

    The last is more of an Flmsg hack.  When an Flmsg form is received, NBEMS standard is to have the ‘open in browser’ option enabled.  As expected, this will open the received form in the default browser.  Many don’t realize that any web programming code (HTML, CSS, JavaScript) sent as part of the form will be interpreted by the browser.  This means you can send clickable links, link to an image, redirect to websites, and change background colors.  Just about anything that can be done on a webpage can be sent as part of an Flmsg form and rendered when opened in the browser.  Find out how at http://www.k8jtk.org/2017/03/25/flmsg-forms-rendered-as-web-pages/.  Standard squid disclaimer for both: this is for fun and not NBEMS compliant.

    OpenSpot
    If you have an OpenSpot hotspot, there was a major firmware update for the device in February and subsequent update in March to bring the current version to 108.  The changelog has – in the neighborhood of – 80 (yes, eighty) fixes and enhancements.  Previously, I wasn’t using this device to run the Ham Nation D-STAR After Show net.  However, since they added a nice web interface with call log and export feature, it’s now my device for running the net.  If you’re looking for a ham radio digital mode hotspot, check out the SharkRF OpenSpot: https://www.sharkrf.com/products/openspot/

    One of the SharkRF connector options is their own IP Connector Protocol Server (https://github.com/sharkrf/srf-ip-conn-srv).  The Connector Server is used to create a network of OpenSpot devices and it can be implemented in other hardware/software as it is open source.  Like AllStar, it can accept public internet connections, run on a private network, or mesh network.  I haven’t tried but it may even compile and run on a Raspberry Pi.

    The Connector Server repeats any digital transmission sent to it.  All modes can even be simultaneously connected.  D-STAR connected clients will only hear D-STAR transmissions because there is no transcoding of D-STAR data streams.  DMR and Fusion streams can be transcoded.  DMR streams are transmitted to modems set to DMR and converted by the OpenSpot to Fusion for Fusion modems.  Similarly, a Fusion stream is transmitted to modems sent to Fusion and converted to DMR for DMR modems.

    I’ve setup a Connector Server that is open and there to mess around with.  In the OpenSpot configuration:
     * In Connectors: under Edit Connector, select “SharkRF IP Connector Client.”
     * Click “Switch to selected.”
     * Once changed, enter your TX/RX frequencies.
     * Server address: srf-ip-conn-srv.k8jtk.org
     * Port number is in ‘Advanced mode’ but is the default, 65100.
     * ID, use your CCS7 DMR ID.
     * No password.
     * Enter your Callsign.
     * Click “Save.”
     * In the Modem options, select the desired mode.

    The dashboard is: http://srf-ip-conn-srv.k8jtk.org/.  The server will remain online if it continues to see use.  Otherwise, it could disappear at any time without use :)

    Ham Nation 300 (#HamNation300)
    Last but certainly not least, yours truly has been on the planning committee for the Ham Nation 300thspecial event.  Ham Nation is an audio and video podcast recorded live and available at https://twit.tv/shows/ham-nation.   The program records at 9:00 p.m. eastern time every Wednesday evening.  Following each episode are the “after show nets” which are round tables discussing the show or ham radio.  These nets include: 20m, 40m, D-STAR, DMR, and Echolink.

    After each 100 episodes, a special event is planned to commemorate another 100 episodes.  In the past, these have been geared around HF.  The show is not only for the General/Extra class licensees and not everyone has the ability or desire to operate HF.  This year’s festivities have something for everyone including the chance to make digital contacts for the special event and a summer long challenge.

    Ham Nation 300thspecial event runs the week following Dayton, May 24-31, 2017.  Full details can be found on any of the 1x1 special event callsigns on QRZ or at https://www.hamnationdstar.net/2017/04/05/ham-nation-300-special-event/.  Please join in and help make this event successful.  Follow it on social media: https://twitter.com/hashtag/hamnation300and https://www.facebook.com/HNonTwit.

    That's about it for this month. 

    Thanks for reading and


    73… de Jeff – K8JTK

    ****************************************************

    THE AFFILIATED CLUBS COORDINATOR
    John Myers, KD8MQ - ACC

    Hi everyone, welcome to springtime <Crossing fingers>. As I’m writing this on the 10th, the week ahead looks much better than the snow that we all woke up to just a few days ago.

    I spent Saturday morning at the Cuyahoga Falls Hamfest. I was happy to see a great turnout this time. I’ve heard that Hamfests are dying, and some I’ve been to on the last couple years do seem to be on the decline. But, Cuyahoga Falls appears to be bucking that trend.

    I got to see a lot of friends there this year; one was Ken, KA8OAD. Ken is the Summit County EC, and has been keeping busy with DMR. He’s been doing club programs about this mode; most recently at the PCARS group (Portage County ARS).

    I ran into Ken at the Silvercreek meeting about a month ago and was telling me about a project that he and Rick, N8NOQ had completed. I’ll let Ken tell you about that.

    “The University of Akron had an analog UHF repeater system that was barely used. I purchased a new UHF DMR repeater and with the help of Rick Nemer (N8NOQ), we replaced the clubs UHF analog machine with the new UHF DMR repeater. Rick then purchased some of the “inexpensive” Tytera MD-380 DMR HT’s for the students to use with the new repeater. Having new digital technology at their disposal and the ability to contact other operators around the country, and around the world for that matter, on nothing more than a low power, inexpensive HT helped the students get excited about using this “new” technology and now the repeater is seeing increased use both by the students as well as the local amateur radio community here in Akron. “ – Ken, KA8OAD

    The MD-380 that Ken mentions can be had for a little over a hundred bucks at Universal. Granted, “inexpensive” depends upon your budget, but it’s a heck of a deal.
    One of my favorite things at a Hamfest is wandering around talking to folks. You never know just who you’ll run into. At Cuyahoga Falls, I saw Dave, KD8NZF, and his wife, Nancy, KD8QNY. I didn’t get to stop and talk to them, as they were on their way out for an appointment. But, I received some E-mails from Dave recently.
    If you read my column last month, you saw that the Red Cross “Lake to River” chapter was doing a special event to celebrate Red Cross Month. Dave was one of the team that brought that together.

    He told me that on one of the days that the station was running, they had a visit from a local Girl Scout troop. As luck would have it, they happened across Jim, K1GND in Rhode Island while the girls were there, and Dave put them on the air with Jim. Of course, Jim being the gracious Elmer that he is, talked to not one or two of the girls, but every one of them. You can bet they left with a positive impression of Amateur Radio that day!

    Lastly, I’d like to congratulate the Massillon ARC for reaching their 90th Year. Since this this is their anniversary year, they are building a replica of a 1927 Amateur station. Watch for more from Massillon as well.
    With that, I’ll say 73.

    DE KD8MQ

    ***************************************************

    THE SECTION EMERGENCY COORDINATOR
    Stan Broadway, N8BHL

    Ohio Conference

    If you missed the Ohio ARES Conference, you missed something!  The room was full, the speakers were knowledgeable and interesting, and the stage was set for ARES to continue to build on the success we’ve had.   Many thanks to our presenters for their time, and knowledge:

     * Matt Curtin, KD8TTE  (ARESMAT and the changing face of traffic in amateur radio)

     * Bryan Hoffman, KC8EGV (A new mode for Ohio? Winlink)

     * Dick Miller, Field Operations Manager, MARCS, and Steven Garwood, Infrastructure Spec. III,
        MARCS (What’s on the other side of the MARCS radio?)

     * Sean Miller, KD8RBM, Delaware County HS/EMA Director, President Ohio EMA Director’s
        Association  (How can we work together?)
      
    I think it would be fun for everyone to examine the potential of Winlink as a viable communications tool in Ohio. It has a lot of potential, and it’s a proven mode. 

    We did talk about training and NIMS during the conference. I slipped a cog in my presentation about getting credentialed…I’m sorry to introduce confusion.  We are this year setting the standard that every ARES member needs to have completed the four NIMS courses. We’re doing a * great * job in getting to that goal, I thank you very much for taking this to heart.

    Want to view the presentations?  Here’s a link to them: http://arrl-ohio.org/SEC/sec-conf-2017.html

    NVIS DAY

    Our next fun event is April 22, Ohio ARES NVIS Day!  The concept is the same: see how many stations we can contact in Ohio and neighboring states, and determine which antenna works the best for you in close-range communication.  Obviously a key component of that is the ability to reach The Sarge at Ohio EOC from your location.   We will be emailing log and antenna forms to each EC, and they will be available on the ARRL-Ohio website for any interested people or groups. You do NOT have to be an official ARES group to participate, we want this to be a fun operating event for all amateurs.

    Because the band conditions are, shall we say questionable, we are adding additional bands to our operating event: 160 and 60 meters.  So you have your choice: 160,80, 60, 40 meters are all up for consideration.  We will have anchor stations for comparative reports.

    Here’s a link to the NVIS Day Scoresheets: http://arrl-ohio.org/SEC/default.html

    Keep things going!

    We all have an individual responsibility to make good our commitment to ARES.  You wouldn’t sign up for a basketball team without being willing to practice. Likewise, we all have the responsibility to practice our radio art, and that involves attending meetings, participating in drills and public service events, and staying trained in weather and other emergencies. We got an early start on severe weather in Ohio this year.  Please stay in the habit of turning on your radio to listen to a Skywarn net near you any time there is a watch or warning. 

    Remember the necessities of a directed net:
      Net control decided who talks when. 
     
      Rule 1: Listen- you’ll hear much of what you want to know by listening.
     
      Rule 2: refer to rule 1.

     * When you have something, or are checking in, say your callsign and WAIT to be recognized!
     * Make sure you say your call at the end of your message, to keep legal. NCS should allow for that.
     * Be ready to talk about our great hobby to a friend!  Share the fun!

    You can view the SEC’s monthly reports on the website.. http://arrl-ohio.org/SEC/default.html


    73, Stan, N8BHL

    ****************************************************
     
    THE PUBLIC INFORMATION COORDINATOR
    John Ross, KD8IDJ

    2017 Ohio Section Newsletter Contest

    In case you’re counting…or wondering…about the deadline for the 2017 Newsletter Contest…it’s just  two and a half months away!

    Remember, to be included, we need two copies of your club’s newsletter by June 30th or notification when your web page is updated.

    I’m printing and organizing the newsletters now but please keep sending them. The judges will pick two to review for each club.

    I know I’ve said this before but each year it just keeps getting better. What I’ve seen so far this year is outstanding and I know the judges will be impressed.

    If you have any questions, please call or email me anytime.

    DMR

    With the help of our Section Manager Scott Yonally, I am finally up and running on DMR…Digital Mobile Radio. Believe me it’s an exciting new “mode” and pretty inexpensive to get started.

    A couple of hours after my radio was programmed I was able to check into a nationwide net with my handheld radio all from the comfort of our four seasons room!

    The audio quality was great and the operating procedures are really no different than any analog contract.

    Trying, or experimenting, with new and different ways to communicate is what amateur radio is all about. We have been the test bed for most all forms of radio communications that have used is the past and are still in use today. DMR should be no different. I would venture to say we are ahead of the curve right now for DMR.

    There is more info about DMR on this website and I hope you take some time to dig in.

    FirstNet

    A big announcement about week ago came from AT&T ( my employer) that, finally, a nationwide communication system would be built exclusively  for first responders…FirstNet

    This is a big deal. The whole concept began right after 911. Communications during that crisis were, to say the least, difficult. Many repeaters were on top of the World Trade Center buildings. The internet of the day was mainly dialup and our cell phone weren’t as smart, or as well connected, as what they are today.

    Here are some quick points about FIRSTNET and why it’s important:

     * 70,000 emergency personnel need communications everyday
     * Over 10,000 networks are currently in use
     * FirstNet will provide 20 MHz of secure spectrum that will link all first responders with voice, 
        data, and video
     * Rural villages and townships will benefit by having instant access to nationwide help
     * Total cost for FirstNet is $46.5 billion dollars.


    The actual build-out of FirstNet will start later this year.

    A lot more information about this project can be found on the internet at:

    PIO NET

    And while we’re on the subject of nets, I was reminded that about two years ago I wanted to have statewide PIO Net.

    Well, logistics got in the way but now, maybe, I can start to put together the PIO Net.

    I’m open for ideas but my first thought is trying to use DMR. I know not every area has DMR but I’ll do some research to see where we are covered…or don’t have coverage… and put together a plan.

    There may come a time when it’s necessary to have all of the PIO’s involved in an emergency. It would good for us to start now to make that work. A net would also give us a great platform the talk about what we do, how we do it and pass along any “frustrations” we have about media coverage.

    So, light me up…let me know what you think!

    That’s it for this month…remember the Dayton HAMFEST is just about a month away. I’ll be at the Ohio Section booth inside the ARRL area. Stop by and say hello.

    73,

    John, KD8IDJ

    ****************************************************
     
    THE SECTION TRAFFIC MANAGER
    David Maynard, WA3EZN - STM

    News from the Ohio Single Sideband Net says that we had an election of the leadership of the net.  Mike Hayward KC8WH has been reelected to be the net manager.  Dave Krutsch KD8MSZ will be the Assistant Net Manager pending later deployment. Ted Morris NC8V was elected to the Advisory Board for a three-year term to serve with Dick Fletcher N8CJS and Stan Sutton KD8KBX.

    I would like to take this time to thank these men and all the members who check into the OSSBN and the local traffic nets for their support of the nets and handling traffic so efficiently. You can check into the Ohio Single Sideband Net on 3.9725 starting at 10:30 AM, 4:15 PM and 6:45 PM daily More information and useful links can be found on the OSSBN website www.ossbn.org.

    While on the subject check into some of these Ohio HF traffic nets:

    HF CW NETS             NET TIMES               FREQUENCY             NET MANAGERS
    Buckeye Early            6:45 PM                      3.580                           WB8YLO
    Buckeye Late              10:00 PM                    3.590                           WB9LBI
    Ohio Slow Net            6:00 PM                      3.53535                       W8OLO

    Now to the Ohio State Conference Dayton Hamvention. The general focus for many hams next month is the Dayton Hamvention.  The Ohio State Conference will be held at the Hamvention® this year.

    This is the largest Hamvention in the county and draws participants from all over the world. Unless you have been living under a rock you should know by now about the changes to the 2017 Dayton Hamvention.  This year the Hamvention will not be at held at the Hara Arena location.

    The Hamvention has been moved to the Green County Fairgrounds located at 120 Fairgrounds Road, Xenia Ohio 45385.  Hamvention will be held May 19, 20 and 21, 2017 at the Greene County Fairgrounds and Expo Center opening at 9 am each day. For more information check these websites:
    Hamvention 2017 website: http://hamvention.org/

    The Official Greene County Fairgrounds website with map: 120 Fairgrounds Road, Xenia, OH 45385

    There will be many commercial vendors and hundreds of individual selling equipment and supplies in the flee  market. Inside the buildings you will also find a presence of the ARRL with many individuals from headquarters at their booth.  There will also be many presentations, forums and VE testing during this three-day event.  There is just too much going on the cover it all adequately in this forum. For more information go to the link above.

    The next big ham event after Dayton will be Field Day the last full weekend in June. It is not too early to be thinking and planning for this event.  If you have a favorite location for Field Day, you need to have it reserved NOW! I hope to have more about field day next month.

    Now some information on personal protection.  Tornadoes, fires and carbon monoxide are three of the things that are important for you to consider when thinking about your personal and family safety.

    One of the easiest and most effective ways to protect yourself and your family from fire is to install smoke alarms in your home. Smoke alarms can warn you of a fire when you are asleep, busy or in a different part of the house from where the fire is. They provide you extra warning time when you are awake, and they will wake you if a fire occurs while you are asleep.  Smoke alarms are inexpensive. Battery-operated residential smoke alarms are available for less than $10. Alkaline batteries that can last for a year are available for a few dollars. Some alarms are now available with long-life lithium batteries. These alarms, which typically sell for about $20, have lithium batteries that can last for up to ten years.

    Carbon monoxide (CO) has been called the "silent" and "invisible killer" because it's a scentless, colorless, and tasteless toxic gas. It's the number one cause of death due to poisoning in America. Any time you burn something—like gasoline, natural gas, wood, oil, propane, or charcoal—carbon monoxide is released into the air. In outdoor spaces, this usually isn't a health hazard because there is enough area to dissipate and particles never amount to a toxic level. The danger comes when carbon monoxide is released in a contained area like your home, RV, or garage.  It can be released with car exhaust or a leaky furnace flue.  A gas or charcoal grill should never be used inside a house, garage or other structure.

    You won't know from taste, smell, or sight that carbon monoxide is poisoning you, but your body will. If you have carbon monoxide poisoning, you may feel dizzy, become nauseous or throw up, develop a headache, get confused, and/or pass out. Death can be prevented by having a carbon monoxide detector.

    If you do not have a smoke detector and a carbon monoxide detector on each floor of your home, you run a safety risk.  The detectors are not expensive and are easy to install.  If you contact your fire department you may be able to get installation assistance.

    Another important safety device is a NOAA weather alert radio. NWR transmitters broadcast on one of seven VHF frequencies from 162.400 MHz to 162.550 MHz. The broadcasts cannot be heard on a simple AM/FM radio receiver. There are many receiver options, however, ranging from handheld portable units that just pick up Weather Radio broadcasts, to desktop and console models which receive Weather Radio as well as other broadcasts.

    SAME, or Specific Alert Message Encoding allows you to specify the particular area for which you wish to receive alerts. Most warnings and watches broadcast over NOAA Weather Radio are county-based or independent city-based (parish-based in Louisiana), although in a few areas of the country the alerts are issued for portions of counties. Since most NWR transmitters are broadcasting for a number of counties, SAME receivers will respond only to alerts issued for the area (or areas) you have selected. This minimizes the number of “false alarms” for events which might be a few counties away from where you live.

    Since power outages often occur during storms, having a receiver with battery backup can be crucial. However, unless you have a portable unit which you will use away from other power sources, an AC power connection is recommended to preserve battery life. For more information on weather radio use visit the NOAA weather radio website: http://www.nws.noaa.gov/nwr/info/nwrrcvr.html

    As to why you should have a weather radio available here are a few facts.  We have already had tornadoes this year in Ohio.  Our friends to the west and south have had multiple outbreaks of damaging storms and tornadoes.  It would behoove us all to prepare now for what could be an active storm season here in Ohio.

    Tornadoes develop from severe thunderstorms. They are usually preceded by very heavy rain and/or large hail. A thunderstorm accompanied by hail indicates that the storm has large amounts of energy and may be severe. In general, the larger the hailstones, the more potential there is for damaging winds and/or tornadoes.

    Peak tornado season in Ohio is generally April through July, and they usually occur between 2 pm and 10 pm. Tornadoes have also happened in Ohio in the months of January and December so it is apparent that they can happen at any time of the year in Ohio.

    Ohio has already held its tornado awareness drill and many areas have had or have scheduled their weather spotters classes.  For those that need reminding of the dangers of sever weather and tornadoes I bring you some valuable information.

    Another good source of useful information during severe weather is you area Skywarn VHF radio net.  Ask other operators in your area for the frequency that is used in you area.  Many of the Skywarn nets are held on your local two-meter repeater.

    That all for is month,

    You can view the STM’s monthly report on the website.. http://arrl-ohio.org/stm/stm.html

    73,

    David WA3EZN

    ****************************************************
     
    OUT AND ABOUT
    Lyn Alfman, N8IMW - Assistant Section Manager

    I attended two Cambridge Amateur Radio Association (CARA), two Guernsey County ARES (GCARES), and one Belle Valley American Legion Amateur Radio Club meetings.  I gave a brief talk to GCARES on the duties and obligations of a PIO for the County and/or ARES during a disaster as well as everyday duties of an amateur radio club PIO.

    The February 25 CARA and GCARES meetings were postponed until March 4, so members could take advantage of State of Ohio Department of Public Safety Emergency Management Agency Individual Assistance Damage Assessment 2-hour workshop offered at the Muskingum County EMA.

    CARA had 12 members (including me) attended a SKYWARN training session on March 8.

    I published the CARA Communicatornewsletter and placed a monthly safety tip article in the local newspaper for the Guernsey and Noble Counties Long Term Recovery Committee (GNCLTRC). And as the GNCLTRC PIO, I attended its quarterly meeting along with the Guernsey County Emergency Coordinator Dick Wayt, WD8SDH.

    Remember to be “Radio Active”!


    ’73 Lyn, N8IMW  

    ****************************************************

    FROM THE EDUCATIONAL OUTREACH ASM
    Anthony Luscre, K8ZT

    Educational Outreach
    This month I have a project for you. It is something you can build. It is easy and cheap. But there is one catch— I want you to give it away to a young person or teacher! Even better yet build it with them. I would also encourage your local Amateur Radio Club take this own as a club project.

    The project- The Clothespin Key.
    Even though proficiency with Morse Code is no longer required for getting an Amateur Radio license, young students often find code a fun activity. Fancy Code Keys can run in the hundreds of dollars and even a cheap plastic based “bargain” key is $12 to $20 each and I want you to give it away! So enter the Clothespin Key costing less than $2.00

    The Clothespin Key was designed with price and durability in mind. In addition, it can allow the young person to assemble their own key.

    Here's a picture of the original prototype


    Here's a pictorial diagram





    I have prepared a complete detailed list of steps, with pictures, on how to build the key. For purposes of brevity and to not fill up this month’s Section News here is a link to the complete project -tiny.cc/c-key



    To go along with the key here are a few links for online resources on Morse Code- www.ztlearn.com/radio-kids (look in the left column for the Morse info, but please feel free to browse the whole page when you have time), oh and by the way share the page with youngster you give the key to!


    73, Anthony, K8ZT

    ****************************************************

    ARES TRAINING UPDATE
    Jim Yoder, W8ERW/5

    ARES Training Update
    We are now at last feeling the warmer weather of spring and I am enjoying that a bunch.  As many of you may know, I left Ohio for Texas late in 2015.  Hopefully I will be back here in the great state of Ohio in time to take in the Dayton Hamvention in Xenia this year.  I have been looking at real estate here in Fremont for the last month or so and as soon as I find the place I want, I will finish moving and with any luck, start putting my station and equipment back together.  Texas, at least in the HOA area I have been in, is just is not conducive to any HF activity.  The noise floor is awful and those HOA restrictions make it nearly impossible to erect a decent antenna for HF work.  I am also anxious to return to my roots and the many relationships that I left behind in Ohio.  Ohio and the Ohio Section make a wonderful combination to return to and all of you make that possible. 

    I am also pleased to report your ARES training efforts are showing outstanding results and the numbers have continued to grow daily.  We are now are over 700 members who have reported their NIMS courses and others to the database.  Over 500 of those have completed all of the required courses.  The total number of classes reported is now over 4,700.  These are outstanding results and as I continue daily the logging of your training, I am amazed by the dedication and effort this represents.  Keep up the good work.  You are making Ohio look like the biggest and the best ARRL Section. 

    Upkeep of the ARES Training Database is a frequent activity.  Not only are the daily addition of members and training, but call sign changes and license upgrades are also being entered as I receive them.  Each entry is verified with QRZ and I record an email address if one is available as well.  As you may imagine, although your call is unique, names not always are.  QRZ helps insure I get the right information.  It does help a great deal when name, county and call are included when you send your training documents. 

    There are approximately 20 of you who have completed 3 out of the 4 required NIMS courses and close to 30 who have reported 2 of the 4 courses.  Now I will admit to being among these almost done it folks and I will finish up mine as soon as I get settled back in Ohio.  So, let’s all get busy and get all 4 required NIMS courses completed and entered into the database.  We have been fortunate for a long time now and have not had a widespread and devastating weather event.  Other things are possible also and when something does happen, we must be prepared to respond.  NIMS training will be required and it will give you the knowledge to provide communications support in the most effective manner.  NIMS provides the structure and organization that insure everyone knows what to do and how.  Past experiences show how important this becomes when the disaster overwhelms us. 

    Again, I want to say Thank you for your effort.  Training and being prepared is a lot of work and is never finished.  The dedication of Ohio Amateurs through ARES is a significant part of what we as Hams can and often do to support our communities.  I am fortunate to be able to see all of this grow and it is a real pleasure to be able to do so.  Thanks to each of you.

    As always, your questions and concerns are welcome.  Drop me an email at any time, w8erw@arrl.net.

    73 and Thank you,

    Jim W8ERW

    ****************************************************
     
    LET'S TALK
    Scott Yonally, N8SY - Section Manager

    Hey Gang,

    Have you seen that the NEWEST “Handbook Giveaway” drawing on the website yet? To enter the drawing all you need to do is fill in a couple of boxes on the form.. (your name and email). That’s you need to do to be entered into a drawing to win a 2017 ARRL softcover Handbook. There’s nothing else required (Oh.. You do need to be a resident of Ohio to win..)   The winner will be mailed the Handbook at my cost. This is being offered just to see how many folks are really checking in on the website. Got the idea? Best of luck to you!!

    Are you getting those emails from me? If not, all you have to do is to “Opt-In” to receive them. Heck, just send me an email   n8sy@n8sy.com   I’ll get you added to the mailing list. There’s a link to do this on the Ohio Section website, it’s on the bottom left corner. For your convenience. Here’s a direct link to it:  http://arrl-ohio.org/forwarder/forwarding.html  I urge all of you to make sure that everyone, regardless of whether they are a League member or not, gets signed up for one of these options. You can always “Opt-Out” at any time if you feel this is not what you were expecting. 

    On that same subject, there’s another NEW – one question – questionnaire on the Ohio Section Website! This question is really important for me to know. It will only take about 2 seconds for you to answer it, and you can see how your answer stacks up with others instantly. If you haven’t done it yet, please do. I really want to hear from you.

    Are you going to Dayton this year? Just wanted you to know that if you do look for the Ohio Section Booth within the ARRL Field Services Section in building 2. I’ll have the NEW Ohio Section Banner on display and we’re going to celebrate too.. Since the Special Dayton Giveaway was such a huge success last year, we’re going to repeat it.. I have a number of ARRL Gift Certificates, Handbooks and a few other items that we will be giving away. All that you have to do is stop by our booth and sign up! That’s it.. The winners will be announce on Monday, May 22nd and the prizes will be shipped out then. I’m looking forward to seeing everyone and good luck to all of you!!

    Are you a member of the ARRL?? If you aren’t a League member, this is a great opportunity to become one. Want more information on how to join? Here’s the link:http://www.arrl.org/membership-levels. There’s even a 90 day FREE trial that you can apply for if you’ve never been a member.. Got questions about being a member or what the League is all about? Send me an email n8sy@n8sy.com   I’ll be happy to call or write to you. We can even meet and have coffee if you’d like, and I’ll buy!!

    I’m sure all of you have heard me say that I’m always available for you, whether you’re an ARRL member or not. It’s true, and you can feel free to write or call me anytime. If you have any questions, concerns, or would just like to sit and chat awhile over a cup of coffee or something cold to drink, feel free to call or write me
    (419) 512-4445 or n8sy@n8sy.com  

    That’s going to do it for this month. I hope to see you all at your hamfests, club meetings or on the air!

    73, Scott, N8SY

    ****************************************************
     
    THE OFFICIAL OBSERVER COORDINATOR
    John Perone, W8RXX

    Here are the March numbers.

    Total Hours 1332 monitored

    1 - Good OO card sent

    0 - OO cards sent

    73, John, W8RXX

    ****************************************************
     
    SPECIAL EVENTS STATIONS

    04/22/2017 | 5th Annual Earth Day Celebration
    Apr 22, 1400Z-2000Z, W8PRC, Parma, OH.

    Parma Radio Club. 14.245 7.195.
    QSL. W8PRC, 7811 Dogwood Lane,
    Cleveland, OH 44130.

    Contact us to celebrate Earth Day.
    We'll be operating solely on power from Ol' Sol.

    ****************************************************

    OHIO HAMFEST CALENDAR

    04/29/2017 | Jackson County Amateur Radio Club Hamfest
    Location: Jackson, OH
    Sponsor: Jackson County Amateur Radio Club

    04/30/2017 | Athens Hamfest
    Location: Athens, OH
    Sponsor: Athens County Amateur Radio Association

    05/19/2017 | Ohio State Convention (2017 Dayton Hamvention)
    Location: Xenia, OH
    Sponsor: Dayton Amateur Radio Association

    We now have a complete listing of hamfests in Ohio on the website. Go to: http://arrl-ohio.org/hamfests.html  to see everything that is currently scheduled, including the Great Lakes Division Convention!

    ****************************************************
     
    A final – final.. For those of you who haven’t filed your taxes yet..  Tax Day falls on April 18, 2017. That's the deadline for filing taxes on income earned in 2016. Usually, April 15 is the day taxes are due, but in 2017, that falls on a Saturday. And on Monday, the District of Columbia celebrates Emancipation Day, which is normally April 16, but that's a Sunday. Emancipation Day affects taxes the same way federal holidays do. Therefore, the tax deadline is pushed out to the following Tuesday, April 18, giving taxpayers three extra days to file their returns.

    A little history if you please.. 
    Today is April 14th and 1865 US President Abraham Lincoln is shot by John Wilkes Booth at Ford's Theater in Washington.

    Today is also.. Lookup at the Sky Day, International Moment of Laughter Day and Reach as High as You Can Day..  Now, on that note... Amateur Radio is exciting and a lot of FUN. It’s also a learning experience for everyone! Share your enjoyment and learning experiences with those just coming into Amateur Radio!! 

    eof..






  4. The Ides of March Edition!!

    In this issue:

    -> SKYWARN TRAINING
    -> SEVERE WEATHER SYMPOSIUM
    -> OHIO QSO PARTY RESULTS
    -> THE TECHNICAL COORDINATOR
    -> AFFILIATED CLUB COORDINATOR REPORT
    -> THE SECTION EMERGENCY COORDINATOR
    -> THE PUBLIC INFORMATION COORDINATOR
    -> THE SECTION TRAFFIC MANAGER
    -> OUT AND ABOUT
    -> FROM THE EDUCATIONAL OUTREACH ASM
    -> ARES TRAINING UPDATE
    -> LET'S TALK
    -> THE OFFICIAL OBSERVER COORDINATOR
    -> SPECIAL EVENT STATIONS IN OHIO
    -> OHIO HAMFEST CALENDAR
    -> MY FINAL

    ****************************************************

    SKYWARN TRAINING – WHERE CAN I GET IT..

    Hey Gang, it’s time to start thinking of either renewing, or obtaining your Skywarn training for 2017. Do you know where the training is being made available?

    Here’s are links to all weather offices that cover Ohio. Depending on where you live will depend on which weather office you’ll want to look at. It’s your choice as to which area you want to go to, but just be sure to get that training in!






    You can also find these links on the Ohio Section ARES webpage under Skywarn too 


    Hey speaking of getting that all so important weather information... Did you know that all the National Weather Service Bulletins for Ohio are posted on the Ohio Section Website? They are, here’s a link to that page.. http://arrl-ohio.org/nws.html    

    This page lists all weather bulletins that effect Ohio and are posted directly by the National Weather Service.

    ****************************************************

    SEVERE WEATHER SYMPOSIUM
    (from Michael Schulsinger, N8QHV)

    The Ohio State University MetClub is hosting the 21st Severe Weather Symposium.  The symposium is free, though there is a charge for parking at the Ohio Union on OSU's main campus. 

    The 2017 symposium is scheduled for Friday, March 24th.  Lunch is available in the Union, or at restaurants across High Street.

    I have attended most of these and only regretted one year - the year a tornado outbreak plowed across northern Kentucky, southern Indiana and southern Ohio during the conference!  The link to RSVP ishttp://u.osu.edu/metclub .

    Hope to see everyone there!

    ****************************************************

    OHIO QSO PARTY RESULTS
    (from Jim, K8MR)

    The results of the 2016 Ohio QSO Party are now available at the OhQP web site,www.ohqp.org.  Thanks to all who participated, and we hope you will join us again for the 2017 event, on Saturday, August 26.

    ****************************************************

    THE TECHNICAL COORDINATOR
    Jeff Kopcak – TC

    Hey gang,

    Ever heard of a makerspace?  I hadn’t until one of the podcasts I follow, Hak5, talked about the concept and visited a couple.  Following that, the “QSO Today” podcast (episode 75) talked about a connection to ham radio and the January 2017 edition of QST gave ideas for clubs participating in “Maker Faires.”  Makerspaces, sometimes referred to as hackerspaces, hackspaces, or fablabs are shared resources for creative DIY types where people can gather to create, invent, and learn.  Sound familiar?  It should.  Those are the foundations of Amateur Radio.

    “These spaces combine manufacturing equipment, community, and education for the purposes of enabling community members to design, prototype and create manufactured works that wouldn’t be possible to create with the resources available to individuals working alone” states makerspace.com.  Makerspaces are a relatively new idea with a leaning toward younger individuals.  Spaces can be setup by a group of individuals, nonprofit company, or for-profit company who host spaces in rented buildings, schools, universities, libraries, or anywhere else the community decides to meet.
    The business model is similar to that of a gym membership where users of the space pay a monthly membership fee - somewhere in the neighborhood of $30-$50.  This gives members access to the facility and its resources.  Those resources may include: machine shop, wood shop, welding shop, electronics lab, 3D printer, laser engraver, art supplies, blacksmithing, molding and casting, robotics lab, CAD software, glass blowing, space for experiments, and even entrepreneurship classes.  The possibilities are endless.  This model works because purchasing even one piece of equipment will run an individual more than the cost of a membership fee.  Experts and instructors are available to help others learn how to use the equipment – on-site or through training classes.

    When you think about it, hams have been doing this for decades: borrowing radios, borrowing test equipment, and pulling knowledge from the larger community to accomplish a task.  The community, as a whole, is a much more powerful resource when each individual shares their own knowledge with the community and builds encouragement for others.  Look at all the aspects of the ham radio hobby.  Some hams are good at soldering, surface mount, climbing towers, programming, tuning repeaters, fabrication, digital operation, software defined radios, Internet linking, portable operation, award chasing, DX, CW, QRP, building antennas – no one ham can do it all.  It’s the reason most of us join clubs.  Contribute to the community and learn from others.

    Getting ham clubs affiliated with makerspaces will promote the maker mentality of ham radio in a space where people who make stuff are already gathering.  A club could hold licensing classes or a build project in the space.  Others would see those sessions posted around the space, promoted on the website or Facebook group, or in an email to the makerspace members and community inviting others to join in.  One club in our section is doing just that.  The Wood County Amateur Radio Club has partnered with the BiG Fab Lab in Bowling Green, Ohio.  I am a Life member of the WCARC and joined this club while attending BGSU in 2002.
    About the BiG Fab Lab from their website:

    BiG Fab Lab, LLC is an open-access 24/7 workshop (or “Maker Space“) that serves people in the Northwest Ohio region. We provide the equipment, classes, private storage and studio space, and personal assistance to a membership community that allows them to prototype and develop any idea they can imagine. We are targeting people, schools, and businesses who have an interest in hands-on skills in a variety of crafting, design, manufacturing areas, and business incubation. We also provide retail space so that our members can test market and sell their creations! … Could you imagine the power of bringing business, students (K-12 & university), and community members together into one place? No walls, no silos, each sharing and collaborating with others to innovate, educate, and collaborate. Perhaps we could transform our region and maybe the world!

    Located in the Woodland Mall off North Main Street, the $40 membership fee gives access to: a wood shop, machine shop, engravers, 3D printers, plotters, laser engravers, an arts and crafts space for ceramics, large cafeteria style meeting room, and they’re not done yet!  Training classes are held for each piece of equipment in the lab.  Once a member is trained and demonstrates the ability to safely operate the equipment, an achievement is added to their member swipe-card giving them access to that equipment 24/7.

    The BiG Fab Lab will be featured in an episode of the PBS show “The American Woodshop.”  Scott Phillips, host of The American Woodshop, and the crew from WBGU-TV (a former employer of mine), taped episode 2409 set to air this month (March 2017).  If you missed the show or it’s not carried by your local PBS station, past episodes can be found athttp://www.wbgu.org/americanwoodshop/ and look for “Watch Episodes” near the bottom.

    In one of my return trips to visit the club, I got a tour from Bob Boughton – N1RB and Bob Willman – WB8NQW to see how this partnership came to be.  Mark Bowlus, Founder and Director of the BiG Fab Lab, wanted to strengthen the presence of electronics in the lab.  Doing some research, he reached out to the Wood County Amateur Radio Club.  Over the past few years, the two have partnered and are developing a relationship promoting electronics and ham radio.  The club established a station at the Fab Lab which and will include VHF/UHF station and HF station.  Of course, the work is never done and more is being added all the time.

    WCARC couldn’t be happier about the cooperation they are receiving from the Fab Lab.  To date, there have been two ham radio licensing classes; one Technician and one General.  A second Technician class was started in February of this year.  The turnout has been better than expected because the BiG Fab Lab is promoting these classes on their calendar and Facebook group.  Participants come as far away as Michigan.  Students are charged $30 for the training manual, exam fee, and a monetary fee charged by the lab to use the space.

    Future plans include building out the electronics area with test equipment.  The club hopes to offer regular electronics and license training classes.  Once the training classes are in place, the Fab Lab has offered to waive the lab membership free for WCARC members!  Additionally, the club plans to use the station as a base of operations, being more out in the public, in case of an emergency.

    Issues the WCARC had to address are: legal agreements and unauthorized access to the station.  Legal agreements are incredibly important.  Their agreement spells out and covers both the lab and club should either entity disband, dissolve, or go out-of-business; for example, what happens to the Club’s equipment.  A club seeking to do the same would need legal counsel or know one willing to do pro bono work to write up a legal agreement.

    The BiG Fab Lab is a 24-hour facility.  Having a station control operator at all times is unreasonable.  The club, with the help of a partnering company, developed a method to allow the equipment to be turned on for anyone to listen.  To inhibit transmitting, the microphone port will be disabled by default.  Once a lab member becomes licensed or holds a valid amateur license, that achievement will be added to their access card just as if they were qualified on any other piece of equipment.  When the member swipes the card with that achievement, the microphone port will be enabled allowing that licensee to transmit.

    Having access to a full shop is an amazing resource and opportunity to get ham radio out in front of like-minded people.  If a similar shop is not nearby, opportunities for clubs to participate in “Maker Faires” are available too.  The article in QST describes them as “one part festival, one part flea market, one part rock concert.”  Makers are brought together in a hamfest-like environment to display their projects including: 3D printing, electronics and microcontrollers, robotics and drones, music and dance, homemade electric vehicles, art and textiles, cooking, science, woodworking, and blacksmithing.

    One theme that kept popping-up in the article: focus on making, not operating.  Visitors are not interested in watching a ham making contacts or ‘get licensed’ pamphlets.  Take an indirect approach to ham radio.  Makers want to see Wi-Fi and Bluetooth used for wireless data links, long-range data systems (data modes, packet), microcomputers and inexpensive tablets, ADS-B, weather satellite receivers, spectrum analyzers, cable and antenna sweepers, and SDR – to name a few.  Makers are already familiar with these technologies.  Promote these topics – which lead to discussions on getting licensed.  Explain ways ham radio can add value to their projects.  A new wide area network technology called LoRa has makers really excited to be able to send bidirectional wireless data between 0.3 kpbs and 50 kbps over long ranges.  Hams have been doing similar networking with packet and mesh.

    Each year, do a different project to keep people coming back.  Some examples of projects include demonstration on the relationship between wavelength, frequency, and changes in VSWR.  Explain how communication efforts in a recent natural disaster could have benefited by building an NVIS antenna for a particular band.  Have a display prepared on antenna resonance with some hands-on activities.  An SDR, antenna, and computer could show different signals on a spectrum display.  Bring lots of Raspberry Pis, Arduinos, and circuit boards.  Be patient as it may take some time to get a maker licensed.  Who knows, they may become your club’s most active member.

    I challenge clubs to contact these organizations and form a partnership with a local makerspace or participate in a maker faire.  I found a number of maker spaces throughout the section including the Columbus Idea Foundry, dubbed “the largest makerspace on the planet” by Tech Crunch.  Doing some searching on the Internet leads to maker faires in different parts of the state.  Not only is the Wood County Amateur Radio Club pioneering in the maker arena, the Alliance and Massillon Amateur Radio Clubs are involved with the University of Akron Wayne College 3 (UAWC3) Lab.

    Efforts to get ham radio into schools for younger adults is great. I think the buy-in from administrators is far too high because it does not fit into their method of teaching to the standardized tests. I’ve been a part of conversations where the feeling that recruitment in scouting programs has not been as favorable as anticipated.  Efforts could be better utilized by sharing our hobby with makers, who tend to be younger adults and college aged students with a similar mindset.

    Below are links related to makerspaces and faires:

    Wood County Amateur Radio Club:http://wcarc.bgsu.edu/


    Ohio Hacker/Makerspaces:https://wiki.hackerspaces.org/Ohio




    That's about it for this month. 

    Thanks for reading and


    73… de Jeff – K8JTK

    ****************************************************

    THE AFFILIATED CLUBS COORDINATOR
    John Myers, KD8MQ - ACC

    Hi everyone, well, another month, another few days closer to springtime.  .  .  At least according to the calendar. It’s said that only in Ohio can you go from flip-flops to mukluks in less than 24 hours. As I’m putting the finishing touches to this months column, I’m also keeping my eye on a Winter Weather Advisory that we are under for the next few days.

    Here at my QTH, the NPOTA withdrawal is beginning to subside, and plans are being made for my next obsession. How about yours? If you feel “stuck”, and need some direction, check out pg 14 of the March issue of the Radiogram. Tom WB8LCD has penned a pretty interesting article on what to do when your feel like your Amateur Radio pursuits are at a standstill. You can find it by going to theNewsletter page on the Portage County ARS (PCARS) website. The URL for the website iswww.portcars.org.

    After last months OSJ went out, I got the following e-mail from Jack, W8TEE. Jack is the VP of the Milford (OH) ARC

    “Hi John:
    I've been licensed continuously since 1954 and keeping and expanding membership has always been a problem. Our club gives the FCC exams every month and, by far, the Tech license is the most common exam taken. This month, 15 sat for the exam, and all but two were Techs. Our meeting starts about a half an hour after the exam period ends and we extend an invitation to attend. Few do.

    I did manage to talk to one new Tech who is not going to renew or upgrade. When asked why, his response was: "It's no different than my cell phone." I think the problem is that Techs buy an HT and only use the local repeater. They never experience what HF has to offer or any of the many other aspects of our hobby. Cost is one factor, as many are EE students at the university. Indeed, one major motivation for my March, 2016, QST article was to show how you can build an inexpensive, yet viable, HF rig. 

    Our club feels strongly enough about this that we have purchased a "loaner rig", complete with transceiver, PS, and antenna, that members can borrow to experience the HF bands. True, only 10M has a Tech phone section, but at least they can listen to what they are missing. I think our next club build will be the BITX40, a 7W SSB rig which now has an LCD display and VFO for $59. Things like this are a step in the right direction: We need Techs to experience what HF has to offer and thwart the "cell phone" analogy.

    If other clubs are doing things to address this issue, I sure would like to hear about it.

    73,
    Jack”

    Thanks Jack, I would also like to hear what other clubs are doing about this issue. By the way, the article that Jack mentions is titled “a Modular 40 Meter CW Transceiver With VFO”, and appeared in the March, 2016 issue of QST (pg 39).

    I’m right between two speaking gigs as I write this. Last night, I was honored to speak to the Mahoning Valley ARA, and hear about all that they have coming up. Then on the 16th, I’m looking forward to speaking to the Silvercreek ARA about “Life After NPOTA”.

    Mahoning Valley ARA will be doing a two week Special Event with the Lake to River chapter of the American Red Cross. According to 1x1callsigns.org, they are celebrating Red Cross month. They’ve secured the callsign of W8R from March 20, through April 3rd. It’s not in the March, or April issues of QST, but by the time you read this, it might be on ARRL.org. I’ll also be including it in an upcoming issue of theMonday Morning Message (mondaymorningmessage.net).

    The Ohio ARES NVIS day is coming up next month. According to Scott, N8SY who spoke to the Massillon ARC at their March meeting, this year’s NVIS Day will occur on April 22nd. I’m betting there will be more information on this event elsewhere in the Section journal.

    Las month, I mentioned Tom Gallagher’s editorial “Get On The air With History” (Pg 11, March, 2017 QST). In keeping with the subject of that editorial, the Alliance ARC is talking about doing a rather unusual SES sometime this year. They are looking at commemorating the Great Alliance Squirrel Hunt of 1832. I bet most communities have some kind of quirky historical event that would make for a fun Special Event. Check with your local Historical society. Make sure to e-mail me your ideas. I just might include them in a future column.

    And, I think that’s about it for this month. Hopefully next month’s column will find us enjoying better weather.


    73 DE KD8MQ

    ***************************************************

    THE SECTION EMERGENCY COORDINATOR
    Stan Broadway, N8BHL

    And… here we go!

    ARES service is never over- but we do achieve a bit of a break over the winter months. Now, in March, it’s time to get going again. There are already some major events (one being “The Arnold” in Columbus, the largest sporting event in the world) and more on tap for early spring. YOUR help is most appreciated as we look for volunteers in our various events. Thank you for participating!

    Make sure you have a trip to Marion Tech set for April 1! That will be our annual Ohio ARES Conference, and we plan to have some excellent speakers and subjects for you all!  Of course we’ll have some business updates for the Ohio Section, and answer some of your questions that have come in over the winter.  One of the  biggest stories in amateur radio this year is the system to relay message traffic across the country- formerly a province of the ARRL’s National Traffic System, a new player (Radio Relay International) and some political issues have brought this whole world into the spotlight. Catch up on what’s happening, and how we can make use of whichever system for ARES!  Another topic will be MARCS and trunked radio systems. Many, if not most, of us have operated the state system radios, but what goes on behind the scenes? What exactly is this animal?  We want to review the strides which have been taken for the Ohio Department of Public Safety’s credentialing system, and what it means to you. We’ll hear from our number one customer- the EMA Director, with a talk by the President of the Ohio EMA Director’s Association Sean Miller, KD8RBM.  We’ll take the pulse of how amateur radio is regarded across the state, and what we can do to serve our agencies.  This should be a “not-to-be-missed” meeting for all EC’s! It is open to ALL ARES members, so c’mon in!

    NVIS antenna day is scheduled for April 22. In addition to 40 and 80 meters, we want to add 160 and 60 meters (a good 160 antenna should also operate on 60). With the band conditions in the trash, we need to work up alternative bands and plans to maintain communications across the state!  These new bands should make for some interesting antenna construction projects, so get your teams busy!!  We’ll circulate more details to the EC email list, so make sure you as an ARES member are getting these emails forwarded by your EC!

    Thank you so much for being diligent in getting your NIMS training! Our numbers are looking great! If you haven’t taken a brief period to do these online courses, please do so!  Our standards are that these four courses (100, 200, 700, 800) should be completed if you wish to participate in an actual emergency setting such as an EOC or shelter.

    We are slow, but moving bit by bit at The Sarge – the new station room and equipment are completed, and we most recently have pulled hardline for the antenna runs to the new room. Connectors and testing should take place soon, and we’ll be back on the air from our new facility. Operation continues from our temporary location at the EOC in the meantime. The wheels of government can be ~very~ slow sometimes!

    I hope you have seen reports of the massive flooding across the country. That type of situation can arise quickly- and it can (and did) happen in Ohio!  The number one mantra is just like scouting, “Always Be Ready!”

    You can view the SEC’s monthly reports on the website..  http://arrl-ohio.org/SEC/default.html


    73, Stan, N8BHL

    ****************************************************

    THE PUBLIC INFORMATION COORDINATOR
    John Ross, KD8IDJ

    2017 Newsletter Contest
    T-Minus 3 months…until the deadline for the 2017 Ohio Section Newsletter Contest…I can hardly believe it myself.

    Thanks for all for all of the great entries so far and there still is time. Remember we need two newsletters…from different months…for your club to be eligible. If your newsletter is web-based  we need a notification when the new editions are ready to be viewed.

    The awards will be presented at the meeting in August at Columbus Hamfest.

    Keep up the good work…it’s making a difference!

    Severe Weather Training
    Another blast from the “it’s hard to believe” department. The first three months of this year have showed us severe weather can happen anytime…even in winter! Now, we’re about ready to enter tornado season with a couple of twisters already under our belts.

    This year’s severe weather training from the National Weather Service(NWS) has already started…and my recommendation is you find one to attend. It’s good for  a lot reasons…just a good refresher, news of any changes at the NWS, and a lot of folks who would like to become Amateur Radio operators! I know here in Central Ohio I go every year, with my portable radio in tow, and I get questions for a lot folks how to get licensed. We are fortunate enough to have a representative from our local club address the crowd and talk about Amateur Radio’s involvement and how to get started.

    This is  great service the NWS offers and they take our involvement seriously. I know many clubs are active in this already…never hurts to have more.

    The folks who run the weather nets are truly ”weather gods” for the work they do. They are well trained, qualified and committed to gathering and sending the correct information to the NWS.

    The season officially get under way on March 22…two days after the start of Spring! Listen for the sirens at 9:50 AM…and join a weather net!!

    College Amateur Radio Clubs
    I’m still getting emails from my article a couple of months back about radio clubs at universities around Ohio and the country in general.

    It’s a big deal and a big push to help the clubs that already exist and to help college clubs that are struggling.

    A great success story is right here in Ohio at Case Western Reserve University in Cleveland….a ham radio club with 150 members!!


    I’ll be on my way up there in a few days to get a first-hand look at the operation…pictures and all. Watch for great story next month!

    Here’s a link to the rules.. http://arrl-ohio.org/pic_page/pic.html


    73,

    John, KD8IDJ

    ****************************************************

    THE SECTION TRAFFIC MANAGER
    David Maynard, WA3EZN - STM

    MARCH CAME IN LIKE A LION

    Here we are in the first days of March and Ohio has already seen summer like severe weather. There have already been seven confirmed tornadoes in Ohio and that is before spring arrived.  With the warm winter it is possible that we may have a hot summer with an active tornado season.  I encourage everyone whether you are a ham operator, wife or child to take advantage of any and all weather spotter training that you find available. 

    And as I now work to finish this article the weather advisory has changed to a snow storm which may be the biggest storm in March history. Snow and winds are predicted for Ohio with possible snow fall on the east coast predicted to a foot or more. 

    Steps to prepare for severe weather or any other disaster should be started now!  Remember that when severe weather or a disaster arrives for you and your family it is already too late to plan.

    This is the most severe reports for any 48-hour period in the U.S. in almost six years.  Almost 60 tornadoes and just over 1,000 total reports of severe weather tore through parts of the Midwest, South and East from February 28 through March 1, 2017, in what was the largest severe weather outbreak since the late spring 2011.  National Weather Service surveys have confirmed at least 59 tornadoes occurred in 11 states from Kansas and Iowa to Michigan to Tennessee during the outbreak.  There were seven tornadoes in Ohio.

    Multiple rounds of severe weather moved through our region during the early to mid morning hours on March 1, 2017. These storms produced all types of severe weather -- tornadoes, damaging winds, large hail, and flash flooding. And all of this prior to the following weather exercises.

    Spring Severe Weather Awareness Week - March 19-25, 2017
    Statewide Tornado Drill - Mar 22, 2017 9:50 am
    Flood Safety Awareness Week - Mar 19-25, 2017
               Tornado Safety

    A tornado is a violently rotating column of air extending from the base of a thunderstorm down to the ground. Tornadoes are capable of completely destroying well-made structures, uprooting trees, and hurling objects through the air like deadly missiles. Tornadoes can occur at any time of day or night and at any time of the year. Although tornadoes are most common in the Central Plains and the southeastern United States, they have been reported in all 50 states.  The seven reported as being in Ohio in March proves that we must all be prepared.
    If you know what to do before, during and after a tornado, you will minimize your risk of injury and increase your chances of survival.
    I am going to quote (copy) some information form this website since I can not do as good a job as this website has done, thank you State of Ohio.

    If you need more information just Google Tornado and you can also be overwhelmed with the information available, the stories being told and the pictures of the total destruction of businesses, homes and communities. Final Words: PREPARE NOW!!

    The Federal Emergency Management Agency has made files for the Ready Campaign's publications available to the public to download at no cost.  Are You Ready, an in-depth free guide to Citizen Preparedness is available from FEMA.

    This particular book consists of 206 pages book chock full of useful information presented in a format that is easy to read with photos, charts, and checklists. It can be used as a reference guide or even as a step-by-step manual for taking protective measures to secure your homestead against disaster.

    With that in mind, here is how to get a print copy of the ARE YOU READY guide for free.

    In the body of the email indicate you would like a copy of “Are You Ready? An In-depth Guide to Citizen Preparedness (IS-22).” Be sure to include your mailing address (a PO box is okay). A short time after sending the email, you should get an order acknowledgment. Your copy arrived in about six to ten weeks.  You can also call the FEMA publications office at 800-480-2520 with the same request.
    If you would like an electronic copy as well, here is download link:


    Just keep in mind that any publication related to preparedness, whether free online or purchased is only as good as the follow-through you take to ensure you have done the best job you can to acquire the skills and supplies to prevail following a disruptive event. Finally, if you are like me, you have amassed a huge collection of electronic books, manuals, brochures and documents related to preparedness. Just keep in mind that there may be times when a print book may become a lifesaver.

    General Preparedness Hints
    * Make a family emergency communication plan and include your pets.
    * Identify an out of town emergency contact to coordinate information with family/friends.
    * Check on neighbors.
    * Keep an emergency kit wherever you spend time: home, car, work etc.
    * Download the FEMA App and set up local alerts
    * Listen to local officials by radio, TV, or social media and take action.
    * Practice your preparedness plans with a drill or exercise.
    * Take a first aid class so you can help until first responders arrive.

    >>Tornado Facts..


    As the severe weather season approaches, take some time during Severe Weather Safety Awareness Week to make a safety plan for your family, friends, neighbors and co-workers. Planning ahead will lower the chance of injury or death in the event severe weather strikes.

    Tornadoes develop from severe thunderstorms. They are usually preceded by very heavy rain and/or large hail. A thunderstorm accompanied by hail indicates that the storm has large amounts of energy and may be severe. In general, the larger the hailstones, the more potential there is for damaging winds and/or tornadoes.

    The most violent tornadoes are capable of tremendous destruction with wind speeds of 250 mph or more. Damage paths have exceeded the width of one mile and 50 miles long. Tornadoes generally move from southwest to northeast, but have also been recorded traveling in any direction. The forward speed of a tornado varies from 30 mph to 70 mph.

    Peak tornado season in Ohio is generally April through July, and they usually occur between 2 p.m. and 10 p.m. One year, though, an EF1 tornado occurred in Fairfield County at 6 in the morning - which proves that tornadoes can happen at any time, during any season.

    >>Fujita Tornado Damage Scale - By Category

    The Enhanced Fujita Scale is a set of wind estimates (not measurements) based on damage. It uses

    three-second gusts estimated at the point of damage based on a judgment of eight levels of damage.

    Enhanced Fujita Scale
    OPERATIONAL EF SCALE
    EF # = 3-Second Gust (MPH)
    0 = 65-85
    1 = 86-110
    2 = 111-135
    3 = 136-165
    4 = 166-200
    5 = Over 200

    NOTE: Prior to February 1st, 2007, tornadoes were rated according to the “F” (Fujita) scale rather than the newer “EF” (Enhanced Fujita Scale). Click on the Storm Prediction website
    http://www.spc.noaa.gov/efscale/ for additional information regarding the “F” and “EF” scales.

    > Tornado Safety Tips

    whether practicing in a tornado drill or sheltering during a warning, the Ohio Committee for Severe Weather Awareness encourages Ohioans to DUCK!

    D - Go DOWN to the lowest level
    U - Get UNDER something
    C - COVER your head
    K - KEEP in shelter until the storm has passed

    Take responsibility for your safety and be prepared before a watch or warning is issued. Meet with household members to develop a disaster plan to respond to tornado watches and warnings. Conduct regular tornado drills. When a tornado watch is issued, review your plan – don't wait for the watch to become a warning. Learn how to turn off the water, gas and electricity at the main switches or valves.

    Despite Doppler radar, tornadoes can sometimes occur without any warning, allowing very little time to act. It is important to know the basics of tornado safety. Know the difference between tornado watches and tornado warnings.

    Tune in to one of the following for weather information: NOAA Weather Radio, local cable or television (Ohio News Network or the Weather Channel), or local radio stations.

    If you are a person with special needs, register your name and address with your local emergency management agency, police and fire departments before any natural or man-made disaster.

    NOAA Weather Radio has available an alerting tool for people who are deaf or have hearing impairments. Some weather radio receivers can be connected to an existing home security system, much the same as a doorbell, smoke detector or other sensor. For additional information, visit:
    http://www.nssl.noaa.gov/users/wood/public_html/NWR/spc-nds-nwr.html.

    The safest place to be during a tornado is a basement. If the building has no basement or cellar, go to a small room (a bathroom or closet) on the lowest level of the structure, away from windows and as close to the center of the building as possible.

    Be aware of emergency shelter plans in stores, offices and schools. If no specific shelter has been identified, move to the building's lowest level. Try to avoid areas with large glass windows, large rooms and wide-span roofs such as auditoriums, cafeterias, large hallways or shopping malls.

    If you're outside or in mobile home, find shelter immediately by going to the lowest level of a nearby sturdy building. Sturdy buildings are the safest structures to be in when tornadoes threaten. Winds from tornadoes can blow large objects, including cars and mobile homes, hundreds of feet away.

    If as a last resort you cannot quickly get to a shelter, get into your vehicle, buckle your seatbelt and try to drive to the nearest sturdy shelter.

    If you experience flying debris while driving, pull over and park.  Choose to either stay in your vehicle, stay buckled up, duck down below the windows and cover your head with your hands, or find a depression or ditch, exit your vehicle and use your arms and hands to protect your head. Never seek shelter under highway overpasses and bridges.

    What about your family?  Here are some items you can do now to be prepared in the future.

    Sit down with your family members and decide how you will get in contact with each other in an emergency.

    Once you figure this out, document the contact information on both a master sheet and on wallet sized cards to be carried by all family members. This document will become your “Family Communication Plan” and it will form the cornerstone of your family emergency plan. It will list all family members, their date of birth, and other important information. Include a photo for each person as well as any important medical information. Also include a contact number for an out of town contact person.

    Determine a meeting place where you will meet in the event you can not get home. This may be your workplace, the home of a parent or relative, your church or even at a school if there are children involved. Whatever you decide, you will need at least three possible locations.

    Determine the best evacuation routes from your home or workplace to the safe meeting places. Then take the route and make sure it is accurate and that you understand the directions.

    Prepare a list of all workplaces along with the address, telephone number, and closest evacuation location in the event getting to the pre-designated meeting place is not possible.   Also prepare a list of all schools that are attended by your children along with the address, contact names, and telephone numbers. Contact the schools now to learn about their own emergency evaluation policies and procedures.

    Prepare a list of your doctors and your veterinarian along with their telephone numbers. Include a list of medical conditions and prescription medications that are being taken.

    Prepare a list of your insurance policies, including the carrier, the telephone number for claims, and the policy number itself. Include health insurance, homeowners or rental insurance, life insurance policies.

    Be aware, however, that phone lines and cell service may not be functional following a catastrophic disaster. Although a valuable tool, do not count on your phone to be the sole mode of communication following a disaster. If you text, you might want to consider a “texting tree.” Texting is usually available even when cell service is down.

    Store all of the information you have carefully compiled in multiple locations. For example in a preparedness binder, On a flash drive that you carry with you, In your desk drawer at work  or in an email attachment sent to yourself at oneof the email services that you use.

    You can view the STM’s monthly report on the website..  http://arrl-ohio.org/stm/stm.html

    73,

    David WA3EZN

    ****************************************************

    OUT AND ABOUT
    Lyn Alfman, N8IMW - Assistant Section Manager

    I attended the Zanesville Amateur Radio Club meeting, and a Cambridge Amateur Radio Association (CARA) officers’ meeting.

    The CARA and Guernsey County Amateur Radio Emergency Service meetings were postponed, so members of both groups could attend a two-hour Individual Assistance Damage Assessment Workshop training session by the Ohio Department of Public Safety that was recommended by the Guernsey and Muskingum County Emergency Management Agency Directors Gerry Beckner and Bo Keck.  Eight CARA members attended.

    The postponed meetings are scheduled for March 4. The election of 2017 officers will take place at the CARA meeting.

    President Bruce Homer, N8JMK, was finally able to present the CARA Amateur of the Year for 2016 to Bob Howell, AC8VW, at the February 23 weekly amateur radio lunch.  The announcement appeared in the February 26 Daily Jeffersonian.  Congratulations, Bob!

    The CARA Communicator (quarterly newsletter), usually sent out on March 1, will be sent out after the election results of the March 4 meeting.  Thank you for your patience.

    Remember to be “Radio Active”!


    ’73 Lyn, N8IMW  

    ****************************************************

    FROM THE EDUCATIONAL OUTREACH ASM
    Anthony Luscre, K8ZT

    Educational Outreach

    This month I want to focus on two items-

    1. The 2017 Teacher's Institute on Wireless

    2. My New Web Pages for Students & Teachers (www.ztlearn.com/diy-r):
        a. Kids Radio Zone
        b. Teacher Radio Zone
        c. DYI/Maker Zone

    First as mentioned previously the 2017 Teacher's Institute on Wireless -

    Please Pass this on to Teachers in Your Area--
    “The  ARRL has announced its 2017 Teachers Institute on Wireless Technology schedule. This summer's sessions will be held July 17-21 in Dayton, Ohio, and July 24-28 at ARRL Headquarters in Connecticut.

    The deadline to apply is May 1.

    These expenses-paid, intensive professional development opportunities offer educators training and resources to explore wireless technology in the classroom using Amateur Radio.

    Topics covered in the TI-1 Introduction to Wireless Technology include basic electronics, radio science, microcontroller programming, and basic robotics.

    Educators in the TI-1 class will also learn about Amateur Radio, take part in a hidden transmitter hunt, and see demonstrations of Amateur Radio satellite communication. Students will build and program their own simple robots. An Amateur Radio license is not required to take the TI-1 class. 

    For more information visit- www.arrl.org/ti or have them contact me atk8zt@arrl.net

    The second item is a new set of Web Pages I have created for Students (of any age) and Teachers.
    Often you may want to pass on information to others on the wonders of Amateur Radio but are often at a loss for one resource to point them to. I have designed these pages for that purpose. In addition to Amateur Radio information they also contain a wide variety of links on Electronics, STEM (Science Technology & Math), Radio History, Satellites & Space and much more. I have added this wide variety of resources because I have often seen that the route to recruiting a new ham can go through a variety of paths and interests.

    On the student page, “Kids Radio Zone” (www.ztlearn.com/radio-kids) I have tried to add a number of fun resources that can appeal to a wide age range of students. Some of the highlights include- Boys Life’s Online Morse Code Machine, Icom’s series of free comic books, Zak & Max, featuring Amateur Radio and electronics, a wide variety of online radios around the world that can be remotely tuned to allow students to listen to radio without a an antenna or even a radio, online satellite trackers, DIY/Maker links and more.

    On the teacher page, “Teacher Radio Zone” (www.ztlearn.com/radio-teachers) I have included resources for teaching students about Radio & Electronics, Information on ARRL Teacher Resources and more.

    On the DIY page, “DIY/Maker Zone” (www.ztlearn.com/radio-teachers) I have included a number of resources to draw in Makers and then provide connections between the Makers movement and Amateur Radio.

    All three pages are still being tweaked, so please take a look and let me know if you have any problems with links, questions or suggestions. If you have a personal or club website that you manage, I encourage you to add links to these pages. If you write for a club newsletter please include the information about the pages and addresses. Finally, if you have a student, know a student or teacher, have a family member or friend that might be interested I have designed these pages for you to share with them to introduce/encourage a possible new ham.


    73, Anthony, K8ZT

    ****************************************************

    ARES TRAINING UPDATE
    Jim Yoder, W8ERW/5

    ARES Training Update

    The numbers from last month are not handy as I write this, but I can tell you the response during the past several weeks has been amazing.  Ohio Section Hams have been completing NIMS courses daily.  Currently we have 677 members reporting, 459completing all four of the NIMS core courses required and a total of 4,463 course certificates recorded.  Those numbers will have already increased by the time you read this in the Ohio Section Journal.  This is a very positive accomplishment for the Ohio Section and you are making it happen with your dedication and support. 

    Don’t bother doing the math.  The numbers won’t match and that is the result of many of you reporting more than the four required courses.  That is a good thing and it represents the high level of participation by Hams in Ohio.  Many of you not only enjoy Amateur Radio but also work professionally in public service or do so as volunteers.  Thank you for your service as well as for your support of Amateur Radio. 

    We have been quite fortunate in Ohio for a number of years and not having widespread or frequent weather situations that require ARES activation.  That could change at any time and recent events elsewhere seem to indicate we are perhaps overdue for something significant.  Obviously none of us wish for that to happen, but we must be ready and trained to respond when called on to do so.  Regular drills, practice and being prepared personally are key factors that are essential.  NIMS training is also now required by many of our served agencies and the State of Ohio EMA. 

    The four required courses are the ICS-100, 200, 700 and 800 level training offered free online by FEMA.  Information is available on the ARRLOHIO.org  website and I encourage all of you who have not already done so, to have a look and get involved by taking this training.  You can complete each of these four courses in approximately 2 hours.  The information is very well presented and is designed to give you a good understanding of how a disaster response will be structured and how we as Amateurs will fit in to the organized response.  You will find the information is logical and very easy to understand.  When you complete a course, you will be issued a certificate indicating your passing. 

    Let’s continue the momentum and get everyone involved with ARES trained.  When you do complete a course, please make sure your local Emergency Coordinator is given a copy to be included in the database.  The easiest way to do so is send an email with an electronic copy of the certificate.  A copy of the FEMA transcript is also good and might be especially suited for those of you who have already completed your four courses or more.  The idea format is a .pdf file including the course number and your call.  The file structure I use to store them is as follows:  W8ERW-IS-00100.b.pdf, or W8ERW-Transcript.pdf.  Don’t worry, if you don’t have the means to do so, we will rename them before adding them to the database.

    It is also appropriate to mention here that all this data is not public and will only be used or shared with the appropriate officials when necessary.  When ARES is activated and we are asked to support a disaster effort, officials who require credentials will be provided with that information.  I also can provide county EC’s with a list of members who have submitted training certificates.  This information can also be provided to ARES members wishing to verify the courses we have on record for them. 

    Now you can also help me by letting me know when you change your call.  I will update your information to reflect the change and keep our information current. I also have room to keep email addresses and phone numbers if you care to have them included.  When you do submit your course certificates, please also let us know if you are associating with an ARES group other than your county of residence.  Your data is however associated with county of residence with provision to show you are serving with another county. 

    As always, if you have any questions, your local county Emergency Coordinator is an excellent resource.  I will also be happy to answer any questions about the database for you.  Feel free to contact me at any time,w8erw@arrl.net.

    That’s all for this month.  Let me say Thank you again to all of you for your dedication to our ARES mission and diligence in completing these NIMS courses.  This is a seriously positive effort that is being noticed by everyone.  You are making Ohio shine.

    73,

    Jim W8ERW

    ****************************************************

    LET'S TALK
    Scott Yonally, N8SY - Section Manager

    Hey Gang,

    Have you seen that the NEWEST “Handbook Giveaway” drawing on the website? It’s there..!! To enter the drawing all you need to do is fill in a couple of boxes on the form.. (your name and email). That’s you need to do to be entered into a drawing to win a 2016 ARRL softcover Handbook. There’s nothing else required (Oh.. You do need to be a resident of Ohio to win..)   The winner will be mailed the Handbook at my cost. This is being offered just to see how many folks are really checking in on the website. Got the idea? Best of luck to you!!
    Now.. speaking of the website..  Have you looked at it within the past day or so? If not you’re in for a really big surprise!! It’s changed..  Yes my friends, I have freshened it up a bit and made it a little easier for you to maneuver around. There’s now drop-down menus so that you can easily pick what you want to view. As time goes along there will be more changes too.   You will find the Ohio Section Website at:http://arrl-ohio.org
    I hope you like the changes.. It does make it look much more professional for sure.

    Are you getting those emails from me? If not, all you have to do is to “Opt-In” to receive them. Heck, just send me an email   n8sy@n8sy.com   I’ll get you added to the mailing list. There’s a link to do this on the Ohio Section website, it’s on the bottom left corner. For your convenience. Here’s a direct link to it:  http://arrl-ohio.org/forwarder/forwarding.html  I urge all of you to make sure that everyone, regardless of whether they are a League member or not, gets signed up for one of these options. You can always “Opt-Out” at any time if you feel this is not what you were expecting. 

    On that same subject, there’s another NEW – one question – questionnaire on the Ohio Section Website! This question is really important for me to know. It will only take about 2 seconds for you to answer it, and you can see how your answer stacks up with others instantly. If you haven’t done it yet, please do. I really want to hear from you.

    Are you going to Dayton this year? Just wanted you to know that if you do look for the Ohio Section Booth within the ARRL Field Services Section in building 2. Yes, the Ohio Section will be there once again!! I wasn’t too hopeful at the end of last year when it looked like there just wouldn’t be enough space for us.. But, lo and behold they found room. So, I’ll have the NEW Ohio Section Banner on display and we’re going to celebrate too.. Since the Special Dayton Giveaway was such a huge success last year, we’re going to repeat it.. I have a number of ARRL Gift Certificates, Handbooks and a few other items that we will be giving away. All that you have to do is stop by our booth and sign up! That’s it.. The winners will be announce on Monday, May 22nd and the prizes will be shipped out then. I’m looking forward to seeing everyone and good luck to all of you!!

    Are you a member of the ARRL?? If you aren’t a League member, this is a great opportunity to become one. Want more information on how to join? Here’s the link:http://www.arrl.org/membership-levels. There’s even a 90 day FREE trial that you can apply for if you’ve never been a member.. Got questions about being a member or what the League is all about? Send me an email n8sy@n8sy.com   I’ll be happy to call or write to you. We can even meet and have coffee if you’d like, and I’ll buy!!

    I’m sure all of you have heard me say that I’m always available for you, whether you’re an ARRL member or not. It’s true, and you can feel free to write or call me anytime. If you have any questions, concerns, or would just like to sit and chat awhile over a cup of coffee or something cold to drink, feel free to call or write me    (419) 512-4445 or n8sy@n8sy.com   

    That’s going to do it for this month. I hope to see you all at your hamfests, club meetings or on the air!

    73, Scott, N8SY

    ****************************************************
    THE OFFICIAL OBSERVER COORDINATOR
    John Perone, W8RXX

    Totals for February:

    Good OO cards sent = 2
    OO cards sent = 1
    Total hours monitored by Ohio OO's = 1066


    73, John, W8RXX

    ****************************************************

    SPECIAL EVENTS STATIONS
    04/22/2017 | 5th Annual Earth Day Celebration
    Apr 22, 1400Z-2000Z, W8PRC, Parma, OH.

    Parma Radio Club. 14.245 7.195.
    QSL. W8PRC, 7811 Dogwood Lane,
    Cleveland, OH 44130.

    Contact us to celebrate Earth Day.
    We'll be operating solely on power from Ol' Sol.

    ****************************************************

    OHIO HAMFEST CALENDAR

     03/18/2017 | MOVARC HAMFEST
     Location: Gallipolis, OH
     Sponsor: MOVARC Club
     Website:
     https://sites.google.com/site/midohiovalleyarc/

     03/19/2017 | Toledo Mobile Radio Association
     Hamfest and Computer Fair
     Location: Perrysburg, OH
     Sponsor: Toledo Mobile Radio Association
     Website: 
    http://www.tmrahamradio.org

    04/01/2017 | Portsmouth Radio Club Hamfest
    Location: Portsmouth , OH
    Sponsor: Portsmouth Radio Club

    04/08/2017 | CFARC 63rd Annual Hamfest
    Location: Cuyahoga Falls, OH
    Sponsor: Cuyahoga Falls Amateur Radio Club

    04/29/2017 | Jackson County Amateur Radio Club Hamfest
    Location: Jackson, OH
    Sponsor: Jackson County Amateur Radio Club

    ****************************************************

    A final – final.. Today is March 15th.. It’s the Ides of March.. Be careful out there and don’t let any of your friends get to close to you today.. Hi.. hi.. 

    A little history if you please..  In 1971 Chatrooms make their debut on ARPANET, the forerunner of the Internet, and in 1985 the first Internet domain name, symbolics.com is registered.

    Now... Amateur Radio is exciting and a lot of FUN. It’s also a learning experience for everyone! Share your enjoyment and learning experiences with those just coming into Amateur Radio!! 


    eof..



  5. In this issue:

    -> SKYWARN TRAINING
    -> SEVERE WEATHER SYMPOSIUM
    -> THE TECHNICAL COORDINATOR
    -> AFFILIATED CLUB COORDINATOR REPORT
    -> NATIONAL PARKS ON THE AIR
    -> THE SECTION EMERGENCY COORDINATOR
    -> THE PUBLIC INFORMATION COORDINATOR
    -> THE SECTION TRAFFIC MANAGER
    -> OUT AND ABOUT
    -> FROM THE EDUCATIONAL OUTREACH ASM
    -> ARES TRAINING UPDATE
    -> LET'S TALK
    -> THE OFFICIAL OBSERVER COORDINATOR
    -> FIELD DAY
    -> SPECIAL EVENT STATIONS IN OHIO
    -> OHIO HAMFEST CALENDAR

    ****************************************************

    SKYWARN TRAINING – WHERE CAN I GET IT..

    Hey Gang, it’s time to start thinking of either renewing, or obtaining your Skywarn training for 2017. Do you know where the training is being made available?

    Here’s are links to all weather offices that cover Ohio. Depending on where you live will depend on which weather office you’ll want to look at. It’s your choice as to which area you want to go to, but just be sure to get that training in!






    You can also find these links on the Ohio Section ARES webpage under Skywarn too 

    ****************************************************
    SEVERE WEATHER SYMPOSIUM
    (from Michael Schulsinger, N8QHV)

    The Ohio State University MetClub is hosting the 21st Severe Weather Symposium.  The symposium is free, though there is a charge for parking at the Ohio Union on OSU's main campus. 

    The 2017 symposium is scheduled for Friday, March 24th.  Lunch is available in the Union, or at restaurants across High Street.

    I have attended most of these and only regretted one year - the year a tornado outbreak plowed across northern Kentucky, southern Indiana and southern Ohio during the conference!  The link to RSVP ishttp://u.osu.edu/metclub .

    Hope to see everyone there!

    ****************************************************

    THE TECHNICAL COORDINATOR
    Jeff Kopcak – TC

    Hey gang,

    On Sunday, February 12, I connected up with the Central Ohio Radio Club located in, you guessed it, central Ohio!  They have a Tech Net most Sunday evenings at 7:30pm.  They asked me to be the featured guest on one of their nets.  Some of you might realize this causes a problem since I live in the Cleveland area.  Enter the technical side of the hobby and IRLP.  IRLP (Internet Radio Linking Project) is a service that connects amateur stations together using Voice over Internet Protocol (VoIP).  Different from other ham radio VoIP services, IRLP requires the Internet link be connected to an RF link, usually a repeater or simplex node.  Using the LEARA 146.880 repeater in Cleveland (a club which I’m Vice President and a bunch of other stuff) and Internet linking technology, I was able to join their net as if I were local to Columbus.

    The CORC Tech Net contacted me looking for information on technical resources available in the section.  I got the chance to do an introduction about myself – we’ll quickly move past that ;)  Then I talked about how the technical resources fit into the ARRL organizational structure.  If you’re new or haven’t looked at it before, at the top are the ARRL Officers: president, first & second vice presidents, COO, etc.  The ARRL Board Committees include the Executive Committee, Administration & Finance, Programs & Services, Public Relations, DX, LoTW, etc.  Then Divisions, of which there are 15 total, with Director and Vice Director positions.  In Ohio, we’re included in the Great Lakes Division.  Finally, our section is the Ohio Section where Scott - N8SY is our fearless leader and Section Manager (SM).

    Below the SM are their appointees who may or may not include (depending on the section): Section Traffic Manager (STM), Section Emergency Coordinator (SEC), Assistant Section Manager (ASM), Official Observer Coordinator (OOC), Technical Coordinator (TC), Affiliated Club Coordinator (ACC), Public Information Coordinator (PIC), State Government Liaison (SGL), Section Youth Coordinator (SYC).  If you’re reading this, the people above and below me in this Journal make up this list.  I won’t spend too much time here as details can be found on the “About ARRL” page athttp://www.arrl.org/about-arrl.

    As the Technical Coordinator, I’m responsible for the Technical Specialists.  The Specialists and I are here to promote technical advances and experimentation in the hobby.  We encourage amateurs in the section to share their technical achievements with others in QST, at club meetings, in club newsletters, hamfests, and conventions.  We’re available to assist program committees in finding or providing suitable programs for local club meetings, ARRL hamfests, and conventions in the section.  When called upon, serve as advisors in RFI issues and work with ARRL officials and appointees for technical advice.

    The Technical Specialists really make all this happen.  In the Ohio Section, there are about 20 qualified and competent Specialists willing to help.  They meet the obligation of advancing the radio art bestowed to us by the FCC.  The TS’s support the Section in two main areas of responsibility: Radio Frequency Interference and technical information.  RFI can include harmful interference (interference that seriously degrades, obstructs, or repeatedly interrupts a radio communication service) from bad insulators on telephone poles to grow lights and poorly made transformers, RFI direction finding, or assist in locating bozo stations.  Technical information is everything else from building antennas, repeaters and controllers, digital, computers, networking, and embedded devices.

    How can we help?  The knowledge and abilities of your Technical Specialists are quite impressive.  Here are some examples of the knowledge the Technical Specialists provide:
      * Documentation and training.
      * VHF/UHF portable operation.
      * Antennas (fixed, portable, and mobile).
      * Batteries and emergency power.
      * Experts in RFI from powerline and consumer devices.
      * VHF/UHF/SHF contesting.
      * Experts in test equipment.
      * Automotive electronic compatibility (EMC) and interference (EMI).
      * Repeaters.
      * Digital modes (D-STAR, DMR, Fusion, P25, APRS & IGates.  HF: MT63, JT65, Olivia, PSK).
      * Computers and networking (VoIP – AllStar link, software engineering, embedded systems – Raspberry Pi, Arduino).
      * Society of Broadcast Engineers (SBE) members knowledgeable in interference problems.

    This impressive list of qualifications is available to all in the Ohio Section.  Looking for help in one of these areas?  Feel free to contact myself.  My contact info is near my picture and on thearrl-ohio.org website.  I’ll try to assist or get some more information from you and put you in touch with an appropriate Technical Specialist.  One of the Specialists might hear a plea for help and reach out to you as well.  If you would like to add your talents, check out the description at the ARRL site:http://www.arrl.org/technical-specialist and talk to Scott or myself.

    Thanks again to CORC (http://corc.us/) for inviting me as the featured guest on their Tech Net and LEARA (http://www.leara.org/) for the use of the IRLP node to make this connection possible.

    That’s about it for this month.  Stay tuned for next month’s article, got something good planned.  Thanks for reading and 73… de Jeff – K8JTK

    ****************************************************

    THE AFFILIATED CLUBS COORDINATOR
    John Myers, KD8MQ - ACC

    Hello everyone, here we are; another month closer to springtime. I’m itching to get started on outdoor projects. The winter wasn’t a friend to my tri-bander, so that is job one.

    I saw last week that the Entry Level License Committee at the league is looking at recommending either changes to the existing technician license, or a new, simpler license. I know this is a subject that raises strong opinions on either side of the discussion, so please, surf over to the league website and let your voice be heard, by filling out a short survey. You can find it athttp://www.arrl.org/license-1.

    Next, as I was reading the January issue of CQ Magazine, one article in particular caught my eye. The article, “Growing Ham Radio: Are We Placing Emphasis On the Wrong Objective?” by K8HSY is on pg. 42.
    Space prevents me from reprinting the article here, but the writer makes some excellent points. One is the importance of elmering to assist our new Hams in getting on the air, and enjoying Amateur Radio. He also points out that while we have lots of new licensees, not enough is being done to get them active, and on the air. If you have access the January issue of CQ, I recommend giving this article a look.

    On the same subject, here’s something that crossed my desk the other day. It’s from the January issue of the Monday Morning Memo.

    The editor, John, WA8KIW reported on several clubs who had held licensing classes recently. This resulted in many new Hams in the South Central Ohio area. Following up on that is John’s “sermon”. I’ll reprint it here.

    THE SERMON--Now the challenge is for us “old timers” to help them get on the air and active. Be an Elmer.  Give them advice and assistance finding equipment that meets their needs.  Even lend extra items for them to experience.  Don’t ignore them when you hear them on the air.  Give them a call and welcome them to the airwaves.  And if they make mistakes or use CB or public service terms, don’t go off on them.  Remember, you were once new yourself!  And for you “newbies”, even if you got the license and a radio only for emergency purposes, get on the air and learn how to use the radio and the proper procedures.  It serves no purpose for you to have gone through the effort to become licensed and then not use it.  You will have nothing more than an expensive paperweight if during an emergency you try to use an improperly programed radio or the batteries are dead.  Sermons Over!

    The Monday Morning Memo is a weekly newsletter, based out of Highland, Ohio. Its focus is not on any one club, but rather on Ham Radio in that region. The idea of a regional newsletter was so interesting that I copied the idea, and started something similar in NE Ohio. If you’d like to be added to the mailing list, you can contact John athighlandara@yahoo.com.

    As Scott, N8SY says, let’s switch gears. Tom Gallagher’s column in the March issue of QST (pg. 11) really caught my attention. It is entitled is “Get On The air With History”. He leads off with a story about stopping at the Minute Man National historic Park, and continues onto the story of the 95th anniversary of the first shortwave reception across the Atlantic.

    Obviously it isn’t real tough to figure out what these two events have to do with one another. His article reminded me of a cool club activity idea. That’s right, Special Event Stations. They are good for not only the groups who put them on, but they also help to raise awareness of the event. There’s a wealth of Special Event possibilities all around us. Just pick one and begin planning. You can register your operation on the league website atwww.arrl.org/special-events-application.

    So what events do we commemorate? Well, Here in Alliance, we do a special event each year commemorating the birthplace of the state flower; the Scarlet Carnation. We’ve also done events commemorating the birthplace of Taylorcraft Aviation.  When I think of Special Event Stations, The Cambridge ARA comes to mind. During their 100th Anniversary, they conducted a special event operation each month for a year.

    I know there’s a lot more of you out there conducting events, and to you I say good job!

    And that wraps it up for another month. See you next time.


    73 DE KD8MQ

    ***************************************************

    NATIONAL PARKS ON THE AIR
    John Myers, KD8MQ - ACC

    This is my final NPOTA column in the Section journal. It’s been a fun year finding new NPOTA stuff to write about. I hope you have enjoyed reading it. But, with NPOTA is finished, and there’s a lot more stuff out there to enjoy.

    The NPOTA website will be online for a few months yet, and you can order your chaser, activator Honor roll certificates for a while yet. The NPOTA Swag available via the ARRL Store is definitely on a “While supplies last” basis, so get your orders in today.

    NPOTA wrap-up article – The NPOTA wrap-up is online as a free article atwww.arrl.org/this-month-in-qst. It is also available in the March issue of QST.

    Also, it has been announced that the league has no plans to dismantle the NPOTA Facebook group. So, in the words of Norm, W3IZ, “Party On”!

    I’d like to congratulate Dennis, AI8P, and Eric, WD8RIF, for being the number 1 & 2 activators in Ohio. I know that they were running neck & neck right up to the end.

    In the chaser column, we have Doug, KD8F, and Doug (Sorry if I butchered your name) WB8TLI for winding up as number 1 & 2 in Ohio.

    And that is all I have this month. 


    73,
    John, KD8MQ

    ****************************************************

    THE SECTION EMERGENCY COORDINATOR
    Stan Broadway, N8BHL

    The 2017 ARES VHF Contest Results

    The 2017 ARES VHF Simplex contest had a runaway winner!  N8WAC, Tony Everhardt from Walbridge in Wood County, just south of Toledo, racked up an impressive score of 5,258 having worked 22 counties!  This may not be a surprise to Tony, since he is a dedicated VHF DX-er (with a nice antenna system to boot.)   As you might expect, ‘iron in the sky’ makes a big difference.

    But Tony wasn’t the only one with an impressive score. The next three top scorers- in Shelby, Hardin, and Medina- all placed over a thousand points on the board and two were also in double-digit county contacts.  Eight stations operated in the digital mode. Four were portable, five operated from an EOC.
    Call
    County
    Score
    Counties
    Total
    N8WAC
    Wood
    239
    22
    5258
    N8KZL
    Shelby
    174
    10
    1740
    W8VMV
    Hardin
    142
    8
    1136
    W8EOC
    Medina
    85
    13
    1105
    K8GDT
    Medina
    145
    5
    725
    KD8FHY
    Medina
    161
    3
    483
    N8MPF
    Cuyahoga
    55
    7
    385
    N8DCA
    Delaware
    74
    5
    370
    WO3X
    Summit
    58
    5
    290
    AC8UJ
    Hamilton
    95
    3
    285
    KC8PUW
    Coshocton
    67
    4
    268
    AA8BN
    Coshocton
    81
    3
    243
    W8VVL
    Hamilton
    106
    2
    212
    AD8Y
    Cuyahoga
    19
    5
    95
    N8BHL
    Delaware
    13
    5
    65
    AB8SV
    Coshocton
    31
    2
    62
    KC8ZQT
    Coshocton
    19
    1
    19
    KD8ZLD
    Hamilton
    18
    1
    18

    There were other stations operating, some making fairly good DX for 2 meters.  If I did not receive your score, I apologize… I had some email headaches during the period.

    Band conditions were interesting. From Delaware I listened to two Medina stations who would be solid for five minutes, then fade, then come right back. As the county numbers showed, those conditions applied across the state.  I hope you had fun with this event, and I hope it helped you map your coverage area and potential for application in a true emergency!

    And Now What?

    ARES in Ohio is not a one-man show. It’s not a ten-person show either. It belongs to you! We are no better than what each individual member contributes- and your contributions were immense last year! On Sunday January 29th, all DEC’s, our ASEC’s, OHDEN and W8SGT team members sat down to plan and discuss where we stand. I can’t thank them enough- a couple drove through ice and as much as 10” of snow, several had two plus hours of driving. Their dedication shows how much they value ARES. You have some great leadership there!

    A brief outline:
    Issue 1: Complacency.  Our members are busy people, and since we don’t have wildfires, hurricanes and the like, we aren’t exactly busy with fulfilling emergency activity. On the other hand, we may be too busy- bicycle rides, marathons and other activities can bring burnout and schedule conflict. Whatever the reasons, our task is to figure out how to battle complacency—because that is a major enemy to success when a major event actually rears its head. The answer is simple, “Do something!”   Another great idea, for DEC’s and EC’s especially: real personal contact (imagine that!)  The telephone can be used to keep people involved. So we’re working on “do something” and “do something different”.

    Issue 2: ARESMAT. This has not brought in ‘waves’ of volunteers, so Matt KD8TTE has re-structured the concept to provide positive results!  We intend to offer training and operator certification to assure that our state’s top operators can carry the “ARESMAT” credentials. It will be something worth working toward- and the results will produce a cadre of talented people we need.

    Issue 3: OHDEN.  We discussed at length some of the band conditions, mode bottlenecks and other aspects of this very important service.  The bigger concern is how to reduce the lengthy check-in times for the net and still be a viable statewide service. One concept Gary and Eldon are going to work on is that of a county station login.  Just so happens it’s in keeping with OSERP, but the thinking is that ONE station per county would log into the net, after taking logins from any other stations within their own county. We also discussed a rollcall type login rather than blanket calls. Another suggestion is that each district create a digital team, able to handle and distribute local traffic, and interact with OHDEN as the state level.  Gary and Eldon will soon have an operations manual ready for distribution.

    Issue 4: When the bands are no more.  Let’s face it- our HF bands stink. And they’ll get worse as the sunspot cycle continues toward bottoming out. Our state nets don’t even need to try 40, and 80 goes long before net time.  Out of state stations can hear everyone, and have helped relay, but that doesn’t give me a warm and fuzzy in case we need solid statewide comms. So what to do?  The answer- I don’t know yet.  We talked about 6 meters, but that presents a major question: SSB (horizontal antennas) or FM (vertical antennas but some infrastructure and repeaters exist.)  And is that even workable? We would have to relay and regionalize. The same could be said of two meters.  Another notion is that while higher HF bands are gone, 160 is becoming absolutely stunning- with solid copy throughout the state. So do we need to recommend you go out and buy 530’ of wire and an acre or two to hang it?  The jury is still out- and I welcome your suggestions!  In the meantime, we’re also considering digital voice modes and other possibilities including WinLink. We need some answers soon!

    ARES will be facing some challenges!  While all this goes on, we each must stay prepared, stay trained (those FEMA courses are important!), and keep in touch with each other and our agencies- because our services can be requested at any minute. 

    Stay ready, stay warm, stay equipped for the weather, and have some fun!

    For the latest Section Emergency Coordinator’s monthly report go to: http://arrl-ohio.org/SEC/notes.html


    73, Stan, N8BHL

    ****************************************************

    THE PUBLIC INFORMATION COORDINATOR
    John Ross, KD8IDJ

    College Amateur Radio Clubs “All Hams on Deck”

    Over the past couple of weeks I’ve talked to representatives of several college Amateur Radio clubs only find out that radio, at the university level, is not quite as popular as football, basketball, hockey and sometimes volleyball!!

    I guess it’s no surprise but it does make the latest effort by the ARRL to strengthen university radio clubs all that more important.

    There are two significant problems facing university Amateur Radio clubs…the first is graduation! It’s a pretty “good” problem to have though when students are actually going to college and graduating with a degree! While it takes a toll on membership turnover it speaks volumes to the dedication of the students and their determination to complete their degrees.

    The second problem that college radio clubs have is visibility…real and virtual. Most campus radio clubs “shacks” are located in remote areas out of the mainstream of campus life. After all, ham radio is not quite as attractive as a multi-million dollar sports complex. The virtual reality of the campus radio clubs lies with college of discipline that is supporting the club. Colleges of Engineering are usually the biggest sponsors but often the clubs fall under a college that is light years removed from anything remotely connected to Amateur Radio.

    As amateurs I think we can help on all levels by offering our expertise, our time and our knowledge to help bridge the gaps and keep the clubs running and visible. If you’re an alumni of a university that has, or had, a ham radio club…reach out…find other alumni or friends who can make a contribution. Offer to loan, find or work on equipment so the clubs are “air worthy” and their members can engage in hands-on experiences…not just talk. Invite club members to your club’s meetings so they can make new friends, share their interests and maybe latch on to some renewed inspiration. Write about the college radio clubs in your newsletters or let them write a column for your newsletter then make sure the campus student newspaper gets a copy!

    We need an “all hams on deck” approach to help Amateur Radio survive and grow at the college level. We also might need to make sure area high schools are not left out of the loop. Colleges can “recruit” high school hams so they don’t get lost in the transition to higher education.

    You’ll see my stories in a few weeks about the campus radio clubs. Share yours as well. Together we can use our collective power to amplify the status of Amateur Radio everywhere!!!!


    The 2017 Ohio Section Newsletter Contest

    Not counting what’s left of February…there are only 4 months left to submit your entry for the 2017 Ohio Section Newsletter Contest!!

    I know it sounds unbelievable but time goes fast! If you send me your newsletter every month you’re in and don’t have to worry. But it takes two newsletters to qualify so make sure you get them to me by June 30th.

    It takes the judges sometimes a couple of days to make their decisions and then the results are sealed in a locked repeater cavity until our meeting in early August!!!

    I’ve a got a ton of newsletters already so we’re off to a great start. Keep them coming.

    Here’s a link to the rules.. http://arrl-ohio.org/pic_page/pic.html


    One More Digital Format To Try

    Just about the time I’m getting used to programming my new DMR radio…I get an email from a friend telling me yet another digital mode…JT65-HF.

    Apparently I’m in the dark about this mode so I had to do some research…and maybe our Technical Coordinator can shoot me some info.

    JT65-HF is a low power digital mode invented by Joe Taylor K1JT. From what I’ve learned so far it’s usually done with 5 watts…although some hams has used as  much as 40 wants…but even when the signal is bad the message can be decoded.

    It never ceases to amaze me all of the different options Amateur Radio has to offer.

    That’s it for now….


    73,

    John, KD8IDJ

    ****************************************************

    THE SECTION TRAFFIC MANAGER
    David Maynard, WA3EZN - STM

    February news 2017
    When it comes to traffic handling there is the right way and the wrong way to do almost everything.  When it comes to news for the Ohio Section Journal almost everything has been published in the Journal about traffic handling or is currently on the Ohio Section websitewww.arrl-ohio.org.  So I will list the Ohio HF traffic nets and a few tips then move on to other things.

    Buckeye Net Early – CW – WB8YLO NET MANAGER – 3580 at 6:45 PM
    Buckeye Net Late – CW – WB9LBI NET MANAGER – 3590 at 10:00 PM
    Ohio Slow Net –         CW – W8OLO NET MANAGER – 3.53535 at 6 PM
    Ohio Single Sideband Net – Phone – KC8WH NET MANAGER –
         OSSBN Frequency and times - 3972.5 at 10:30 AM, 4:15 PM and 6:45 PM

    But first a few traffic handling tips:
    If using push-to-talk operation when transmitting a message, un-key the microphone often so the receiving station may break in if necessary.

    Remember to send your message slow enough for the receiving station to copy your message on paper. The number ZERO (0) is not the letter "O". It is pronounced as ZERO and not as OH or OWE. The letter "O" phonetically is OSCAR.

    Use pro-words to identify what is coming next in a message being transmitted:
    FIGURE or FIGURES identifies the next piece of information as a number or group of numbers. INITIAL (s) or LETTERS-GROUP identifies the next item as a single letter group or group of letters (e.g. an acronym such as ARES) spelled out using the Phonetic Alphabet.

    I SPELL identifies the next word as having a unique spelling or is a proper name, Kristine I SPELL, Kelo Romeo India Sierra Tango India November Echo, Kristine.

    Breaks in the text identified by the letter "X" are always sent as INITIAL X-RAY. The net control station's operating frequency is always the correct frequency for all members of the net, regardless if it is not the normal net frequency.  You should alway zero beat to the NCS frequency.

    The net control station will always direct the station receiving traffic to call the station sending the traffic.
    Enough said for now let’s move on to other things.  If you are going to participate during an emergency you need to be prepared and also have your family protected.  Here is where to get some help.

    The Ohio Emergency Management Agency website ishttp://ema.ohio.gov/index.aspx.
    There is so much useful information on this website about safety and preparedness that it is impossible to list it all here.  I suggest you use the link and see for yourself.  Also on the website is this announcement:

    Notice of Funding Opportunity

    Ohio Emergency Management Agency (Ohio EMA)

    Security Grants for Nonprofits (H.B. No. 384)

    Period of Performance: April 19, 2017 -- June 30, 2018

    The Ohio EMA Security Grants for Nonprofits program provides funding to nonprofit organizations for eligible security improvements that assist the organization in preventing, preparing for, and responding to acts of terrorism. Deadline for submission: March 15, 2017. Additional details can be found at :

    Moving on to this website:https://www.nasa.gov/
    This is another interesting website for the National Aeronautics and Space Administration NASA.  NASA is the only federal agency responsible for its people’s safety and well-being here on Earth and in space and has a longtime commitment to safety and emergency preparedness. In 2011 NASA Administrator Charles F. Bolden, sent an email to all NASA employees encouraging them to prepare themselves for potential emergencies such as fires, floods, earthquakes, hurricanes, tornadoes, terrorist attacks and other unforeseen catastrophes.

    This website is worth checking out.  There are many photos available plus information about some of the tests done in space. 

    Moving on to this website:http://www.redcross.org
    This is one of our served agencies where 90% of the Red Cross workforce are volunteers. In February  2017 the American Red Cross responded to disasters across the entire country including the tornado damage in southern Louisiana and flooding out west. More than 360 Red Cross disaster staff and volunteers are deployed to multiple response scenes, helping people impacted by these emergency situations. 

    Meanwhile many areas in the Northeast were hit with heavy snowfall, and were experiencing potential blizzard conditions and power outages. Winter storm warnings have been posted by the National Weather Service for all of southern New England, eastern Pennsylvania, New Jersey, and parts of Delaware and Maryland. Boston, Providence, Hartford, New York City and Philadelphia are also included. 

    The Red Cross provides safety and survival information on its website.  Check it out.
    The Official website of the Department of Homeland Security is:https://www.ready.gov/
    The Department of Homeland Security offers a free 2017 National Seasonal Preparedness Messaging Calendar and the key messages provides you with content to promote preparedness all year. Stay safe by learning how to be prepared for floods, fires, tornadoes and other extreme emergencies.

    The Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) has made files for the Ready Campaign's publications available to the public to download at no cost. As a result, organizations can reproduce these materials to help expand the reach with this critical information.  You can find these publications athttps://www.fema.gov/.
    The Emergency Management Institute (EMI) offers self-paced courses designed for people who have emergency management responsibilities and the general public. All are offered free-of-charge to those who qualify for enrollment. To get a complete listing of courses, click on Course List link above.

    Independent Study Exams now require a FEMA Student Identification (SID) Number. If you do not yet have a SID, register for one today:https://cdp.dhs.gov/femasid.

    FEMA courses is100.b, is200.b, is700.a and is800.b are required for involvement in any emergency event.  If you have not yet completed these free online course I urge you to do so soon.  Use this link to find the courses under Independent Study at this website:https://training.fema.gov/is/crslist.aspx

    As Scott N8SY says every Ohio ARES member needs to have at least these 4 basic courses completed. Why are these courses so important? The simple answer is this - we need these courses as part of our requirement for our state credentialing system. As you know, the State of Ohio has a credentialing system that we are a big part of, and to obtain your credential when the time is needed, means that you need to have these courses completed and turned in to the database. So, without these courses being completed, you won’t be able to get credentialed!

    Along the same lines is the upcoming Skywarn Weather Spotter Training sessions.  If you are not yet certified as a trained weather spotter or you need a renewal course you can find information and registration information athttp://skywarn.org/local-skywarn-groups/ohio/.

    That's it for now.

    For the latest Section Traffic Monthly Report go to:  http://arrl-ohio.org/stm/stm.html

    73
    David WA3EZN
    Ohio Section Traffic Manager

    ****************************************************

    OUT AND ABOUT
    Lyn Alfman, N8IMW - Assistant Section Manager

    I attended the Sunday Creek Amateur Radio Federation Hamfest in Nelsonville on January 15. 

    Sonny and I went on a cruise, so we were out of state between January 21 and January 28.  Therefore, we were too tired to go to the TUSCO Hamfest the next morning. 

    While we were gone, the Cambridge Amateur Radio Association (CARA) held nominations for 2017 officers at its January 28 meeting.  The election of officers will take place at the February meeting.

    Don’t forget Mansfield’s Mid-Winter Hamfest in February 19.

    Remember to be “Radio Active”!


    ’73 Lyn, N8IMW  

    ****************************************************

    FROM THE EDUCATIONAL OUTREACH ASM
    Anthony Luscre, K8ZT
     
    The ARRL has announced its 2017 Teachers Institute on Wireless Technology schedule. This summer's sessions will be held July 17-21 in Dayton, Ohio, and July 24-28 at ARRL Headquarters in Connecticut.

    The deadline to apply is May 1.

    These expenses-paid, intensive professional development opportunities offer educators training and resources to explore wireless technology in the classroom using Amateur Radio.

    Topics covered in the TI-1 Introduction to Wireless Technology include basic electronics, radio science, microcontroller programming, and basic robotics.

    Educators in the TI-1 class will also learn about Amateur Radio, take part in a hidden transmitter hunt, and see demonstrations of Amateur Radio satellite communication. Students will build and program their own simple robots. An Amateur Radio license is not required to take the TI-1 class. 
    For more information, please visit- www.arrl.org/ti   or have them contact me atk8zt@arrl.net

    73, Anthony, K8ZT

    ****************************************************

    ARES TRAINING UPDATE
    Jim Yoder, W8ERW/5

    ARES Training Update
    Ohio ARES members and participants are off to a fast start this year with FEMA training courses.  For the last three months, the training submissions have been rolling in at a surprising pace and for 2017, the numbers continue to impress.  It’s is still early in February, however, here they are as of February 14, 2017:  ARES Members Reporting Training – 628, ARES Members Completing the four FEMA Core Courses – 413 and Ohio Amateurs supporting ARES have taken 4,107 total courses.  Yes, quite impressive.  Thank you all.

    You might very well be thinking that all of this push towards the FEMA training is beginning to sound like a broken record.  We certainly do speak of it often with reminders etc.  However, it is important.  More and more, our served agencies are and will be insisting that when we work alongside them as Amateurs, this FEMA training will be essential and required.  Of course, our service to the communities and agencies that desire our help as communicators is voluntary.  However, one of our strengths as Amateurs and certainly one of the important elements of our ability to justify the amount of bandwidth that we have for our use is indeed focused our capability to communicate in a disaster situation.  We can get it done “When All Else Fails”.  I do not suppose that any of us especially likes change, even when it might be for the better.  As we evolve however, change is forever a part of most everything that we do including our Amateur Radio Hobby.  The emphasis being placed on FEMA training is one of those changes.   

    The best part of the FEMA training is that it is free and very relevant to what we do as ARES volunteers.  It is significant to our mission as it clearly defines the way our response will be structured and what individual responsibilities will be.  I think we all would agree that knowing the game plan before the game starts is a good thing if not absolutely essential to success.  FEMA training clearly defines how it will all be done and the organizational structure that we will be working within.  ICS or Incident Command System is a well-defined process with flexibility to meet the needs of all of us who will be an integral part of emergency response and preparedness.

    By now, many of you have taken and reported your FEMA training.  I suspect there are many more that have taken the training and have not yet reported it.  I encourage you to do both.  When you do so, you add strength to our position when we ask that our frequencies and bandwidth be preserved.  Now we have real numbers to backup our public service commitment.  When ARRL advocates on our behalf, they will have a positive and verifiable position to speak from.  We won’t need to defend our capabilities as Amateurs when we have clear numbers that demonstrate our commitment by the training we have undertaken to support our ARES activities. 

    I would like also to encourage you to ask those questions if you have them.  Your Emergency Coordinator is an excellent resource as are the Ohio ARRL Section Staff.  These folks are in regular contact with the organizations that we support and with ARRL in Newington.  More importantly, they are here to serve you and be available for your questions and concerns. This is true of questions concerning FEMA training or any other Amateur related activity.

    SM Scott Yonally N8SY is also posting regularly on the ARRLOHIO.org website, a list of those who have completed the four FEMA core courses that are required.  You can access the website and determine right away if we have your courses recorded for completion of this training.  You may also contact me if you have questions regarding the training documentation process.  Especially for EC’s, I can provide a list of your ARES members who have submitted training including a list of the training I have on record for them. 

    Training Certificates should be sent to your local EC and then to SM Scott Yonally N8SY.  The ideal format is a copy of the certificate in .pdf as these take up less space to store and are easier to manipulate when they are upside down or sideways.  Here is what the file should look like:  W8ERW-IS-00100.b.pdf.  This identifies you and the specific course number which makes looking you up at a later date much more simple.  Alternatively, a transcript from FEMA is acceptable especially if you have a lot of training to report.  You can obtain a transcript from the FEMA website and it will list all of your training with the necessary dates etc. to document the courses that you have taken.  Some of you may not have the ability to present a .pdf. Alternatively, a .jpg image can be used.  Some of you have taken the ARRL EC series courses as well as others related to your work as emergency responders etc.  These courses can also be reported.  

    Please let me know if you have any questions.  Most importantly, I want to thank all of you who have taken the FEMA training and taken the time to report it so that we will have a record of it.  In doing so, you insure that we will be available to serve as communicators when we are called to do so.  You are also adding strength to our position when the league defends our use of vital spectrum. Thanks for your efforts.


    Thanks and 73,


    Jim W8ERW

    ****************************************************

    LET'S TALK
    Scott Yonally, N8SY - Section Manager

    Hey Gang,
     
    Have you seen that the NEWEST “Handbook Giveaway” drawing on the website? It’s there..!! To enter the drawing all you need to do is fill in a couple of boxes on the form.. (your name and email). That’s you need to do to be entered into a drawing to win a 2016 ARRL softcover Handbook. There’s nothing else required (Oh.. You do need to be a resident of Ohio to win..)   The winner will be mailed the Handbook at my cost. This is being offered just to see how many folks are really checking in on the website. Got the idea? Best of luck to you!!

    Are you getting those emails from me? If not, all you have to do is to “Opt-In” to receive them. Heck, just send me an email   n8sy@n8sy.com   I’ll get you added to the mailing list. There’s a link to do this on the Ohio Section website, it’s on the bottom left corner. For your convenience. Here’s a direct link to it:
    http://arrl-ohio.org/forwarder/forwarding.html  I urge all of you to make sure that everyone, regardless of whether they are a League member or not, gets signed up for one of these options. You can always “Opt-Out” at any time if you feel this is not what you were expecting. 

    Let’s talk about the Ohio Section website. You can find the Ohio Section Website at:http://arrl-ohio.org  If you don’t have this website set as your home page, I urge you to do so. It changes a lot and it’s so important for you to be kept up to date with the very latest information.

    On that same subject, there’s another NEW – one question – questionnaire on the Ohio Section Website! This question is really important for me to know. It will only take about 2 seconds for you to answer it, and you can see how your answer stacks up with others instantly. If you haven’t done it yet, please do. I really want to hear from you.

    Are you a member of the ARRL?? If you aren’t a League member, this is a great opportunity to become one. Want more information on how to join? Here’s the link:http://www.arrl.org/membership-levels. There’s even a 90 day FREE trial that you can apply for if you’ve never been a member.. Got questions about being a member or what the League is all about? Send me an email n8sy@n8sy.com   I’ll be happy to call or write to you. We can even meet and have coffee if you’d like, and I’ll buy!!

    I’m sure all of you have heard me say that I’m always available for you, whether you’re an ARRL member or not. It’s true, and you can feel free to write or call me anytime. If you have any questions, concerns, or would just like to sit and chat awhile over a cup of coffee or something cold to drink, feel free to call or write me
    (419) 512-4445 or n8sy@n8sy.com  

    That’s going to do it for this month. I hope to see you all at your hamfests, club meetings or on the air!

    73, Scott, N8SY

    ****************************************************

    THE OFFICIAL OBSERVER COORDINATOR
    John Perone, W8RXX

    The Official Observer (OO) program has been sponsored by the ARRL for more than 85 years to help Amateur Radio operators assist each other to operate their stations in compliance with Federal Communications Commission (FCC) regulations.

    The object of the OO program is to notify amateurs of operating and technical irregularities before they come to the attention of the FCC and to recognize good operating practices.

    The OO performs his/her function by observing rather than transmitting.  They keep watch for such things as frequency instability, harmonics, hum, key clicks, broad signals, distorted audio, over deviation, out-of-band operation and other potential problems. The OO completes his/her task once the notification card is sent.

    In January 2017 the Ohio OO's monitored a total of 867 hours, sent out 3 Good operator cards, and 2 OO cards for issues they observed.


    73, John, W8RXX

    ****************************************************

    Field Day – It’s Not To Early To Start Planning

    Yes, I know it seems very early to talk about Field Day since it’s still 4 months away, but a lot of clubs are already starting to talk about, and getting their ideas down on paper as to just how they are going to attack this event this year.  I know of one club that has been in the planning stages since early October!

    As you know Field Day is always held on the 4th weekend of June. This year it will be on June 24 – 25.

    The ARRL has already gotten the Field Day packets prepared.. You can find them at:http://www.arrl.org/files/file/Field-Day/2017/2017%20Field%20Day%20Packet(1)(1).pdf

    For many years now the ARRL has provided a Field Day Locator for those sites submitting their location to the ARRL.. You can find the Locator at: http://www.arrl.org/field-day-locator  and YES, there are already several locations listed on the map for Ohio already!

    Bob Winston, W2THU and I will be moving forward to get a State of Ohio Proclamation signed by the governor for this very special weekend in just a short time from now. I will post it on the website when I do get it for re-printing, so that you can proudly display it at your Field Day site.

    Good Luck to everyone.. I am planning on doing my traditional trips around the Field Day sites, taking in as many of them as I can in that 24 hour period. I hope to visit with you on that weekend!!

    ****************************************************

    SPECIAL EVENTS STATIONS IN OHIO

    02/18/2017 | WRARC 7th Anniversary
    Feb 18, 1500Z-2300Z,
    W8WRC, New Springfield, OH.
    Western Reserve Amateur Radio Club.
    21.300 14.305 7.200.
    QSL. Western Reserve Amateur Radio Club,
    2050 East South Range Road,
    New Springfield, OH 44443.

    ****************************************************

    OHIO HAMFEST CALENDAR

    02/19/2017 | Mansfield Mid Winter Hamfest
    Location: Mansfield, OH
    Sponsor: Intercity Amateur Radio Club

    03/05/2017 | WinterHamFest
    Location: Elyria, OH
    Sponsor: Northern Ohio Amateur Radio Society
     *Free pancake breakfast with paid admission
     *Free Vibroplex Clinic
     Website: 
    http://noars.net

     03/18/2017 | MOVARC HAMFEST
     Location: Gallipolis, OH
     Sponsor: MOVARC Club
     Website:
     https://sites.google.com/site/midohiovalleyarc/

     03/19/2017 | Toledo Mobile Radio Association
     Hamfest and Computer Fair
     Location: Perrysburg, OH
     Sponsor: Toledo Mobile Radio Association
     Website: 
    http://www.tmrahamradio.org

    ****************************************************

    A final – final.. Hey Everyone, Amateur Radio is a lot of FUN.. and it’s a learning experience for everyone! Share your enjoyment and learning experiences with those just coming into Amateur Radio!! 


    eof..




  6. In this issue:

    -> SAFE ROOMS – REBATE PROGRAM UNDERWAY
    -> WINTER RESOURCES AVAILABLE
    -> WINTER SEASONAL OUTLOOK
    -> SKYWARN TRAINING
    -> THE TECHNICAL COORDINATOR
    -> AFFILIATED CLUB COORDINATOR REPORT
    -> NATIONAL PARKS ON THE AIR
    -> THE SECTION EMERGENCY COORDINATOR
    -> THE PUBLIC INFORMATION COORDINATOR
    -> THE SECTION TRAFFIC MANAGER
    -> OUT AND ABOUT
    -> ARES TRAINING UPDATE
    -> LET'S TALK
    -> THE OFFICIAL OBSERVER COORDINATOR
    -> WEBSITE STATS
    -> SPECIAL EVENT STATIONS IN OHIO
    -> OHIO HAMFEST CALENDAR

    ****************************************************

    SAFE ROOMS – REBATE PROGRAM UNDERWAY
    (info provided by: Donn Rooks -drooks@columbus.rr.com)

    Ohio EMA to Begin Accepting Safe Room Applications
     
    The Ohio Safe Room Rebate Program is once again accepting applications, beginning January 9. The program provides a rebate for the purchase and construction/installation of tornado safe rooms for Ohio homeowners.

    “The entire state of Ohio is at risk of an EF5 tornado, which produces 250 mile per hour winds capable of destroying most structures,” said Steve Ferryman, Ohio EMA mitigation branch chief. “A safe room is built to withstand these winds and resulting airborne debris and provides near absolute protection for occupants.”

    A safe room is an extreme-wind shelter or space that provides protection to people during a tornado. It can be constructed/installed in one of several places in the home: in the basement, beneath a concrete slab-on-grade foundation or garage floor, or in an interior room on the first floor. A safe room may also be buried in the yard or be a stand-alone structure near your home.

    Residents selected for the program are eligible for a rebate up to 75 percent of the cost to install or construct a safe room – up to a maximum of $4,875. To apply for the Ohio Safe Room Rebate Program, homeowners have until 5 p.m. March 10, to register on the Ohio EMA website:https://ohiosharpp.ema.state.oh.us/SafeRoom2017/, beginning January 9.

    The Ohio Safe Room Rebate Program will use a computerized random selection process to select applicants. A priority list of applicants will be created from the selected applicants. Chosen homeowners will be notified by e-mail of their position on the priority list on or after March 13. Ohio EMA anticipates grant funding will become available this year and having a list of participants who meet program requirements will expedite the rebate process.

    Funding for the rebate program is through a partnership with the Federal Emergency Management Agency’s (FEMA) Hazard Mitigation Assistance (HMA) grant programs. Ohio homeowners would be responsible for 25 percent of the construction costs and any additional costs over the 75 percent maximum rebate of $4,875.

    Safe rooms must meet FEMA requirements in FEMA publications 320 and 361, and cannot be constructed/installed prior to the rebate drawing and notification from Ohio EMA to proceed with construction. Ohio EMA plans to offer this rebate program on an annual basis. When and if HMA funding becomes available, the amount of funding will determine the number of rebates.

    ****************************************************

    WINTER RESOURCES AVAILABLE
    (info provided by: Don Wadew8dea1@juno.com)

    With winter upon us, it is always a good idea to remain prepared in the event of a winter storm or extreme cold.DisasterAssistance.gov has a number of helpful resources available for the general public and disaster survivors facing winter weather. DAIP has partnered with other government agencies to provide information to keep you safe. Great information is available on DisasterAssistance.gov under Disaster Information. The page contains comprehensive resources from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), National Weather Service, FEMA’sREADY.gov, the Environmental Protection Agency and the American Red Cross with links to important information about the threat of winter weather and cold.

    For example, the CDC’s Winter Weather page provides online resources to help you learn how to deal with the extreme cold and its health hazards. You can also get winter weather checklists and learn how to prepare your home and car for winter emergencies.

    Ready.gov provides additional information about winter storms and extreme cold. On their site you can take the Pledge to Prepare, learn what to do before, during and after a storm and get important facts on carbon monoxide. DAIP is committed to keeping the most up to date information about winter weather available onDisasterAssistance.gov so check these websites out often.

    ****************************************************

    WINTER SEASONAL OUTLOOK

    Hey Gang.. Want to know what this January will bring as far as our weather outlook?  I’ve got the predictions posted on the website..  It’s really fascinating just to see how these predictions stack up so far.


    ****************************************************

    SKYWARN TRAINING – WHERE CAN I GET IT..
     
    Hey Gang, it’s time to start thinking of either renewing, or obtaining your Skywarn training for 2017. Do you know where the training is being made available?

    Here’s are links to all weather offices that cover Ohio. Depending on where you live will depend on which weather office you’ll want to look at. It’s your choice as to which area you want to go to, but just be sure to get that training in!






    You can also find these links on the Ohio Section ARES webpage under Skywarn too 

    ****************************************************

    THE TECHNICAL COORDINATOR
    Jeff Kopcak – TC

    Hey gang,

    In early January I did some traveling.  Both intrastate and interstate.  Of course, I took my radios to play around and see what activity there was.  The first trip was to western Ohio and the second to south-western Pennsylvania (Johnstown area).  I have been a buff for keeping updated lists of repeaters between my usual travel spots.  Places I don’t frequent, I’ve relied on Internet sites.

    I’m always screwing around with programming in my radios and I have programming software for each.  When traveling, I program repeaters along the way and near where I’m staying.  My programming application of choice is the RT Systems programmer (https://www.rtsystemsinc.com/).  Their solution is about $50 for an entire package including the cable ($25) and programming software ($25).  However, 4 of my radios use the same cable so I only needed to purchase the cable once and the software for each radio.  CHIRP (http://chirp.danplanet.com/) is another popular solution for only the cost of a programming cable (~$15 each), the software is free.  CHIRP doesn’t manage radio settings like RT.  I like this ability because I tend to have different profiles depending how I’m using the radio.  Manufactures release their own software too.  Some are free downloads, others a premium accessory.  I gave up on these solutions because the couple I tried were horrible experiences and very barebones packages.  They were janky to operate and didn’t have an, what I consider to be essential, import/export function.

    RT Systems has a good importer where, in many cases, the output of a webpage can be copied and pasted into the programmer.  It will attempt to determine the content of each column (transmit frequency, PL, etc.).  It’s not always successful but the data type can be specified during the import process though, this needs to be repeated each time.  If a CSV file (plain text file with comma separated values) is not available, I found it much easier to paste webpage results into an Excel spreadsheet.  This will retain the data columns.  Insert a blank row above the data and type in labels that match the column headers in the programmer.  Other columns, like city or distance, can be deleted or left blank – and will be ignored.  Copy all data including headers and repeaters from the Excel sheet and paste them into the RT programmer.  The import wizard will appear.  Check that the data is being detected correctly in each step.  Clicking finish will complete importing the data into the programmer.  This helps greatly in importing data straight from a webpage so I don’t have to assign data types each time I import data.  This spreadsheet approach is not needed when using “External Data” sources built into the programmer.  Here are some header conversion examples: the webpage column label is on the left and the spreadsheet (RT) header on the right:

       * Frequency -> Receive Frequency
       * PL -> CTCSS
       * Call -> Name
       * Notes -> Comment
       * Distance -> *delete column or no label*
       * City -> *delete column or no label*

    Aside from the programming software, sources are needed for data.  I’ll share my experiences with some that I’ve used.  I used the Repeater Directory, Ohio Area Repeater Council (OARC) website, RFinder, K1IW Amateur Repeater and Broadcast Transmitters Database Websearch, RepeaterBook, Radio Reference, and the ArtSciPub Repeater database.

    General comments about these sources: much of the information is old, dated, stale, or wrong based on information I knew about repeaters in my home area and observations about the resulting data in my travels.  Most make some claim to pull data from a ‘number of sources,’ which almost always means the local repeater coordinating body for that area.  In Ohio, that is the Ohio Area Repeater Council.  Others take a crowdsourcing approach which enlists the services of a large number of people – or at least those who do contribute.

    Contributors can submit add/delete requests for repeaters as necessary, update call signs, PL tones, locations, features, network affiliations, Internet links, DMR Talk Groups, and so on.  It appears the Repeater Directory is used as a starting point for most databases.

    ARRL Repeater Directory and the Ohio Repeater Council website (http://www.oarc.com/): The Repeater Directory and OARC Repeater search are supposed to be one-in-the-same so that’s why I grouped these two together.  The OARC is the source for the printed ARRL Repeater Directory.  Recent updates may appear on the website with those changes appearing in the print edition a year or more later.  I did find differences between the printed edition and online version.  I’m unsure why but they should bethe same.  In both the printed and online searches, there are a lot of, what hams refer to as, “paper repeaters.”  That is someone who correctly holds a repeater frequency pair coordination but does not have a repeater in operation on that pair.  Repeaters in the testing phase or down for repairs are not considered paper repeaters, unless that time reaches 6 months of inactivity.  This timeframe is determined by the local repeater frequency coordinator.  Something else I noticed: there are repeater pairs turned over to the OARC, nearly a decade ago, that are still listed as active or coordinated.  The OARC website is free to use and results can be copied and pasted from the webpage for importing.  No export of the OARC database is available.

    The Repeater Directory comes in pocket sized ($10.95 -https://www.arrl.org/shop/The-ARRL-Repeater-Directory-Pocket-size) and desktop editions ($15.95 -https://www.arrl.org/shop/The-ARRL-Repeater-Directory-Desktop-Edition).  An electronic version is available through RFinder (see below).  Importing from the paper Repeater Directory into programming software is, well, impossible without typing it in or utilizing character recognition.J

    RFinder (https://www.arrl.org/shop/RFinder-The-World-Wide-Repeater-Directory/): Also known as the World Wide Repeater Directory (WWRD).  It started out as a project by Bob - W2CYK as the place to find repeater data.  He has partnered with the ARRL, RAC, RSGB, and many other organizations throughout the world including software companies for the ability to import directly from the RFinder database.  In partnering with the ARRL, RFinder is the online version of the printed Repeater Directory.  There is an iOS and Android app available.  The Android app is feature-rich which includes the ability to preload a continent (if you don’t or won’t have Internet access), different sort methods (frequency, distance), display estimated coverage maps, list Internet Linked nodes (EchoLink, IRLP, and AllStar), and ability to submit updates (crowdsourcing).  In addition to the mobile apps, much of the functionality is available through a web interface.  My favorite feature is the map displaying my current position and tower icons indicating repeaters nearby.  Though not the best implementation because a city with multiple coordinated repeaters has the icons for each stacked on top of each other.  A popup balloon listing all would have been more useful.  A lot of work has been put into developing features but, the interfaces could use some fine tuning as the map was one example of multiple problems I encountered.  RFinder suffers from paper repeater and stale data problems due to the source of the data.  An annual subscription of $9.99/year is required with multi-year and lifetime discounts available.  The Android app comes with a 30-day limited trial.  Purchasing the iOS version includes a 1 year subscription.

    K1IW Amateur Repeater and Broadcast Transmitters Database Websearch (http://www.amateur-radio.net/rptr/):  This website serves a single purpose: find repeaters and/or broadcast transmitters (FCC listed AM, FM, and TV) within an area.  Enter a city, state, radius, and select at least one band and the results will be a listing of repeaters within that radius – including Canada and DC.  The search aggregates various coordinating organizations along with a couple other sources.  Searching Toledo, Ohio brings up both Ohio and Michigan results.  Usefulness of the results are based on accuracy of the sources.  There are paper repeaters and stale data here as well.  Resulting lists can be copied and pasted from the webpage for importing.  This service is free.

    RepeaterBook(https://www.repeaterbook.com/): RepeaterBook relies on crowdsourced data and not sources like the Repeater Directory.  Upon navigating to a particular state, there is an extensive list of quick search options including: band, features (Autopatch, EchoLink, IRLP, linked), emergency service (ARES, RACES, Skywarn), coverage of a route (highway, US route, state route), town, county, and ratings.  Advanced search options provide radius, nationwide, travel, niche (digital modes, linking), and frequency vacancies.  Results can be copied and pasted from the webpage for importing.  Creating an account will enable exporting to the software applications CHIRP, G4HFQ, RT Systems, and TravelPlus.  Though most are CSV files, they nicely include the correct column headers and break the data into the correct fields like 146.610- into “Receive Frequency” and “Offset Direction.”  Since the data is crowdsourced, the listings are not entirely accurate.  I noticed a good number of repeaters in the Repeater Directory and on-the-air but, missing from RepeaterBook.  When I brought up the Pennsylvania Turnpike (I-76) for the jog around Pittsburgh, no repeaters were listed.  The first one returned was nearly 3 hours east of the PA border.  This means no repeaters in Pittsburgh have been submitted as covering I-76 which was incorrect seeing as I could hit a number of repeaters.  The website can use some unification because different options are available on different screens.  Mobile applications are available for iOS and Android and they support BlueCAT BlueTooth (http://www.zbm2.com/BlueCAT/) available for a limited number of radios.  Clicking a repeater listing in the mobile app will tune the radio to that frequency and set correct offsets and PL tones.  This service is free.

    Radio Reference(http://www.radioreference.com/):  Radio Reference is geared toward the scanner listener and contains mostly crowd sourced data for public service frequencies.  Scanner listeners who are travelers have definitely used this site.  Once you locate an area in the Frequency Database, often there will be a list of repeaters in the “Amateur Radio” tab.  This list is minimal and not comprehensive but includes mostly popular, emcomm, and Skywarn repeaters.  These will likely be ones of interest and will actually be on the air when you key up.  Results can be copied and pasted from the webpage for importing.  Downloading a CSV file requires a premium subscription of $15 for 180 days, $30 for 360, or by providing an audio scanner feed.

    ArtSciPub (http://www.artscipub.com/repeaters/): ArtSciPub stands for Arts & Sciences Publications.  They started as a software company and now do science related publications.  One of their projects is a repeater database.  Start a search by selecting a state, entering a zip code, or frequency.  The resulting list can be resorted by clicking any of the column headers.  Repeaters can be added or modified without an account.  This database is very old as changes that happened 15 years ago are still not listed.  Results can be copied and pasted from the webpage for importing.  A Repeater MapBook is available for purchase.  A membership of $20/year will allow access to larger maps, customized content, removal of advertisements, and high-quality PDF maps.

    In this realm, there are currently no great solutions with perfectly accurate data.  Some repeaters never change, others are changing all the time - which is a reason why it’s hard to keep accurate records of such as large population of repeaters.  I think my best option is using RepeaterBook in conjunction with the ARRL Repeater Directory or K1IW to get a good representation of the repeater landscape while traveling.

    I got the chance to finish up the project of getting LEARA’s Fusion repeater on the air New Year’s Eve.  I mentioned the first in a series of tips back in November.  With the help of Bill - K8SGX (Technical Specialist), we punched some holes, ran some jumper cables, and finally, the machine was on the air!  Other DR-1X owners who are using the repeater in Automatic Mode Select were reporting the repeater locking in transmit when a digital and analog signal were simultaneously received by the repeater.  Cycling the power would be required each time the repeater locked up.  Our club decided to configure the Fusion repeater in digital only mode as a result.  Today, it is a stand-alone repeater but things are looking promising for an Internet link.  If you’re in the Cleveland area, try out the 444.700 YSF repeater on the west side.  No tone, digital squelch, or digital code options are required.  Thanks again to K8SGX and my dad Tom – N8ETP for their help with this project.
    Thanks for reading and 73… de Jeff – K8JTK


    73… de Jeff – K8JTK

    ****************************************************

    THE AFFILIATED CLUBS COORDINATOR
    John Myers, KD8MQ - ACC
     
    Hi everyone,
    Well, we made it through 2016. We’ve had a mixed bag of weather this week, with freezing rain, snow, & flooding. It’s definitely been a good week to stay indoors. In this month column, I’m going to re-run the New Club Officers To-Do list. This originally ran last January, but I’ve updated it a bit.

    But first, let’s welcome our Newest Special service Club; the West Central Ohio Amateur Radio Association. This brings us to 28 Special Service Clubs in the state with more on the way. Congratulations!

    I'd like to again offer congratulations and a hearty thank you to all club officers, and trustees. I know that this can at times seem like a thankless job. But, it can also be a very rewarding one! 

    So, on we go to the club officers To-Do List. Not all of these suggestions will apply to you, or your club. But, I've tried to put together as many items as I can think of. Feel free to contact me with any additions, or corrections.

    * Meeting room reservations - Believe it or not, sometimes this very important task falls between the cracks. At my home club, we make a formal request each November to the Hospital which hosts our meetings. We take care of the entire upcoming year at that time.

    * Pavilions, Field Day sites, etc. – My club does a Special Event Club each August. So, in January, we reserve our park pavilion. Same goes for any other sites that may be needed during the upcoming year. Our local park department begins taking reservations at the beginning of January, and it is first come – first served.
     
    * Update your club record at arrl.org - I can't stress enough the importance of this one. This can be done from ARRL.org. Just click on “edit” at the upper right hand corner of your club record page.

    *Check the expiration date on your clubs SSC Status - The best way to check this is still to contact Scott, N8SY, or myself. Either of us will be happy to look it up for you.

    *Legal Stuff -If your club is registered with Ohio secretary of state, you can check your status here. - http://www.sos.state.oh.us/SOS/Businesses.aspx. This needs to be done every five years.
    If your group is an IRS 501c3 Non-Profit, you can check your status here:
    https://www.irs.gov/Charities-&-Non-Profits/Exempt-Organizations-Select-Check.  Choose the “Exempt organizations Select Check Tool” near the bottom of the page. This site will tell you if your club is a valid 501c3.

    *Officers E-mail - One club I belong to has e-mail addresses for each officer. They follow the convention of <officer>@ <club name>.org. That way, when we change officers, no one has to remember new addresses. If your club does something similar, make sure that those addresses are updated.

    * Website - Make sure that your officers names, and contact info are updated whenever appropriate. Your website is your clubs front door. Make sure it’s up to date

    *Banking information – If you’ve had a change in officers, Check the signature card for your bank account. If any of the information is no longer accurate, it's time to fill out a new one.

    *Miscellaneous club information - Make sure to transfer all information to the new treasurer, and/or Secretary promptly. This includes passwords for bank accounts, insurance, websites, etc. Anything that requires a password to access should be in the possession of the officer who needs it. It should also be archived with the Secretary.

    *Audit your books - Do your by-laws require a regular audit of the books of your organization? Perhaps now is the time to begin thinking about it.

    Moving along to another subject, I hope a lot of you got involved in the VHF FM Simplex contest on the 14th. Monitoring on 6 Meters, I didn’t hear a lot of activity, and I’m temporarily off of VHF/UHF. It seemed like a good day to sit indoors, and play radio.

    On the subject of radio, Winter Field Day is coming up on the weekend of January 28/29. Operating WFD can be a great club activity, and does not have to be operated out of doors. You can find out more about Winter Field Day atwww.winterfieldday.com/.

    So that will wrap up this month’s column. Stay warm, everyone!


    73 DE KD8MQ

    ***************************************************

    NATIONAL PARKS ON THE AIR
    John Myers, KD8MQ - ACC

    Well, it's over. The final on-the-air Hurrah happened on December 31st.As 2016 ended, so did NPOTA. I’ll miss it, as it was one of the best Ham Radio years that I’ve seen.  .  .  ever! Lots of folks were wishing that it would not end. But, I believe NPOTA needed to end on schedule, if nothing else, to give us all a chance to take a breath, and rest up for the next big thing.

    What’s the next big thing, you ask? I don’t know. For now, I guess it’s whatever you want it to be. I offer the following suggestions to help you transition to a Non-NPOTA world.

      * Try the Parks On The Air program. You can start by uploading your NPOTA logs to Jason, W3AAX. You can learn more about this athttp://wwff-kff.com/. I found that most of the NPOTA units are included in the program. All state parks are also on the list of POTA units. The awards are free, though donations are appreciated.
      * Several States are having State Parks on the air contests, or events; Ohio, Michigan, Florida, Texas, & Indiana are some states that come to mind. The Ohio State Parks On The Air Contest is held each year on the Saturday after Labor Day. You can learn more atospota.org.
      * Offer to organize your clubs 2017 Field Day operation. It’s not too soon. A lot of clubs begin planning the day after their previous years Field Day.
      * Do a club program on your experience with NPOTA, and what you've learned in the past year. Think you didn’t learn anything? Surprise! I bet you did! Share your enthusiasm, and newfound experiences with others.
      * Chase counties, or activate them. I don’t claim to be an expert on County Hunting, but one place where I found a bunch of information is the Mobile Amateur Radio Awards Club website atmarac.org.
      * Chase islands – Check outusislands.org for more information. There’s also the RSGB Islands On The Air Program athttps://www.rsgbiota.org/.
      * Chase Lighthouses on the air. The Amateur Radio Lighthouse Society can be found athttp://arlhs.com/.
      * And of course, Chase DX! Here’s a good place to start.www.arrl.org/dxcc

    As you can see, there’s a lot of on the air possibilities to keep you occupied. If you are going through NPOTA withdrawal, why not give one of these a try?

    We have a couple more weeks to go before the January 31st upload deadline is reached. Last week, I took an evening to audit my log, and managed to bump my chaser numbers over the 100 mark which was my goal. In a lot of cases, I had simply forgotten to upload the contact. In other cases, I simply fat-fingered the Callsign.

    The ARRL certificates for chaser, Activator, and Honor Roll are available. From what I’m seeing on line, they are arriving quickly. You can order your certificates throughnpota.arrl.org. They are $19 each, and come printed with your score at the time of ordering. So, my recommendation is to wait until after January 31st before ordering.

    Lastly, you’ve probably seen this if you are a member of the NPOTA Facebook group. But, here it is again:

    Top 10 things on a NPOTA Activator's To-Do list

    1) Post a well-worn set of Hamsticks to the club swap & shop reflector
    2) Buy another new set of tires
    3) Design an operating chair for the shack that is as comfortable as a car seat
    4) Get to work on a Year-long backlog of To-Do list items around the house
    5) Continue to hound Emily, KB3VVE for her cookie recipe.
    6) Reconnect with family. Apologize to daughter for missing wedding.
    7) Clean a years’ worth of fast-food bags from backseat
    8) Re-introduce myself to the neighbors.
    9) Design an operating desk that looks like a picnic table
    10) Hit F5 yet again; watch for any change in the leaderboard standings

    And that’s it for this month. 73, and watch for my final NPOTA column in the February Ohio Section Journal.

    73,
    John, KD8MQ

    ****************************************************

    THE SECTION EMERGENCY COORDINATOR
    Stan Broadway, N8BHL

    The year 2017 for ARES

    First, I want to promise you all that we are NOT doing anything on the scale of the RNC this year. That is a once-in-a-lifetime event as far as I’m concerned.

    But what ~are~ we going to do?  We have a lot of items on our agenda! First, acting on Proverbs 11:14: “Where there is no guidance, a people falls, but in an abundance of counselors there is safety” I want to bring the leadership of ARES together January 29. All ASEC’s and DEC’s and the crew from The Sarge have been invited to collaborate on how we can continue the growth and excellent posture of ARES in Ohio. You have all worked so hard to achieve what we did in 2016, I want to honor that with a solid program for the future!

    Here are some of the things we already have on the agenda—get your calendars out!

    First, January 14thwill be the second annual ARES VHFSIMPLEX CONTEST. Rules are basically the same as last year, with the addition of 6 meters!  I would prefer using 6 FM simplex rather than SSB but I think there may be MORE people on 6 SSB…so run what ya brung!  I am more interested in numbers, and in coverage areas so we can get an idea of what we would need in order to put together a reliable state network on 6.  I am enthusiastic, but my enthusiasm is tempered by those old heads with years of 6, who are saying it might not be what I hope. We’ll just have to test and see!

    For DEC’s and ASEC’s we’re having a planning meeting January 29. We hope to discuss a lot of items, including (with the Sarge’s crew) how we’re going to cope with the next few years of lousy band conditions.

    For everyone, April 1 is the date set for the 2017 OHIO ARES CONFERENCE!  Write it down, and get ready for some really good stuff!  The conference will be held again at the Marion Technical campus (OSU Marion) as it was last year.

    Here’s another new date:  Mark down April 22 as this year’s NVIS ANTENNA DAY! We’ll have more information as time moves along, but be researching your antennas now!

    We are doing very well in training Many thanks to Jim Yoder, W8ERW, who is keeping track of our Ohio ARES Training Database!  What is happening, I suspect, is that we do not have ALL your certificates in the database. Many members have handed them to their local EC’s which is great, but we need to have jpg copies of your certificates in the state database!  So EC’s- and anyone, actually- you can go to the ARRL-Ohio website’s ARES pages and find the list of who’s included by name and by county. Double check your people, and send those we don’t already have!

    There are 500 names in that database, with 3.263 courses logged!  303 have the four FEMA courses.  Again, my suspicion is we have far more than that, so check!  At any rate, we are far ahead of the rest of the country and you are all to be commended!   Those who haven’t done these courses, try dedicated a couple winter evenings and get ‘r done!

    You might be interested to know that because of our work with Red Cross during the RNC, a fresh interest has brought the Red Cross and ARES much closer. We have been meeting to discuss how amateur radio and the Red Cross can partner more closely to provide statewide communications. They have a few MARCS radios, but ARES is in a great position to become much more active with the ARC. This will be another great arm of service we can provide! Stay tuned!

    Again my congratulations and my sincere thanks for all you do!!  Now…a new year, a new opportunity, and off we go!

    For the latest Section Emergency Coordinator’s monthly report go to:  


    73, Stan, N8BHL

    ****************************************************

    THE PUBLIC INFORMATION COORDINATOR
    John Ross, KD8IDJ


    2017 Newsletter Contest

    Yee Haw!!! That’s public information speak for…the 2017 Newsletter Contest is off to a great start!

    I’ve received over a dozen January newsletters so far and, as I expected, the trend of excellence is continuing. Keep them coming. Remember you need to submit two copies from different months to qualify but most folks send one in every month…and I appreciate that.

    If you have a web-only newsletter…shoot me a quick email to let us know the new version is ready for viewing. I’ll save the link and the judges will look directly at the website.

    The rules are on the Ohio Section website: http://arrl-ohio.org/pic_page/pic.html  but call or email if you have concerns. Goo

    SOS

    When I was learning Morse Code as a kid the fist “word” I learned to send was SOS. It was easy since the all of those letters pretty much make up my last name (ROSS)!

    Well, one of the Christmas gifts I received was an LED flashlight that automatically sends SOS with a couple of button pushes! I’m pretty amazed how I discovered it. I was working changing a recessed light bulb and trying to check the socket. I pushed the on button and the light begin to flash and…somehow…I knew almost immediately it was SOS!!! The old ham who taught me code did a pretty good job.

    And while we’re on the subject of flashing objects...the Capitol Records building in Los Angles has a tall spiral on top with a red light that flashes, in code, CAPITOL RECORDS!!! The light can be reprogrammed to flash the title of their new CD or any other message they want.  I’m not sure Mr. Morse would approve.

    So the next time you’re in LA…drop by and brush up on your code practice. 

    Social Media…We Were First!

    As Social Media…Twitter, Snap Chat, Texting…continues to grow the analysis of its impact is becoming more challenged. Just how effective are these new forms of communication and do they do more harm than good.

    Well, when it comes to new methods of communicating it’s important to remember that Amateur Radio is, and always been, first…in every way…creating and improving just how we talk to each other. We have the high bands, the low bands, microwave, satellite, code, sideband, RTTY, EME, SSTV, Packet and now DMR. We have repeaters, a technology known today and Cell Phones! Nearly a dozen or more ways to effectively to communicate…and consistently communicate…without interruption and without damaging reputations and world order.

    What we do as Amateur Radio operators is all for the good…and all good…and we keep doing it and improving every day. When it comes to the real Social Media…WE WERE FIRST!

    I suppose this all seems a little esoteric but I think about it every time I see new headline quoting social media as the source of a major story. It makes me cringe and appreciate what we as hams do and the way we do it. We report and educate our stories responsibly using reliable technology with ethics and professionalism.

    One final word from the soapbox…. We have one other form of communication that works…the newsletters our clubs send every month. Well written papers without hidden agendas from editors and writers who care about their readers and the hobby they’re writing about.

    WOW! What a great movement with which to associated!!


    73,

    John, KD8IDJ

    ****************************************************

    THE SECTION TRAFFIC MANAGER
    David Maynard, WA3EZN - STM

    WHO OWNS THE NET

    DISCLAIMER: The article below pertains to the State of Ohio only.  It contains some of my opinions and some information gleaned from some websites. It does not pertain to any other state, section or region but only to nets within Ohio. No individual or organization owns any Amateur Radio Frequencies. The frequencies we operate on belong to the government and we are given the privilege to use the frequencies through the licensing procedure.

    WHAT IS A NET?

    An amateur radio net, or simply net, is an on the air meeting of licensed amateur radio operators. Most nets convene on a regular schedule and specific frequency and are organized for a particular purpose, such as relaying messages, discussing a common topic of interest, in severe weather (for example, during a Skywarn activation), emergencies, or simply as a regular gathering of friends for conversation

    The word net is short for network. Networks can be defined as groups of equipment, individuals, and/or agencies acting together to increase efficiency and effectiveness through shared information and resources. The word network can be further broken down into its two components. Net implies a capture and holding effect. Work implies that something productive is to be accomplished.

    The purpose of any net is to provide a means for orderly communication within a group of stations. In a directed net, a net control station (NCS) organizes and controls all activity. Directed nets are the best format when there are a large number of member stations. Nets are either directed (formal) or undirected (informal or open).  Ham radio operators and nets capture, record, hold, and distribute information so that they may work more effectively.

    It is an enjoyable and valuable public service to acquire and maintain traffic handling proficiency. Traffic handlers and traffic nets are prepared to handle both routine and emergency traffic, whenever the need arises.

    WHO OWNS THE NET?

    Some nets in Ohio connected with the ARES Group(s) or a club may be owned by those organizations. Other nets like most traffic nets are not owned by any individual.  They were formed by individuals with a common interest and are governed by bylaws and/or operating procedures.  The net manager is in charge of the net.
    What is a Net Managers?

    Nets are run by either an appointed section net manager or an elected net manager.  Elected net mangers are elected by the voting members of the net. The net manager is responsible for the running of the net, appointing assistant net managers, net control stations and liaison stations.  In the absence of the appointed net control station or liaison station volunteers fill the positions for that net.

    The number of Net Managers may depend on an area's geographical size, the number of nets operating in the section, or other factors having to do with the way the area is organized. In some cases, there may be only one net manager in charge of the one area net, or one Net Manager for the phone net, one for a CW net. In larger or more traffic-active areas there may be several Net Managers for HF and VHF nets, for a RTTY or a digital net.  All ARRL Nets not controlled by the Emergency Coordinator should work under the Section Traffic Manager (STM) and report their activity to the STM monthly.

    WHAT IS A NET CONTROL STATION?
     
    A Net Control Station(NCS) calls the net to order, takes check-ins for the net and directs the flow of traffic during the net.  Its the job of the NCS to control traffic and enforce circuit discipline within a given net.  He or she keeps track of the number of check-in, how much traffic is passed and the length of the nets.  The NCS reports this information to the net manager or his designated statistician along with the call letters of any Liaison stations.  This is an important job that any licensed amateur can do.   

    WHAT IS A LIAISON STATION?

    A Liaison Station is a station that takes traffic from one net to another. If we had a message on the VHF net that needed to go to Texas we would pass it to a liaison station who in turn would take the message to an HF, where a liaisons station will take the traffic to a higher level net that moves traffic to nets around the country. The Liaison station while on the HF net would look for traffic for the Liaison's state or area to take back to it's VHF net for delivery.

    As you can see the Liaison Station would need to have a General class license or higher because he must work with an HF net.  All other positions on a VHF net can be filled by Technicians licensee.

    WHERE DO YOU FIT IN TO A NET?

    Stations that want to participate in the net check in at the invitation of the NCS. This is accomplished when the NCS asking for check-ins. Often nothing more is needed than a short check in with one's callsign. The NCS will acknowledge your checking in with your callsign to let you know you are checked in. Now you are a member of the net. The NCS logs your call for the session count and if you don't have any more to say or report then you just monitor until you are called or the net ends.  If you know of a net and have never participated in it and don't know what to say, just announce your callsign. You should always be welcome!

    But your responsibility does not end there.  If you are going to be a regular check-in you have a duty to support the net. Joining a net is like owning a car.  You open the door and set in the seat, start it up and go.  But if you don't put gasoline in the tank, check the oil and service the car it won’t be long before the car doesn't go.

    It’s the same with a net.  If all you ever do is simply check in and nothing more the net will “run out of gas” and cease to operate. As an amateur radio operator and net check-in you cannot and should not expect the Net Manager or any one person to be the only net control station or liaison station.  You have a responsibility to help the net grow by volunteering. 

    HELP WANTED!

    Ask you net manager if you can help.  Otherwise he or she will never know you are willing to help. We are always looking for additional Net Control Stations to help out. There are two possibilities – one, as an occasional relief operator, and two, as a “regular” NCS one evening per week. Plenty of free coaching and advice is available if you’re interested. All Net Control operators are nervous when first starting out, but it soon becomes a rewarding experience. Please contact your net manager and help keep your net alive.

    SO WHO OWNS THE NET?

    So you can see that if you check into the net you own a piece of the net.  If you don't help run the net there will eventually be no net as those doing all the work will get “burned out.”

    If you only have a Technician license these are some of the Ohio VHF Traffic Nets.

    BRTN             Burning River Traffic Net serving Cleveland and North Central Ohio
                            W8DJG NET MANAGER
    COTN            Central Ohio Traffic Net serving Columbus and Central Ohio
    W8ARR NET MANAGER
    MVTN                       Miami Valley Traffic Net serving the Dayton area
    KC8HTP NET MANAGER
    NWOHARES  Northwest Ohio ARES Net
                            N8TNV NET MANAGER
    TATN            Tri-State Amateur Traffic Net
    WG8Z NET MANAGER
    TCTTN           Tri-County Traffic and Training Net serving Lake, Geauga, Ashtabula and Surrounding Counties KI8U NET MANAGER

    Here is where and when they meet.

    BRTN             NIGHTLY      147.150   110.9   9:30   NEED NET CONTROLS
    COTN             NIGHTLY       146.970    23.0    7:15
    MVTN                       MON THUR SAT 146.640  7PM
    NWOHARES            NIGHTLY      146.940     103.5  6:40
    TATN                        NIGHTLY       145.370                8:00
    TCTTN                       SUNDAY TUESDAY FRIDAY    9 PM 147.015 110.9HZ

    Unfortunately, the BRTN will be scaling back to two days a week on their nets do to a lack of support from its membership and a lack of net control station.

    You will need a General class license or higher to check into the HF nets. These Ohio NTS HF nets meet daily and here are their frequencies, times and net managers.  All licensed hams are welcome to check in with or without radiogram traffic.

    BN(E)            Buckeye Net Early – CW –  WB8YLO NET MANAGER – 3580 at 6:45 PM
    BN(L)             Buckeye Net Late  – CW –  WB9LBI NET MANAGER –   3590 at 10:00 PM
    OSN               Ohio Slow Net        – CW –  W8OLO NET MANAGER –   3.53535 at 6 PM
    OSSBN           Ohio Single Sideband Net – Phone – KC8WH NET MANAGER –
                            3972.5 at 10:30 AM, 4:15 PM AND 6:45 PM

    Well that's my story and I'm sticking to it.  Just remember if you are not part of the solution you will be a part of the problem.

    For the latest Section Traffic Monthly Report go to:  http://arrl-ohio.org/stm/stm.html

    73


    David WA3EZN
    Ohio Section Traffic Manager
    ****************************************************

    OUT AND ABOUT

    Lyn Alfman, N8IMW - Assistant Section Manager

    Sonny and I attended many holiday gatherings with friends and family members.  We went to Ogleby Park to see the light display as well as visited downtown Cambridge with its Dickens Victorian Village and the courthouse, which has three light shows each evening in sync with Christmas music being played, with some family members.  We spent the entire week between Christmas and New Year’s Day with family since those in South Carolina came for a visit. We visited with all seven of the children, fourteen of seventeen grandchildren, and two of the seven great grandchildren during the month of December. We had a good time, and we hope your Holidays were as enjoyable!

    I, along with other members of the Cambridge Amateur Radio Association, helped with registration and communications for the first annual Byesville Christmas Parade on December 3.

    Some of the amateur radio clubs locally - Zanesville Amateur Radio Club and Cambridge Amateur Radio Association-did not have regular meetings this month, but CARA had five Thursday amateur radio lunches.  CARA also had its Awards Banquet on December 10.

    I will be attending the Sunday Creek Amateur Radio Federation Hamfest in Nelsonville on January 15, but I will be on a cruise until January 28, so I may or may not attend the TUSCO Hamfest on January 29 at Strasburg.

    Remember to be “Radio Active”!


    ’73 Lyn, N8IMW  

    ****************************************************

    ARES TRAINING UPDATE
    Jim Yoder, W8ERW/5

    Winter time doesn't leave us with much excitement other than the inconvenience of snow, ice and frigid temperatures.  Perhaps you do enjoy skiing, ice skating or sledding which I did when I was much younger.  However, you may look forward to the Hamfest season beginning anew, I do.  Otherwise, after the holidays, hibernation isn't a terrible thought.  I'll wake up refreshed and ready for antenna projects outdoors as soon as the sun shines longer each day and it packs some heat along with its daylight.

    Now for some serious thought on ARES training.  The Ohio Section has been quite busy amassing a lot of FEMA NIMS training along with the ARRL EC series classes and others.  When I started logging this training over two years ago, I could see the potential for perhaps 2,500 classes being taken and 250 ARES members participating.  It was a little slow initially as I started working with the data I had received.  Not much was being added with an occasional email submitting a class or two.  My focus was to get all of this into a database that could be easily used to document the training and preserve the information for quick reference as may be needed anytime in the future. 

    SM Scott Yonally N8SY mentioned a few months ago that he felt the training submissions were about to increase and I should expect quite a bit of activity.  He was certainly correct.  It's been a blur of submissions on a daily basis for the last month.  Normally, I was receiving a few additional classes with an occasional submission including all four of the NIMS required courses.  That has changed and many of you are now sending certificates for all of the NIMS required courses and more.  You are also reporting the ARRL EC series classes and relevant training associated with your emergency responder work. 

    Let me share these impressive numbers with you.  I hope this stirs up some excitement and motivates those of you who have not taken or submitted your NIMS training to do so.  The momentum here is amazing.

                                                                01-05-2017     01-11-2017   01-15-2017
    Members included in the database -          529               554                561
    Training ClassesSubmitted -                   3,400            3,570             3,631    
    Members completing Required NIMS-   333                348                356

    I've been reporting these numbers back to your Section Manager and Section Emergency Coordinator and the comments I get are "Awesome", "Super" and "This is Great".  The sustained effort you are putting into this has also been noticed by ARRL in Newington.  Ohio is a great place to be a Ham and the great Hams of Ohio never fail to pick up a ball and run with it.  Thank you for this effort.

    You might have dismissed this push for NIMS training like I initially did.  I have never been a fan of big government and this looked like another attempt to run roughshod over us by an ever increasing "Big Brother" poking his nose into our lives.  Luckily, I thought better of it and decided to have a look.  You can't change things or complain if you don't know what you are talking about. 

    The NIMS training is well thought out and you will find like I did, that it is the process many of our employers are using to deal with business emergencies as well as disasters that touch their business operations.  NIMS has been and continues to be developed with input from everyone who has a vested interest in managing disaster.  It is a well thought out process that is entirely logical and capable of delivering the result we all want to achieve, quickly responding to and resolving an emergency situation in the most efficient way possible.  NIMS is the vehicle being used on a local, state and national level to respond to disaster.  This training is essential for those of us who volunteer during a disaster.  You simply will not be of much use if you don't understand this process.  No, you won't be an expert, but you will have the knowledge required to be of critical value as a communicator within ARES.  This isn't "Big Brother".  It is all of us participating together doing our part in a well organized effort toward a common goal.  I encourage all of you who want to be a part of ARES and volunteer your time and skills to also get involved with NIMS training.  When you do, be sure to submit your certificates to the database.  This will insure that when needed, your training can be documented to the appropriate agency that will require it.

    So, let me say Thank you again and I will continue to update you on this really great momentum in the Ohio Section.  Also, you can look on the Ohio Section Web Site, arrlohio.org in the ARES section for a current listing of those who have completed all four of the required NIMS courses.  SM Scott Yonally N8SY updates the list regularly for your reference.  You can also email me with any questions regarding the training database,w8erw@arrl.net  Training documentation can also be sent to me along with any changes to residence, call sign, email address etc.  The preferred method of submitting training is in .pdf format.  You can scan the certificates, save to .pdf and email them.  FEMA will also send an electronic certificate after class completion.  You can forward those as well as requesting online, your current transcript electronically.  I am storing the certificate copies in the following format:  W8ERW-IS-00100.b.pdf  This will make it easy to locate them and provide them to any serving agency we support when required.

    The Mansfield Hamfest is coming.  Do enjoy it and take those FEMA NIMS courses while you're resting.

    Thanks and 73,


    Jim W8ERW

    ****************************************************
     
    LET'S TALK
    Scott Yonally, N8SY - Section Manager


    Hey Gang,

    Have you seen the NEWEST “Handbook Giveaway” drawing on the website yet? It’s there..!! To enter the drawing all you need to do is fill in a couple of boxes on the form.. (your name and email). That’s you need to do to be entered into a drawing to win a 2016 ARRL softcover Handbook. There’s nothing else required (Oh.. You do need to be a resident of Ohio to win..)   The winner will be mailed the Handbook at my cost. This is being offered just to see how many folks are really checking in on the website. Got the idea? Best of luck to you!!

    Are you getting those emails from me? If not, all you have to do is to “Opt-In” to receive them. Heck, just send me an email   n8sy@n8sy.com   I’ll get you added to the mailing list. There’s a link to do this on the Ohio Section website, it’s on the bottom left corner. For your convenience. Here’s a direct link to it:  http://arrl-ohio.org/forwarder/forwarding.html  I urge all of you to make sure that everyone, regardless of whether they are a League member or not, gets signed up for one of these options. You can always “Opt-Out” at any time if you feel this is not what you were expecting. 

    Let’s talk about the Ohio Section website. You can find the Ohio Section Website at:  http://arrl-ohio.org  If you don’t have this website set as your home page, I urge you to do so. It changes a lot and it’s so important for you to be kept up to date with the very latest information.

    On that same subject, there’s another NEW – one question – questionnaire on the Ohio Section Website! This question is really important for me to know. It will only take about 2 seconds for you to answer it, and you can see how your answer stacks up with others instantly. If you haven’t done it yet, please do. I really want to hear from you.

    Are you a member of the ARRL?? If you aren’t a League member, this is a great opportunity to become one. Want more information on how to join? Here’s the link:http://www.arrl.org/membership-levels. There’s even a 90 day FREE trial that you can apply for if you’ve never been a member.. Got questions about being a member or what the League is all about? Send me an email n8sy@n8sy.com   I’ll be happy to call or write to you. We can even meet and have coffee if you’d like, and I’ll buy!!

    I’m sure all of you have heard me say that I’m always available for you, whether you’re an ARRL member or not. It’s true, and you can feel free to write or call me anytime. If you have any questions, concerns, or would just like to sit and chat awhile over a cup of coffee or something cold to drink, feel free to call or write me
    (419) 512-4445 or n8sy@n8sy.com  

    That’s going to do it for this month. I hope to see you all at your hamfests, club meetings or on the air!

    73, Scott, N8SY

    ****************************************************
     
    THE OFFICIAL OBSERVER COORDINATOR
    John Perone, W8RXX

    Total hours were 696

    4 OO cards were sent

    0 Good operator cards


    73, John, W8RXX

    ****************************************************

    WEBSITE STATS – ** arrl-ohio.org **

    December 2016

    Pages
    Hits
    Bandwidth
    49,621
    125,618
    2.21 GB

    ****************************************************

    SPECIAL EVENTS STATIONS IN OHIO

    01/28/2017 | 2nd Annual Cabin Fever Special Event
    Jan 28, 1700Z-2300Z, K8PRC
    Loudonville, OH.
    Pedestrian Amateur Radio Club.
    14.250 14.050 7.250 7.050
    QSL. K8PRC, 1661 Manor Ave NW
    Canton, OH 44708
     
    *-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*

    Portage County Amateur Radio Service, Inc.
    PCARS - K8BF
    Twelfth Annual"Freeze Your Acorn Off"
    (FYAO) Special Event Station
    When: Saturday - Feb. 11, 2017
    Operating Time: 10am - 4pm EST

    We will be active on CW, Digital & Phone in the
    10, 15, 20, 40 and 80 meter bands (Repeater & Echolink
    on the K8SRR echo link node for a certificate)
    and anything else we can get working.
    Club Call Sign K8BFfor a certificate.

    Other participating stations will be using their own
    callsign/FYAO, or calling “CQ FYAO” (only stations at the Freeze
    Your Acorns Off event should use the /FYAO designator).

    Yes, we'll be braving the cold snowy weather of North Eastern
    Ohio to set up QRP stations using portable power and antennas.

    A beautiful color (suitable for framing) 8" x 10"
    certificate is available if you contact K8BF and

    send your QSL with a large SASE to the club call trustee:
    Bob Hewett, K8FEY - 3670 Sea Ray Cove
    Reminderville, OH 44202

    So, from the comfort of your warm radio shack –
    give us a contact while we're out freezing.
    We'll need all the contacts we can make to help keep us warm.
    Your support will be very much appreciated!

    Check PCARS out on the web at:www.portcars.org  

    Questions? Contact Chuck, W8PT atW8PT@portcars.org

    *-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*

    02/18/2017 | WRARC 7th Anniversary
    Feb 18, 1500Z-2300Z,
    W8WRC, New Springfield, OH.
    Western Reserve Amateur Radio Club.
    21.300 14.305 7.200.
    QSL. Western Reserve Amateur Radio Club,
    2050 East South Range Road,
    New Springfield, OH 44443.

    ****************************************************
     
    OHIO HAMFEST CALENDAR

    01/29/2017 | TUSCO Amateur Radio Club Hamfest
    Location: Strasburg, OH
    Sponsor: Tusco Amateur Radio Club
    Website: 
    http://tuscoarc.org  

    02/19/2017 | Mansfield Mid Winter Hamfest
    Location: Mansfield, OH
    Sponsor: Intercity Amateur Radio Club

    ****************************************************

    A final – final.. Hey Everyone, Amateur Radio is a lot of FUN.. and it’s a learning experience for everyone! Share your enjoyment and learning experiences with those just coming into Amateur Radio!!  


    eof..








  7. In this issue:

    -> SPECIAL - HANDBOOK GIVEAWAY

    -> SECOND ANNUAL OHIO ARES VHF SIMPLEX CONTEST

    -> THE TECHNICAL COORDINATOR

    -> AFFILIATED CLUB COORDINATOR REPORT

    -> NATIONAL PARKS ON THE AIR

    -> THE SECTION EMERGENCY COORDINATOR

    -> THE PUBLIC INFORMATION COORDINATOR

    -> THE SECTION TRAFFIC MANAGER

    -> FROM THE SCOUTING ASM

    -> OUT AND ABOUT

    -> CENTRAL OHIO HAPPENINGS

    -> ARES TRAINING UPDATE

    -> LET'S TALK

    -> THE OFFICIAL OBSERVER COORDINATOR

    -> WEBSITE STATS

    -> SPECIAL EVENT STATIONS IN OHIO

    -> KIDS DAY

    -> OHIO HAMFEST CALENDAR

    ****************************************************

    SPECIAL - HANDBOOK GIVEAWAY

    It's Christmas, and I'm in the Christmas Spirit for sure! This month we will be doing a very special giveaway just for Christmas. I'm not going to spill the beans on just what is going to be given out, but I will tell ya' that it's going to be more than just a 2017 ARRL Handbook!!

    Just go to: http://arrlohio.org and look for the big red arrow on the left side of the page. Click on the arrow and complete the form, that's it! If you enter before 11:59pm December 24th, you'll automatically be entered for a second chance at a Handbook at the end of the month too! Yup, I'm going to give another Handbook out on New Year’s Day!!

    What's the catch? There isn't any.. If you live in Ohio, all you have to do to be entered is to fill out the form. You'll even be emailed a copy of the completed form back to you as your confirmation that you're entered. It won't cost you anything!! And no, you don't have to be an ARRL member to participate!  A new drawing is held each month, and in order to be eligible, you do have to enter each month. You can't win if you don't enter. So what have you got to loose!!

    Please, only one submission per person. The first drawing will end on December 24, 2016 at 11:59pm EST and the second drawing will end on December 31st at 11:59pm EST.

    The Christmas winners will be announced on Christmas morning - December 25th and you'll find out then what all the other prizes were. The next drawing for the 2nd Handbook will be announced on New Year’s Day. Each winner will be notified by email, so PLEASE use a valid email when completing the form, this is the only way I have of contacting you if you win.


    73, and good luck to all.. MERRY CHRISTMAS!

    ****************************************************

    SECOND ANNUAL OHIO ARES VHF SIMPLEX CONTEST

    ANNOUNCING >> The Second Annual Ohio ARES VHF Simplex Contest! January 14, 2917.

    After a lot of requests, we are opening this up to 6 meters as a part of your score as well!  There is a lot of potential for wide-area coverage on that band, and we need to cultivate some interest- so, for the sixers out there, burn eggs on your beam!!

    Some questions, and answers:

    - On the bonus situations, the EOC bonus is exactly what it says- operation must be from an EOC, not a
    nearby trailer or remote location. EOC ops, add 50 points to your total contact score. Operation from
    any portable location (trailer, tent, park bench, igloo) is 100 points added to your total contact
    score. Contact an ARES officer of any type, add 5 points to that contact (in other words, if your contact says he’s an EC, it’s worth 6 points.)

    - On digital. All modes are open, we’ve had some questions as to ‘which’ mode. Any of the modes
    commonly accepted for NBEMS work!

    - Frequencies haven’t been mentioned. Grab any you like- if your district has a prescribed simplex
    frequency, try that first. Anything except a repeater. Make sure you get the county or location of your
    contact- the whole point is to be able to plot your best coverage area. Look for ‘real’ signal reports.

    - You know what? If you get bored and want to fry some eggs on your six-meter antennas, go for it. DO INCLUDE your six contacts in your score!

    - HAVE FUN!

    Here are the rules again!

    Purpose
    ARES is tasked with being able to provide communications “When all else fails.” Local communication is critical and typically takes place on the VHF or UHF amateur band. In order to improve our ability to perform on these bands, Ohio Section ARES is sponsoring the ARES VHF Contest (Yeah, we know, but calling it the Ohio VHF / UHF Contest got a little long-winded). Participants in the contest are encouraged to make as many contacts as possible within the time-frame of the contest, with as many different geographical locations as the bands permit. The contest is open to all amateur operators, ARES members are strongly encouraged to participate. How else are you going to win the ‘bragging rights session of your next ARES meeting?

    When did you say it was?
    The contest is January 14, 2017.The start time is (for those of us who sleep in) 10 AM through 6 PM Eastern. Yeah, a civilized time-frame that doesn’t rob sleep, and allows time with the family. Why, you can even watch a few cartoons in the morning!

    Where you gonna be?
    You may operate this contest from anywhere. There are certain benefits for venturing out from your
    warm, comfortable home station. EOC stations can gain extra points. Portable stations can gain even
    MORE extra points – that is, if your frozen fingers will still be able to operate a keyboard. Portable
    stations MUST use portable antennas, nothing permanently attached…kind of like Field Day on ice. We are not going with any mobile operation this time. The image of a bunch of vehicles running around with portable towers, 150 pounds of antenna hardware and an occasional grounding anchor is best left to the ARRL contesters.

    Da Bands – a la’ Mode
    Because local emergency communication takes place primarily on the two meter and 70 centimeter
    bands, the contest is limited to those two bands. Within each band, we will have these modes: FM
    Simplex, “Everything else” Simplex; DIGITAL simplex contacts will make up a third mode on each
    band. Contacts with a station count once per mode- if you can talk the other guy into abandoning “his
    frequency” and meeting you on SSB or CW, more power to ya! NO REPEATER CONTACTS WILL
    COUNT. If you get bored, you certainly are welcome to chat amongst yourselves on repeaters, or
    simplex, or cell phones, or smoke signals.

    Da Contacts
    The goal is to contact as many different stations in as many different counties as possible. You can make as many overall contacts as you like, they will then be multiplied by the number of counties you’ve reached. Extra points will be available for contacting an EC, AEC, DEC, ADEC, ASEC or SEC. Pretty simple- any more complex and we’ll confuse the scorekeepers.

    Da Score
    Each FM Simplex contact counts as 1 point.
    Each non- FM simplex contact counts as 1 point.
    Each digital simplex contact counts as 1 point. (Detect a pattern here?)
    Contact with EC, AEC, DEC, ADEC, ASEC or SEC adds 5 points.
    Contact with an EOC or with a portable station adds 5 points.
    Operation from an EOC add 50 points to your total contact score.
    Operation from a portable location add 100 points to your total contact score.
    Total contact score (all bands/modes added together) will be multiplied by the total number of counties you contacted.

    Da Logs
    Please use any of the appropriate computer logging programs, paper dupe sheets, a well-worn slide rule or rusty abacus. Just keep all that to yourself, we can’t find anyone with the time to go through all the detail contacts. Submit an email to: contest@delares.org  with the following:
    Your name:
    Group name:
    Location: (City, county)
    FM Simplex Contacts:
    “Everything else” Simplex Contacts:
    Digital Simplex Contacts:
    EOC bonus:
    Portable bonus:
    Total Contact Score (Add above together, but you figured that out already):
    Multiply by total number of counties contacted (include your own!):
    Bask in the glory of a well thought out, well executed effort!

    Definition of acronyms..
    EOC = Emergency Operations Center
    NBEMS = Narrow Band Emergency Messaging System
    ARES = Amateur Radio Emergency Service
    SM = Section Manager
    SEC = Section Emergency Coordinator
    ASEC = Assistant Section Emergency Coordinator
    DEC = District Emergency Coordinator
    ADEC = Assistant District Emergency Coordinator
    EC = Emergency Coordinator
    AEC = Assistant Emergency Coordinator
    CW = Continuous Wave
    SSB = Single-Side Band
    FM = Frequency Modulation

    ****************************************************

    THE TECHNICAL COORDINATOR
    Jeff Kopcak – TC

    Hey gang,

    In October, I was invited by Medina County ARES to see a presentation about Winlink.  I had heard of it as a way to send email messages over the HF bands.  There were rumors around whether specialized hardware was needed and I really wanted to see what it was all about.  Rick - K8CAV gave a great presentation on how it all works and some tips that really helped me get operating on Winlink.

    Winlink, in short, is a way to send email via radio circuits frequently used by RV campers, boaters, and mariners where the Internet may not be available or reliable.  It is a store and forward system meaning your messages will be held and delivered when you call into a gateway, much like the dial-up or BBS days.  There are a number of ways the software will operate: connect to a remote gateway station over the air, operate peer-to-peer over-the-air, connect via the Internet using Telnet (yeah, yeah ‘telnet isn’t secure’ but neither is your email going out over the air), or webmail.  Winlink has regional Central Messaging Servers (CMS) which connect to the Radio Messaging Servers (RMS) over the Internet.  The RMS is the gateway your client connects to for sending and receiving messages over-the-air.

    There is little privacy as other stations can read your messages but the intent is to have a worldwide emergency email messaging system.  Messages can be exchanged with any email address (Gmail, your ISP) on the Internet using the assigned callsign@winlink.org email address.  Stations conducting business will likely get blocked from the RMS gateways.  Attachments can be included with messages but due to bandwidth, these should be kept to small files like CSV or TXT files – no multi-megapixel images or videos.

    There are three pieces to the Winlink client software: RMS Express is the ‘90’s looking email client, Winmor - the modem, and ITS HF Propagation is a third party software program that works with Winmor to determine propagation for connection reliability.  I got Winlink setup and working with my radio and SignaLink so no specialized hardware is required.  A lot of back-and-forth transmit and receiving happens between the client and gateway.  The TX/RX turn-around time needs to happen quickly (under 200ms), longer will require a high number of retransmissions.  One tip to help minimize the delay: set the SignaLink delay control no further than the second hash mark (8 o’clock position).  To get started, go toftp://autoupdate.winlink.org.  Click “User Programs.”  Download and install “Winlink Express Install,” and “itshfbc” to their default locations.  To get an account created on the system, you need to send one email to an Internet address such as your personal email.  In addition, Winlink has an “APRSLink” where you can check for messages, read, compose, forward, and delete all by sending APRS messages.  Feel free to send me a message to “my call” at winlink.org.  More:http://www.winlink.org/

    I’ve also been playing around with a new device from Shark RF called the OpenSpot.  It’s a small company with two guys in Estonia (South of Finland).  Production is done on a batching basis so there is a waiting list.  It seems like they’re shipping units close to once per month.  Once I got the shipping notice, I had the device within a week.  They say 3-6 business days shipping time and it arrived certainly within that range.  The OpenSpot is a standalone digital radio gateway otherwise known as a hotspot.  It currently supports DMR (Brandmeister, DMR+), D-STAR (DPlus/REF, DCS, XRF/DExtra, XLX), and System Fusion (FCS, YSFReflector).  If the mode or network isn’t supported, they do take requests and will make additions available via firmware upgrades.  Since it is a hotspot device a transceiver capable of operating that mode is required.  They are doing something cool since DMR and Fusion use the AMBE2 codec.  A DMR radio can be used to access the Fusion network and vice-versa (DMR Talk Groups with a Fusion radio).

    The OpenSpot has a lot of flexibility, very well designed, and is superior to the DV4Mini.  It doesn’t need different Raspberry Pi images for different modes like the DVMega.  The device comes with everything: the OpenSpot hotspot, Ethernet cable, USB cable, USB power adapter, and antenna.  It runs an internal webserver for device configuration.  I even like how they do the firmware update process.  The OpenSpot shows up as a drive to the computer and using the copy command - copy the firmware to it and voilà - done.  For DMR, it will operate like a DV4Mini with the radio configured in TG 9 (talk-group) or it will operate like a repeater (my preference) where the Talk Groups are push-to-talk.  All the TAC groups are available (310, 311, 312, etc) and call routing works.  I could not get these to go on the DV4Mini.  D-STAR works great too.  You can link and unlink to reflectors using radio commands.  It does not have a drop down for linking directly to a D-STAR repeater on the network.  The only systems listed are reflectors.  Forum posts describe how to link to a D-STAR repeater (like a DVAP or DNGL would do) using the “Advanced Mode” screens.

    It’s not great for portability as it comes (in a car, for example).  I have not tried any of the USB to Ethernet adapters with my smartphone or tried a Raspberry Pi as a Wi-Fi to Ethernet bridge.  OpenSpot requires an Ethernet cable connection meaning no Wi-Fi though there are plans to add this and uses USB for power and firmware upgrades.  As with these devices in DMR mode, they do not transmit a valid call sign.  The radio ID is not valid identification.  If you listen to a repeater in FM it will ID in CW.  Unfortunately, the cost is about twice that of the DV4Mini 182.50 € which, when I ordered, was about $235 including shipping. More:https://www.sharkrf.com/

    Other new tech (Christmas gifts?).  With advancements in Software-Defined Radios (SDR) I’m seeing a new breed of devices hams can use as radios: your smartphone.  Well, at least something that resembles a smartphone or tablet – still need the additional hardware.  A device out of the UK called “MyDel Hamfone Smartphone Transceiver” is available.  It offers a 3G cellphone, 70cm transceiver (500mw/1W) with camera, expandable SD card, and GPS.  The few reviews are positive but there is some question if its FCC certified in the US.  More:http://www.hamradio.co.uk/amateur-radio-handheld-radio-mydel-handhelds/mydel/mydel-hamfone-smartphone-transceiver-pd-6093.php

    Bob - W2CYK and the guys over at RFinder (the online repeater directory of the ARRL) have released the “RFinder Android Radio.”  Their device integrates 4G LTE & GSM cell technologies alongside FM (DMR is also available) radios into a device with the RFinder repeater directory database.  The directory offers coverage maps and switching repeaters is a point-and-click away.  They also boast the elimination of codeplugs for DMR.  This is great as finding codeplugs, or the information for one, is not always readily available.  More:http://androiddmr.com

    This past month, the Parma Radio Club invited me to their meeting to give the Raspberry Pi presentation.  There was a lot of good discussion and questions.  This is always good to hear because you know the audience is engaged, thinking, and ultimately providing real-time feedback on the presentation.  Thanks for having me at your meeting.  More:http://www.parmaradioclub.com/

    Don’t forget, National Parks on the Air will be wrapping up at the end of the year.  According to Tom Gallagher - NY2RF, NPOTA is getting closer to #1MillionQSOs:https://twitter.com/hashtag/1millionqsos.  Look out for those NPOTA stations to get your score up for your wallpaper (that is certificate if you don’t operate special events and contests).

    Starting this past fall with the kickoff of new TV seasons, the CW is airing a show called “Frequency” loosely based off the 2000 Sci-Fi thriller of the same name.  It starred Dennis Quaid and Jim Caviezel as father and son, Frank and John Sullivan.  This was big with hams because the movie incorporated something that resembled ham-radio which allowed the father and son to talk 30 years into the past and future.  The TV show has gotten positive reviews with a Rotten Tomatoes score of 74% with the biggest criticism being the back-and-forth between now and 20 years in the past.  It airs Wednesday nights at 9pm (Ham Nation time so it gets the DVR treatment here) with the last couple episodes available on the CW website and on Netflix streaming. More:http://www.cwtv.com/shows/frequency/




    Finally, don’t forget the HF Santa Net through Christmas Eve.  Starts at 8:30 pm Eastern and can be found on 3916 kHz for the little ones to have a chance to talk with Santa! More:http://www.3916nets.com/santa-net.html




    Thanks for reading. Happy holidays, Merry Christmas, and Happy New Year!


    73… de Jeff – K8JTK

    ****************************************************

    THE AFFILIATED CLUBS COORDINATOR
    John Myers, KD8MQ - ACC

    Hi everyone,

    Unfortunately, it looks like this year’s winter weather will be a bit more "seasonable". I had intended to do some demo work on my front stoop, so I could begin replacing it in the spring. But, that project will need to wait until spring. In the last month, I’ve been attacking my to-do list. Some of my list items are Amateur Radio Related.

    One example is to contact the local hospital where we hold our club meetings. It's time reserve our room meeting room for the coming year. In the change of club leadership, this is one of those tasks that sometimes get overlooked.

    One of my favorite movies is the "National Treasure" series. in the sequal, part of the plot revolves around the "President's Book". A book written by Presidents, for Presidents eyes only. The concept is an interesting one. When I was club President, I stole the idea. The result was the President's "Letter"; a word document which contains tips and advice for our Club President.

    Among items in the letter are notes of what tasks need to happen, and when. These are things such as meeting room reservations, insurance renewal information, who to contact for various things, etc. I believe it makes for a smoother transition for the incoming President.

    What systems do you have in place to assist your new officers as they transition into their new jobs?  
    I’m happy as I look at the club numbers for the Ohio section. As of the beginning of the month, we have 108 ARRL Affiliated Clubs. 27 of those are Special Service Clubs. We are still not at 100% on filing our paperwork with the league. But, I’ll be contacting some of you in January about updating your club record.

    I’d like to extend a welcome this month to the Geauga ARA; our newest ARRL Affiliated club.

    While we’re at it, I’d like to extend a well-deserved shout to our newest Special Service Club; The Silvercreek ARA, in Wadsworth. I attended their November meeting, along with our Division Director, Dale, WA8EFK, and Section Manager, Scott, N8SY. It was a great evening!

    This holiday season, let’s not forget your members who can’t attend your club meetings, or banquets. That’s right, I’m talking about those Hams who are either Homebound, or perhaps are in the hospital, or nursing home. Especially at this time of year, a visit, or even a card can really lift one's spirits.

    Also, it’s not too early to begin planning for your club activities in the coming year. How about group builds, park activations, Field Day (both Winter, and Summer), field trips, etc.? You get the idea; any event that gets your members together outside of the meeting room is a great thing.

    With that, I’d like to wish all of you a Very Merry Christmas, and Happy New Year.

    73 all and I’ll see you next year.
    DE KD8MQ

    ***************************************************

    NATIONAL PARKS ON THE AIR
    John Myers, KD8MQ - ACC

    Well, it’s almost over! The ARRL National Parks On The Air event officially ends at 2359Z on December 31st. All contacts need to be uploaded to the system no later than 2359Z on January 31st, 2017. What a wild ride it’s been, huh?

    As the year progressed, folks realized that one Million QSOs was an attainable goal. As I write these words, we are nearly there. The number of NPOTA contacts that have been loaded to LOTW totals just shy of 995,000. By the time you read this, the million contact goal will be surpassed. There is talk about setting a new goal of either 1.1 Million contacts, or 20,000 activations.

    As the operating phase of NPOTA ends, we move on to the next phase. This is where we peruse our logs for any missed confirmations, or “Orphan QSOs”. That is, those contacts that you worked, but never got credit for.
    So, how do you go about getting credit for that QSO? An e-mail to the operator (or holder of the callsign) will normally get you that sought after confirmation.  Courtesy of the folks on the NPOTA Facebook group, Here are some tips on inquiring about missed confirmations.

    * Be patient; especially if the activator is doing a lot of activations, they might take a couple of weeks to upload.

    * Before writing the activator, check LoTW to see if the activator shows a log upload after the activation date

    * But, If an activator has done multiple activations he may have just uploaded another log from a different activation, or uploaded a chaser contact. So, if it hasn't been at least two weeks, sit tight.

    * When e-mailing the activator, a screenshot of your log entry attached to the E-Mail would be very helpful.

    * Be polite! Thank the person for activating and taking the time to check the log. Some chasers have reportedly been impatient and rude to activators.

    So, what to do when NPOTA is over? Well, may I suggest the Parks On The Air (POTA) program? All Ohio State Parks are
    now included in the POTA database. The rules are similar to that for NPOTA. i.e. you must be in the park you are claiming, and must make minimum of 10 QSOs to qualify for activator credit.
    You can learn all about this program atwwff-kff.com.

    Oh yes, they have a Facebook Group! Do a Facebook search on parks on the air.

    And that wraps it up for this month. Merry Christmas, and Happy New Year to all of you, and I’ll see you on the bands.


    73,
    John, KD8MQ

    ****************************************************

    THE SECTION EMERGENCY COORDINATOR
    Stan Broadway, N8BHL

    Ohio ARES: 2016 in review

    It’s time to present a summary of ARES in Ohio for the year 2016.  I couldn’t be more proud of your accomplishments this year!  ARES, indeed Amateur Radio, proved itself as a professional and technically proficient operation able to meet the highest federal standards. We played in the “real world” of national security and preparation, and by all accounts we won.  We not only solidified our relationships with many agencies including EMA’s and Red Cross but also gained the respect of Homeland Security and other high level divisions.  Credit belongs to our local and district Emergency Coordinators for long meetings, intense preparation, and executing with great success!

    I don’t need to go through the statewide activities during July’s RNC and related events, you all know how many people were involved and how much time was invested.

    As for the yearend report (including projected numbers to fill out December) Amateur Radio operators nearly doubled the number of public service and actual emergency events.

    Here are our end-of-year projections for 2016, 2015 numbers are in parenthesis.

    Public service events:  790   (414)
    Public service hours:    19,240   (16,070)
    Emergency events:   290   (101)
    Emergency hours:   2,200   (2,138)
    Training events:  1,725      (2,490)
    Training hours:    21,800   (22,168)

    Total events:  2,805    (3,005)
    Total hours:  43,240   (40,376)

    Assuming the most recently reported hourly value of a volunteer to be $23, not including fuel or supplying our own radio equipment, this leads us to conclude that ARES provided $994,520 in volunteer service to our communities, counties, and state.  Estimating cost of equipment at a low of $300 per volunteer, the value increases to over $1.5 million.

    Our training hours were down from last year (perhaps because we were busy actually ~doing~ things) but the number of members who’ve completed FEMA 100, 200, 700 and 800 has steadily increased. Although we aren’t confident we have all your records, our state database shows over 500 members carrying 3,263 course certificates. 303 have completed the four NIMS courses, many more are still on their way. We continue to press for completion, and we have set a standard that ARES volunteers who report to an EOC or emergency operation must have the NIMS courses. Make sure we have your certificates (scans or jpg’s) for the database, and your EC has a printed copy for a log at your EOC.

    In addition to the obvious activities during July, ARES members did a lot more.  Some groups are working on MESH (2.4 GHz digital networking) while others are developing applications in Winlink (RF-based email systems).  Because emergencies don’t provide prior notice, and because the ability to rapidly communicate is absolutely key to handling an event, EOC’s need to maintain the presence of amateur radio gear!  In several counties, ARES organizations are upgrading, expanding and further developing stations. The same is true at the Ohio EOC/JDF, where an entirely new station has been designed with all new radio equipment. Completion of the remodel and installation is expected before the end of this year. Many other groups were busy upgrading communications trailers for emergency response, some in cooperation with CERT.

    ARES members again participated in “NVIS Antenna Day” testing the ability to communicate within the state using HF radio frequencies. In 2015, ARES members participated in our first “ARES VHF Contest”, designed to test and improve our local communication capabilities for those times when everything (even our own repeaters) has failed. It was a great success. Amateur Radio’s “Field Day” event is always a big draw.  And it is very rare to find a marathon or large ride/run that doesn’t depend on ARES volunteers.  Weather systems bring out trained spotters, relaying accurate ground reports to National Weather Service stations.  From bringing aid to a stricken hunter outside of cell phone range to being a standing backup during the RNC to activating to help at an EOC, our ARES volunteers won the confidence of EMA directors, and assumed a higher position of trust.



    The ARES VHF radio contest will be held in 2017 on January 14th!  Look for more information in your emails! I’ll send it to county coordinators who can forward to their members! It should be a great time. With the decreasing sunspot cycles, we will need to evaluate alternate means of getting the message through- and I know you can do that!



    Well done, and I truly appreciate each and every one’s time and efforts!

    For the latest Section Emergency Coordinator’s monthly report go to:  


    73, Stan, N8BHL

    ****************************************************

    THE PUBLIC INFORMATION COORDINATOR
    John Ross, KD8IDJ

    FROM THE PIC
     
    WOW what a year!!! More and more we hear and see Amateur Radio in action in places where we never thought we would be. It’s all good and it’s all because you take this hobby and use it in new ways every day. It’s how we grow and how we show how much we respect Amateur Radio and all of the adventures it has to offer.

    One of the best things we do is write about Amateur Radio and here in Ohio we have the best cadre of Public Information Officers and newsletter editors. We show that every month with a round of newsletters that keep our clubs and communities informed.

    So the 2017 Ohio Section Newsletter Contest is about to open for business on January 1st.

    The rules for the coming year are the same…I need two copies of your newsletters to make it official. Most clubs send me one every month and I can’t tell you how much I appreciate that. I really do read them all and them file them neatly away so the judges can make their decision in early July. Believe me, the competition is great and judges work hard to pick the winners.

    The official rules are on the Ohio Section website:  http://arrl-ohio.org/pic_page/pic.html   If you have a question or concern just send me an email or call anytime.

    Thank you for all of the submissions over the past three years and I know this year will be just as great.

    COLLEGE RADIO CLUBS

    The ARRL is seeking new ways to expand student radio clubs on college campuses. It’s a great idea and a great effort. I’ve included the article form the December 1stNewsletter with the details.

    I know first-hand just how important college radio clubs can be and the rich history they share with Amateur Radio. I wasn’t a member of the OSU Radio Club when I was student (wish I had been) and the stories that club members tell about their experiences are, to say the least, riveting, and show just how important membership can be. My research on the OSU club revealed some documents, stories and logs that go back almost 100 years!

    If you’re active with a college radio club, or know of one in your area, shoot me an email and I’ll make contract. If you have stories about your experiences…I want to hear about those as well. I think we have a lot offer college radio clubs and I’m sure they can help us keep Amateur Radio moving forward.

    Here’s the official ARRL article from the December 1st ARRL Letter:

    ARRL Expands Initiative to Fire Up Collegiate Amateur Radio Clubs

    A growing number of campus radio clubs and student radio amateurs have begun to share ideas and suggestions on the ARRL Collegiate Amateur Radio Initiative (CARI) Facebook page, which is aimed at sparking renewed participation, activity, and idea-sharing among this special sector of the Amateur Radio community. The now-expanded initiative stemmed from two well-attended ARRL New England Division Convention forums for radio amateurs attending college, one hosted by the Amateur Radio clubs at Harvard (W1AF) and Yale (W1YU). As the forum explained, the activity level at campus Amateur Radio club stations can vary wildly from one year to the next, as students graduate and newcomers arrive.

    "The most common difficulty stems from uneven interest over time," said ARRL CEO Tom Gallagher, NY2RF, in his "Second Century" editorial, "Cheers for College Amateur Radio: Sis-boom-bah!" in the December 2016 issue of QST. "Even the strongest leaders in college Amateur Radio graduate every 4 years, sometimes leaving their clubs without adequate continuity or leadership succession."

    Gallagher pointed out that "recognized" student activities require students in order to maintain that status. However, even officially recognized college club stations may find themselves at the mercy of administrations in terms of space for a station and antennas, and some clubs have had to move more than once to accommodate their schools' space requirements. Issues involving safety and security can also affect college radio clubs.

    In a recent post, Kenny Hite, KE8CTL, a graduate teaching assistant at West Virginia University, said the university's Amateur Radio club, W8CUL, has been unable to participate in recent on-the-air events "due to lack of working equipment and questionable antenna setups," as he put it. Another poster, Dennis Silage, K3DS, who's associated with the Temple University Amateur Radio Club (K3TU), said, "A key to a successful and long-running college club seems to be faculty involvement for stability and recognition." He invited other CARI participants to check out the club's website.

    "It occurred to us that, if college Amateur Radio could galvanize [mutual interests], then colleges might just provide the ideal bridge between youthful interest in the subject and lifelong participation in our community," Gallagher wrote.

    FINAL WISHES FOR 2017

    Thanks another great year…for the nice comments, for the emails and for the stories of Amateur Radio. I know that 2017 will be even better.

    I hope you and you families have a great Holiday Season!

    73,

    John, KD8IDJ

    ****************************************************

    THE SECTION TRAFFIC MANAGER
    David Maynard, WA3EZN - STM



    First let’s start off with a correction.  Last month I listed the times and frequencies for several CW nets.  The Hit and Bounce slow net frequency was wrong. The Hit and Bounce slow net meets on 7.112 at 7:30 am local time.  Also the Hit and Bounce net meets on 7.112 at 8:30 am local time. Both nets meet on the same frequency an hour apart.

    Here is a list of Ohio NTS HF daily nets, frequencies, times and net managers.  All licensed hams are welcome to check in with or without radiogram traffic.



    BN(E)       Buckeye Net Early – CW –  WB8YLO NET MANAGER – 3580 at 6:45
    BN(L)       Buckeye Net Late  – CW –  WB9LBI NET MANAGER –   3590 at 10:00 pm
    OSN         Ohio Slow Net – CW –  W8OLO NET MANAGER –   3.53535 at 6PM
    OSSBN    Ohio Single Sideband Net – Phone – KC8WH NET MANAGER –
                            3972.5 at 10:30 AM, 4:15PM AND 6:45 PM

    If you not going anywhere on New Year’s here is something fun to try.  The ARRL Straight Key Night is coming up on January 1, 2016.  Why not dust off that old straight key and give it a try.  Who knows you may like it and have some fun.  Straight Key night starts at 0000Z and ends at 2359Z (UTC). More details can be found atwww.arrl.org/straight-key-night .

    Using CW Abbreviations and Q Signals Abbreviations are very commonly used in CW. They save time and are one reason why CW is so cool. Once you have learned some of the abbreviations as well as CW operating techniques, you are "in", you're a member of the CW using fraternity. Knowing and using CW correctly is kinda’ like belonging to an exclusive club. Anybody can pick up a microphone and talk on the ham bands; doing CW requires skill and finesse.

    Here I've listed some of the more common abbreviations and Q signals used on CW. There are more abbreviations available in many places, I will just mention a few of the most commonly used.
    ADR    address          GN    good night   RIG    station equipment
    AGN   again             GND ground         RPT    repeat
    BK      break             GUD good             SK      end of transmission
    BN      been                 HI     laugh           SRI    sorry
    C         yes                  HR    here             SSB    single side-band
    CL      closing             HV   have            TMW   tomorrow
    CUL   see you later    HW   how            TNX-TKS  thanks
    DE     from                    N    no               TU       thank you
    DX     distance           NR    number        UR      yours
    ES       and                 NW   now             VY      very
    FB      fine business   OM   old man       WX     weather
    GA     go ahead         PSE    please         XYL    wife
    GB     good bye         PWR  power         YL       young lady
    GE     good evening    R   received         73        best regards
    GM    good morning  RCVR receiver     88       love and kisses


    And the International "Q" signals, recognizable in any language:
    QRL    is frequency busy?    QRT   stop sending
    QRM   interference               QRX   wait, standby
    QRN    noise, static               QSB   fading
    QRO    increase power          QSL   acknowledge receipt
    QRP    decrease power          QSY   change frequency
    QRS    send slower                QTH   location

    I hope you have recovered from your Thanksgiving feast. However, not to spoil the mood but shortly after Thanksgiving comes Christmas.

    How are you doing on your Christmas shopping?  More important how are you doing on your Christmas hinting?  You know the hints you leave for other so they know what to get you for Christmas.  By the time you read this you will not have much time left before Christmas if it hasn’t already come and gone.  I think a review of my Christmas Hint list is in order.  Here is a list of places to leave that hint so your significant other will be sure to find it.

    I doubt that many of you will get them to buy you that $2000 HF rig but maybe a new mobile rig or a Heil headset with microphone or an ARRL membership with subscription to QST.  How are they going to know what you want if you don’t “hint” them?

    Here are a few suggestions where to leave him or her you hint so you get the ham radio items you want for Christmas.  You can use a page from a catalog or magazine to be:

    Taped to their car steering wheel.
    Taped on their cereal box or coffee cup
    Taped on the bathroom mirror
    Leave the store catalog on the coffee table open to the right page
    Clipped to the lamp on the night stand
    Taped to the door going to the garage or outside
    Put a hint in her underwear drawer.  Note: this doesn’t work for men
    Put one on his or her computer monitor
    Pin one to their pillow
    Talk about it every chance you get

    I am sure that if you think real hard you can come up with some good “HINT” places of your own. Good luck and I hope you get what you want for Christmas.

    How about the winter weather? Starting with lake effect snows from lake Michigan and Lake Erie? 

    I was raised in Pennsylvania about one mile south of Lake Erie so I know a little about lake effect.  Then there was the snow storm out west with a large amount of snow in some areas with road closures and many vehicle accidents. Here in Ohio we had some snow but not like the other areas have been hit.

    This is a good time to think about winter safety. It doesn’t matter if you are just heading out the door to work or taking that trip to grandma’s house for Christmas you should be thinking about car safety.  Here are some things you should do to prepare for that snow emergency.

    For the car or SUV check your tire conditions, battery, anti-freeze and check your lights. Also have window scrapers, shovel, cat litter, a working flashlight and clear your car lights of snow just to name a few items.  For personal safety you should have blankets, winter coats, boots, hats and gloves for everyone in case you get stuck and have to walk your way out. You should have food and water for everyone in the vehicle so if you can’t walk your way out you can at least wait comfortably for help to arrive. If you do get stuck and run you vehicle for heat make sure the exhaust pipe is open and clear and remains that way. It is also a good idea to keep your gas tank at least half full on a daily basis and to fill up before leaving on the ride to grandma’s house for Christmas.  After all we need you and yours to remain safe and have a happy holiday.

    Remember if you not going anywhere on New Year’s here is something fun to try.  The ARRL Straight Key Night is coming up on January 1, 2017.  Why not dust off that old straight key and give it a try.  Who knows you may like it and have some fun.  Straight Key night starts at 0000Z and ends at 2359Z (UTC). More details can be found atwww.arrl.org/straight-key-night.

    This 24-hour event is not a contest; rather it is a day dedicated to celebrating our CW heritage. Participants are encouraged to get on the air and simply make enjoyable, conversational CW QSOs. The use of straight keys or bugs to send CW is preferred. There are no points scored and all who participate are winners. Results from previous contests and events can be found athttp://www.arrl.org/files/file/ContestResults/2016/SKN_2016.pdf

    "We can't help everyone, but everyone can help someone"  Ronald Reagan

    To you and yours, have a Merry Christmas and a safe and happy New Year.

    For the latest Section Traffic Monthly Report go to:  http://arrl-ohio.org/stm/stm.html


    73, David, WA3EZN
    Ohio Section Traffic Manager

    ****************************************************

    FROM THE SCOUTING ASM
    Scott Hixon, KC8ITN

    As 2016 comes to a close, a lot of people want to reflect on the year and what they have done. At the end of the year, I like to look at the year ahead and think about how I can make it better than the previous.

    I’m not saying that you should just forget about what you have done throughout the year. It’s just that some people spend so much time looking back, they forget to look forward. Alexander Graham Bell said it best, “When one door closes another door opens; but we so often look so long and so regretfully upon the closed door, that we do not see the ones which open for us”.  It’s good to do an end of the year “debrief” to figure out what worked and what didn’t, but the best thing is to continually improve.

    One of the things I found that I can improve on at future events is to have more kid friendly flyers and brochures available. The ARRL used to have a tri-fold flyer called “Leap Into Ham Radio” that they put out back in the early 2000’s, but I think they have since discontinued it. When they came out, I ordered around 1000 of them to hand out during scout and youth events. A recent look on the ARRL website shows that they do have a “Ham Radio Youth” flyer that you can download or order from them. Another option is to be creative and make your own! By making your own, you can personalize it to fit your area, group or event.

    Another area I found that I can improve on is involving more ham operators. One of the worst situations to be in is to have a lot of scouts wanting to get on the radio and not having enough radios to put them on. Now, this doesn’t mean you should have one radio for each scout. But, you should have enough so that there are not long lines waiting to get on the radio. About the only line a scout is willing to spend a lot of time in is a food line! Showing amateur radio to a large group of scouts cannot be a one man show. Involve your friends, radio clubs and emergency communications groups. By involving other people to help they may, in turn, get others involved. That’s how we grow our hobby!

    So, as the New Year approaches, try to look ahead more than you look behind. There’s nothing we change about the past because it’s already happened. But, we CAN make the future better!

    Don’t forget about the “Scout Activity Contest” that I have mentioned throughout the year. There will be an individual and a group winner. The rules for the contest are simple: Keep track of all the hours you or your group put in showing scouts (Boy Scouts, Girl Scouts, Cub Scouts and Brownies) amateur radio during 2016. Turn in your results to me, and the individual and group with the most hours will win an award! The deadline to send me your results is January 15, 2017. You can email me your results at:kc8itn@arrl.net. Please put “Scout Contest” in the subject line of your email. I am planning on doing the same kind of contest for 2017 so now’s the time to start planning for next year.

    I would like to wish everyone in the Ohio Section a Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year. As you’re out and about during this season, drive carefully. My loved ones may be in the car next to yours.

    Remember to lift someone up that is feeling down, help your fellow man and lend an ear to someone who needs to talk. You may be that one person who can make a positive difference is another’s life.
    I will talk to you all next year!  Take care and make a difference in someone’s life!


    73,  Scott Hixon  KC8ITN
       
    ****************************************************

    OUT AND ABOUT
    Lyn Alfman, N8IMW - Assistant Section Manager

    I attended three amateur radio club meetings this month: The Zanesville Amateur Radio Club (ZARC-W8ZZV), the Cambridge Amateur Radio Association (CARA-W8VP), and the Amateur Radio Club of American Legion Post 641 Belle Valley (AA8AL). I also attended the Guernsey County Amateur Radio Emergency Service (GCARES).

    I attended the CARA officers’ meeting, two Cambridge Main Street Christmas Parade Committee meetings, and the Guernsey & Noble Counties Long Term Recovery Committee meeting, six amateur radio meals. I also helped provide lineup and communications for the Cambridge Christmas Parade. And, I will also be helping with the first annual Byesville Christmas Parade.

    The Cambridge Amateur Radio Association, W8VP, operated a Special Event Station on November 5 from the Waller-McMunn building celebrating the 175thanniversary of the Cambridge City Band-the oldest continuous community band in Ohio.  I had fun operating and logging.  Needless to say, we brought enough food that day to feed a group five times our size. Hams like to get together and eat and play radio!

    December will be a slow month for meetings because most of the amateur radio clubs locally do not have meetings.  CARA will have an Awards Banquet on December 10.

    Unfortunately, my e-mail was hacked on November 30, and they stripped the contacts out of my address book.  So, I have to rebuild the contacts in my address book.  So, if you normally get the CARA Communicator from me, and you did not receive it on December 1 and what it, please send me an email requesting the newsletter. 

    Thanks.  Remember to be “Radio Active”!


    ’73 Lyn, N8IMW  

    ****************************************************
    CENTRAL OHIO HAPPENINGS
    From: Fritz Tender, WD8E - Assistant Section Manager

    Good Morning All,

    Hebron had its first measurable snow fall reminding me why I dislike shovels.  This is my last article as Central Ohio Assistant Section Manager.  As such, I want to thank everyone who allowed me to have more fun than I deserved.  I am planning my hamfest itinerary and barring foul weather I look forward to seeing many of you very soon.

    73, Fritz, WD8E

    ****************************************************

    ARES TRAINING UPDATE
    Jim Yoder, W8ERW/5

    Many of us have now felt the chill of the winter season as we quickly approach the holidays and the beginning of a new year.  I am not sure that I am ready for it, but it has arrived here in Texas with some frost and below freezing temperatures.  Now this might not be nearly as harsh as it is for Ohioans but, I fear I have begun to acclimate to Texas weather.  As I walked outside this morning I decided that I was indeed cold.  The local media seems to be making a huge deal of what would be rather normal back in Ohio.  I am told that if it snows, not to even think about venturing out on the roads.  Good advice I am sure that is.  Driving here can be an adventure in good weather. 

    Ohio Section Hams have been busy all year working on and completing FEMA NIMS courses and other related training to support ARES.  The submissions to the ARES Training Database have been steady and continue to grow with over 500 Ohio Amateurs currently included in the training numbers which are now at over 3,300 classes recorded.  Over 300 have completed the FEMA core courses, ICS-100, 200, 700 and 800.  Many others have also documented additional FEMA training and the ARRL Emergency Communications courses EC-1,2 & 3.  This is an impressive amount of activity and a serious measure of the dedication and interest being given to the program by Ohio Section Hams.

    So now that the chill of winter is upon us and we all have those antenna projects completed for the year, there is time to grab a hot cup of coffee and knock out one or more of these informative FEMA NIMS courses.  I think you will find that they are not difficult and you will learn some interesting facts and procedures concerning how a disaster situation may be handled.  You will also learn how your Amateur Radio skills would be used and what to expect when it happens.  These courses are put together with input from all of the significant players including business, local responders and the Federal Agencies tasked to support communities when necessary.  The training is updated regularly to included lessons learned and the latest methods and technologies.

    Information on how to get started is available on the arrlohio.org website.  Your Emergency Coordinator is also a great resource as is your local EMA.  The courses are free and available online and don't take a lot of time to complete. 

    Let's all have a wonderful holiday season and be safe if you plan to travel.  I look forward to the onrush of training certificates that will be in my email soon after the new year.


    73 and thank you,

    Jim W8ERW

    ****************************************************

    LET'S TALK
    Scott Yonally, N8SY - Section Manager





    Hey Gang,

    OK, now just who left the freezer door open! Really? 2 degrees here in Lexington on December 15th? I guess I have to report that it’s winter outside now, even though on the calendar it says that we have another week to go. Oh well, I’m going to look on the bright side of things, at least the beer and pop are staying cold out in the garage now!!




    Did you read the segment above about the Christmas Special “Handbook Giveaway” drawing on the website yet? It’s there..!! AND.. I’m definitely sure that you’ll want to get in on this. Just go to the website and click on the big RED arrow on the left side.  Here’s a link: http://arrlohio.org 

    Be on the lookout for my annual End of the Year report coming very soon. I’ve got it almost completed and wow, we did a lot this year for sure. I know that you’ll find it very interesting for sure.

    The Amateur Radio Parity Act, H.R. 1301, has died. The bill stalled in the Senate due to the intervention of only one member, Sen. Bill Nelson (D-FL). Over the course of the past year, Sen. Nelson has received thousands of e-mails, letters, and phone calls from concerned constituents asking for his support of H.R. 1301. After numerous meetings were held with his senior staff in an effort to move the legislation forward, it became very clear that the Senator just didn’t want to have this legislation pass. So, we now have to start all over next year with the 115thCongress. So, with that in mind, I’m sure that there will be even more of a push for letter writing campaigns, and contacting your Legislators to get them on-board to pass this next year. I’m very sure that the Florida Senator has already gotten an ear full from the 44,000 plus Amateur Radio operators that reside there! Maybe the next time he won’t be quite so obstinate!

    Are you getting those emails from me? If not, all you have to do is to “Opt-In” to receive them. Heck, just send me an email   
    n8sy@n8sy.com   I’ll get you added to the mailing list. There’s a link to do this on the Ohio Section website, it’s on the bottom left corner. For your convenience. Here’s a direct link to it:  http://arrl-ohio.org/forwarder/forwarding.html  I urge all of you to make sure that everyone, regardless of whether they are a League member or not, gets signed up for one of these options. You can always “Opt-Out” at any time if you feel this is not what you were expecting. 

    Let’s talk about the Ohio Section website. You can find the Ohio Section Website at:http://arrl-ohio.org  If you don’t have this website set as your home page, I urge you to do so. It changes a lot and it’s so important for you to be kept up to date with the very latest information.

    On that same subject, there’s another NEW – one question – questionnaire on the Ohio Section Website! This question is really important for me to know. It will only take about 2 seconds for you to answer it, and you can see how your answer stacks up with others instantly. If you haven’t done it yet, please do. I really want to hear from you.


    Are you a member of the ARRL?? If you aren’t a League member, this is a great opportunity to become one. Want more information on how to join? Here’s the link:http://www.arrl.org/membership-levels. There’s even a 90 day FREE trial that you can apply for if you’ve never been a member.. Got questions about being a member or what the League is all about? Send me an email n8sy@n8sy.com   I’ll be happy to call or write to you. We can even meet and have coffee if you’d like, and I’ll buy!!

    I’m sure all of you have heard me say that I’m always available for you, whether you’re an ARRL member or not. It’s true, and you can feel free to write or call me anytime. If you have any questions, concerns, or would just like to sit and chat awhile over a cup of coffee or something cold to drink, feel free to call or write me  (419) 512-4445 or n8sy@n8sy.com   

    That’s going to do it for this month. I hope to see you all at your hamfests, club meetings or on the air!

    73, Scott, N8SY

    ****************************************************



    THE OFFICIAL OBSERVER COORDINATOR
    John Perone, W8RXX

    The hard working Ohio OO's monitored a total of 1149 hours in November.

    Only 1 OO card was sent.


    73, John, W8RXX

    ****************************************************

    WEBSITE STATS – ** arrl-ohio.org **

    November 2016

    Pages
    Hits
    Bandwidth
    42,738
    91,162
    2.30 GB

    ****************************************************

    SPECIAL EVENTS STATIONS IN OHIO

    01/28/2017 | 2nd Annual Cabin Fever Special Event
    Jan 28, 1700Z-2300Z, K8PRC
    Loudonville, OH.
    Pedestrian Amateur Radio Club.
    14.250 14.050 7.250 7.050
    QSL. K8PRC, 1661 Manor Ave NW
    Canton, OH 44708

    *********************************

    KIDS DAY

    The first Saturday in January is Kids Day. This is the time to get youngsters on the air to share in the joy and fun that Amateur Radio can provide. Kids Day gets under way on Saturday, January 7, at 1800 UTC and concludes at 2359 UTC. Sponsored by the Boring (Oregon) Amateur Radio Club, this event has a simple exchange, suitable for younger operators: First name, age, location, and favorite color. After that, the contact can be as long or as short as each participant prefers.

    Kids Day is the perfect opportunity to open your shack door and invite kids over to see what Amateur Radio has to offer. Details are on the ARRL website.

    ****************************************************

    OHIO HAMFEST CALENDAR
    01/15/2017 | Sunday Creek Amateur Radio Federation Hamfest
    Location: Nelsonville, OH
    Sponsor: Sunday Creek Amateur Radio Federation
    Website: 
    http://www.qrz.com/db/KC8AAV

    01/29/2017 | TUSCO Amateur Radio Club Hamfest
    Location: Strasburg, OH
    Sponsor: Tusco Amateur Radio Club
    Website: 
    http://tuscoarc.org
     
    ****************************************************

    A final – final..  Christmas is upon us. A time of joy, peace and love to ALL. Keep in your thoughts and prayers those who aren’t as fortunate as we are, and those who are serving to preserve our freedom.

    Janie and I do want to express our sincerest THANKS to YOU and YOURS for everything that you have done to make the Ohio Section great! May you all have a Very Merry Christmas and a Fantastic New Year!

    eof..






  8. In this issue:

    -> A FINAL PUSH

    -> THE TECHNICAL COORDINATOR

    -> AFFILIATED CLUB COORDINATOR REPORT

    -> NATIONAL PARKS ON THE AIR

    -> THE SECTION EMERGENCY COORDINATOR

    -> THE PUBLIC INFORMATION COORDINATOR

    -> THE SECTION TRAFFIC MANAGER

    -> THE STATE GOVERNMENT LIAISON

    -> FROM THE SCOUTING ASM

    -> OUT AND ABOUT

    -> CENTRAL OHIO HAPPENINGS

    -> CARBON MONOXIDE (CO) POISONING

    -> LET'S TALK

    -> THE OFFICIAL OBSERVER COORDINATOR

    -> WEBSITE STATS

    -> SPECIAL EVENT STATIONS IN OHIO

    -> OHIO HAMFEST CALENDAR

    ****************************************************

    A FINAL PUSH

    I am writing to you today because we are nearing the end of the 114th Congress and the efforts to obtain passage of The Amateur Radio Parity Act are at a critical juncture. With a few short weeks left to the year, we must get this bill passed NOW or we will need to start all over again come January 1, 2017.

    As you know, thanks to your previous efforts, the legislative efforts scored a major victory in our campaign when the Amateur Radio Parity Act, H.R. 1301, passed in the House of Representatives on September 12th. The legislation is now in the Senate in two forms – as H.R. 1301 and alternately in the packaged bill S. 253.  We still need every Senator to approve the bill.

    You are one of over 730,000 licensed Amateur Radio Operators living in the United States.  Many of you already live in deed-restricted communities, and that number grows daily.

    We asked you for your help in September - and you responded in great numbers.  We collected over 63,000 emails that were distributed to every single U.S. Senator.  That is amazing. However, with the election hiatus over, each and every Senator must be reminded that their business is not complete until this important legislation affecting hams is passed and sent to the President.

    Even if you wrote in the past, we need you to write again!

    ONCE AGAIN I REMIND YOU THAT NOW IS THE TIME FOR ALL HAMS TO GET INVOLVED IN THE PROCESS!

    If you want to have effective outdoor antennas but are not currently allowed to do so by your Home Owner’s Association, PLEASE SEND THESE EMAILS TODAY! 

    If you don’t live in a deed-restricted community but you care about the future of Amateur Radio, please support your avocation and your fellow hams and SEND THESE EMAILS TODAY!

    We need you to reach out one more time to your Senators TODAY!  Right away Right now!

    Help us in the effort.  Please go to this linked website and follow the prompts:


    Thank you.

    73,
    Rick Roderick, K5UR

    ****************************************************

    THE TECHNICAL COORDINATOR
    Jeff Kopcak – TC

    Hey gang,

    It’s been a rater busy month.  End of the year projects and planning are in full swing.  I ran the electronic voting for the LEARA Trustee elections.  Voting ended in a never-before-seen tie between two candidates.  It was a great slate of candidates and noted in the results because the race was close.  There was a clear #1 and #2 winner.  The #3 spot was a tie.  All three candidates received more than 50% of the total vote.  At the Trustees meeting, we sat the two winners then had a run-off vote among the Trustees.  Since there were 10 Trustees, the run-off vote could end in a tie so a coin flip may have been the deciding factor.  However, the run-off vote did not end in a tie and the 3rd person was seated.

    Been planning and getting the end-of-year door prize ready for our Holiday Dinner meeting.  Traditionally our club has given away a radio as a door prize at this meeting.  For the past two years we’ve given away Baofeng radios.  With the findings in the November 2015 issue of QST and similar tests run by other individuals (Dave KD8TWG being one) I encouraged the group to consider better alternatives.  We settled on a Yaesu FT-60 HT holiday door prize.

    Just this past weekend (10/12), Bill K8SGX with help from KD8TWG (both Technical Specialists) and myself made significant forward progress on installing LEARA’s Fusion Repeater.  That project has taken a lot longer than I would like but hit significant road blocks in the original plan.  Even installing the repeater at the site caused problems because the handles on the DR1X wouldn’t allow the cabinet to close.  *Sigh.*  Had to take out the unit, the 16 some screws for the top cover, remove the screws for the handles, and put it all back together.  I think one more trip is required to drill some holes and install some jumper cables.  Then, finally, it will be on the air *knock on wood.*

    If that wasn’t enough, I participated in a DXpedition the weekend of October 22nd.  Bob K8MD, Technical Specialist, wrote up an article.

    ---
    K8JTK, WA8LIV, and myself: K8MD completed a “DXpedition” to South Bass Island to activate

    Perry’s International Victory and Peace Memorial (NM20) for National Parks on the Air. After an arduous boat ride (wind and waves were high!) we landed on the island around 1045. We started setting up the HF station on Saturday at approximately 1130. We operated for approximately 2 hours on 40m. Operating was great! Once we got spotted, we were frequently piled up. We were averaging over 100 contacts per hour. While the day was relatively sunny, cooler temps and a brisk wind coming off the lake kept us bundled up. The National Park Service was extremely welcoming and hospitable. They offered us tables and chairs, which we declined due to bringing our own. They permitted us to operate on the “back porch” of the museum. So the wind was mostly breaking by the building, which was definitely appreciated by us! As long as we kept in the sun, we were comfortable.

    The contacts rate never really slowed down much, but it was getting near the time they close the observation deck for the day. So we left the HF setup to head up to the observation deck at 317’ to try a few VHF/UHF contacts on 146.52 (didn’t have SSB capability). We made 7 contacts on FM and zero contacts on DMR. Zero contacts on DMR surprised us, as we had advertised the activation on social media and received responses that people would be out looking for us. We got on the DMR repeaters on the Ohio Talkgroup to try and set up simplex skeds. Even the repeaters were quiet. After coming back down from the observation deck, we operated HF for another 40 minutes until the park closed. At which point we packed up and got dinner. When the day was over, we made approximately 240 contacts on HF and 7 contacts on 146.52.

    We returned to the park on Sunday and operated for an additional 3 hours. From approximately 1200 to 1500. The weather on Sunday was a significant improvement to Saturday afternoon. Sunny skies, calm winds, and temperature around 65. Operating during these three hours however, proved to be more of a duress then the previous day. Both operating and logging proved more difficult due to the lingering effects of the festive activities from the previous evening. When visiting foreign lands, I think it’s important to assimilate into the local culture. We found ourselves in a bar that was both red and round, consuming a strange carbonated gold colored drink, that was dispensed from a tap. Thinking this was just an unusual tasting local water, we consumed a great deal. We wanted to make sure we were properly hydrated and also remain assimilated with the natives.  This was Halloween weekend on Put-In-Bay, and everyone was dressed up in costumes.  The costumes were quite amazing!  Despite the self-imposed adverse conditions from our Saturday night activities, we were able to log an additional 100 contacts on Sunday, including DX: Croatia, France, Belgium, Mexico, and Canada.  Again the National Park Staff was very warm and welcoming to us.  This was the last day the monument and museum would be open this year.  The park staff gave us free candy and free popcorn balls at no charge due to the expiration date happening before they reopen in Spring.

    A few different antennas were utilized, as well as a few different methods to get the antennas off the ground. I learned that 40m and 80m dipoles fed with LMR-400 is a lot of weight for my Jackite pole. I need to cut a piece of RG-8X that’s the exact length to get to the base. Then use a connector to connect feed line to get back to the operating position. That should lighten the load on the mast. Despite being stressed, the Jackite pole performed excellent. So much easier to cart around then the military masts I had been using previously!

    I fabricated an aluminum ground spike for the Jackite pole. Not a good idea: the aluminum ground spike bent under the weight. I guess aluminum was too soft. The point of the ground spike was to hold up the mast while I set the guy wires when operating by myself. We had three people, so it was easy enough for one person to hold up the mast, while the other two set up guy wires. I’m glad I tried the spike for the first time when I had other people around to help me, rather than trying the spike when I was by myself! My portable dipole is a 40m / 80m crossed dipole. The dipole legs are resonant ¼ wavelength and also act as the guys for the mast. Perhaps I need to try a 40m vertical on the Jackite pole next? A single antenna wire might be more suited to the light weight jackite pole. We used the mast and dipoles on Saturday. Then we used LNR end fedz on Sunday. We used a slingshot / fishing reel to put the end fed into trees. The 40m end fed was up an impressive height. The single band end feds into trees was definitely more simple to set up then setting up the mast and dipoles, and I believe the end fed was just as effective. Both Saturday and Sunday a 20m LNR End Fed was set up vertically in one tree. Since it’s a half wave with match box, it does not require any ground radials. It performed very well with 59 reports into California and Oregon. It’s this antenna where we worked DX stations in Belgium, France, and Croatia.

    A fun time was had by all, and we all look forward to similar opportunities in the future.
    Bob Mueller, K8MD

    ---
    This was a phenomenal experience for me as I’ve never done anything close to a DXpedition.  Huge thanks to Bob – K8MD as he did much of the planning and most of the equipment used was his.  Andrew brought his go box setup for the contacts on Perry’s Monument.  We made a total of 350 contacts.  Bob worked out the numbers for NM20.  We made 3x the average number of contacts for all previous activations.  Our contacts accounted for about ¼ of the total number of Q’s through our activation.  Thanks to the National Parks Service for their gracious hospitality and putting up with us slinging wires and running coax around the park.

    “All your lightbulbs are belong to us”
    A pun on the ‘90s meme “All your base are belong to us” has been used to describe what happened to the Internet on October 21.  There as a massive DDoS attack on one of the companies that provides core services to the Internet.  Dyn, formally DynDNS, was the target of this attack.  They were known for providing the previously free, now paid, service of allowing automatic updating of DNS records without manual intervention.  It was used by tech savvy people to access devices on their home network.  I used this service when I ran my website on a server in my house.  The Dynamic DNS service would update my URL when the IP address of the DSL modem changed.  The company has rebranded to “Dyn” and shifted their focus to more commercial infrastructure products such as domain registration and email services.

    Dyn provides DNS services to some of the largest companies on the internet: Twitter (social media), Reddit (social news aggregation), GitHub (code repository), Amazon (shopping), Netflix (movies), Spotify (music), Runescape (game), and its own website.

    DDoS (Distributed Denial of Service) happens when criminals use a large number of hacked, ill-configured, or poorly secured systems to flood a target site with so much junk traffic that it can no longer serve legitimate visitors.

    DNS refers to Domain Name System services. DNS is an essential component of the Internet.  It’s responsible for translating human-friendly website names like http://arrl-ohio.org/into numeric, machine-readable Internet addresses (74.220.207.99). Anytime you send an e-mail or browse the web, your machine is sending a DNS look-up request to your Internet service provider (ISP) to help route the traffic.

    A DDoS attack effectively makes a site or service disappear from the Internet.  Users cannot access the site because it is busy handling (what it believes to be) legitimate traffic but in reality, is junk.

    With more and more multi-megabit connections into our homes and more consumer devices on the Internet, the amount of junk traffic generated in recent attacks has been some of the largest seen on the Internet.  The availability of tools for compromising and leveraging the collective firepower of Internet of Things devices (IoT) has made these large-scale types of attacks possible.  IoT being Internet-based security cameras, digital video recorders, baby monitors, lightbulbs, refrigerators, toasters, and Internet routers - to name a very few.  Many of these devices are unpatched, not updated, poorly secured, and essentially unfixable.  They’re rushed to market, made as cheaply as possible (which lends little credence to security), and not supported due to lack of resources or the company went out of business.  On the flipside, it’s also applicable that users don’t know they need to secure their devices.

    Criminals need to build and maintain a large robot network of these devices (known as a ‘botnet’) which is time intensive, risky, and a very technical endeavor.  Botnet owners make their services available to anyone willing to pay a couple bucks for a subscription.  With a few commands, they can leverage all devices under their control to attack a target.  In general, with very few exceptions, owners of compromised devices have no idea their device is part of a botnet.

    DDoS attacks are typically: retaliatory in nature - criminals get offended or upset at some comment, story, or statement and, in response, knock their service offline.  Attempts at extortion - flood a service with so much traffic it’s unavailable to legitimate users and demand a ransom to stop the attack.  Diversion - ‘hey look at this massive attack while we secretly do something else over here.’

    It is believed the attack on Dyn was retaliatory in nature using compromised digital video recorders (DVRs) by XiongMai Technologies. The components that XiongMai makes are sold downstream to vendors who then use it in their own products.


    A DDoS can happen to anyone or anything connected to the Internet.
    I bring up this attack because our Section Manager Scott mentioned it in one of his mailings and I was discussing it with Bob – K8MD on our DXpedition.  Bob indicated he was seeing a lot of posts online how something similar could disrupt ham radio digital modes and hams must stick to analog only modes.  His response was: a digital repeater will still function without the Internet, which is true.  D-STAR, DMR, Fusion, and probably any other up-and-coming mode repeaters will still continue to operate without an Internet link.  Additionally, all of these modes will operate simplex without a repeater and without infrastructure.  The Internet is for linking or sending your message to another endpoint.  Then you have resources like PSK31 or Olivia that do not have any Internet infrastructure component.  Digital modes, in particular on the HF bands, can reach out further than analog modes.

    I think it would be possible to make a backup IP link over another transport (like Mesh) for those modes or use AllStar - which is great for linking over non-Internet based networks.  To go even further with the dooms-day scenario: if anyone else can get access to your resources, they have the potential to disturb them.  Analog repeaters too can be jammed, brought offline with a power outage, or sabotaged by a determined actor.

    How can we fix DDoS attacks?  We can’t.  The Internet and the protocols in use today are not much different than originally designed.  The protocols were not designed to handle this type of abuse.  Strides are being made by ISPs so secure their networks as best they can.  There is even dissent between providers as to what steps should be taken.  Another suggestion is to create some kind of IP security association with published standards, auditing, and a certification process similar to an Underwriters Laboratory “UL” sticker on a product.  Another (less likely) is to hold companies financially responsible for attacks using their devices.  Less likely to happen because it could put legitimate companies out of business quickly and would not hold fly-by-night companies responsible.  Until then, these devices will remain a danger to others until they are completely unplugged from the Internet.  That’s not going to happen.  We like our stuff.

    That's about it for this month. 

    Coverage of the DDoS and resources used for my write-up:

    Map is of the outages caused by the attack.


    Thanks for reading and 73… de Jeff – K8JTK

    ****************************************************

    THE AFFILIATED CLUBS COORDINATOR
    John Myers, KD8MQ - ACC

    Hi everyone,

    Hi everyone, How are you enjoying this beautiful fall weather? Hopefully, it’ll hold out till at least Thanksgiving! There’s always a lot to be thankful for here at the home QTH. One thing is that the number of Ohio Amateur Radio clubs just keeps growing. A year ago, we had 99 affiliated clubs in the Ohio section. 20 of them were Special Service Clubs. Now, let’s fast forward a year. As of November 13th, we have 108 clubs, and 27 of them are Special Service Clubs. That is awesome!

    I’m still tossing ideas around for December, but In January’s column, I’m going to re-visit the advantages of ARRL affiliation, and why your club should become a Special Service Club. Remember, most clubs are already qualified for Special Service Status. The only thing missing is the paperwork. And, since I mentioned paperwork, since a lot of clubs hold elections at this time of year please don’t forget to update your clubs contact info at www.ARRL.org
      
    So, let’s talk about Field Day. This is one of the biggest club activities that I know of. The results are out; let’s have a look. First of all, you can find the results at

    Overall, there were 2,696 stations listed in the results. That’s down a bit from last year’s number of  2,719. Now, let’s filter out all but Ohio section entries. Congratulations this year goes to Delaware ARA, the overall top scorer in the section. Second place went to the Portage County ARS. There’s a lot more info to be found in the results database, so I invite you to pour a cup of coffee, and spend some time with the results. The next Summer Field Day is only about 7 months away, so time to begin making plans. Your competitors are.

    I said Summer Field Day, because I wanted a lead-in to Winter Field Day (WFD). WFD occurs on the final weekend of January and is under the management of the Winter Field Day Association. Complete information can be found at http://www.winterfieldday.com/.

    I know that operating in January in the outdoors isn’t many peoples cup of tea. But, you don’t have to operate outdoors to have fun in this one. Operate from your club shack, or the shack of one of your members. Or, consider renting a cabin at one of your local City, or State parks. In other words, you don’t have to operate outside to have fun! However you choose to do it, it’s a cool way to get your members together outside of meeting night. Let’s not forget your new Hams, either. Operating HF under the guidance of an Elmer might motivate them to upgrade.

    With that, I’m going to tie the ribbons on it. I’d like to wish everyone a wonderful Thanksgiving, and maybe will hear you on the air this weekend in the ARRL Sweepstakes.


    73, until next month.

    DE KD8MQ

    ****************************************************

    NATIONAL PARKS ON THE AIR
    John Myers, KD8MQ - ACC

    Hi NPOTA Peeps, It’s another month, but not winding down at all. The group goal is to wind up this year with 1 Million QSOs. Can we do it? Yes, we can. There’s been some increased activities on the bands and it looks like activity will continue to run strong until the end of the year. Don’t expect a lot of activity on Thanksgiving, or Christmas Days, though.

    Mary, N0TRK has been tracking the numbers on a daily basis, and posted the following report to the NPOTA group on Sunday, November 13th:

    Okay.. as of about 8:00 am CST we had made 839,669 Contacts for NPOTA (per the NPOTA Stats page)! That leaves us a mere 160,331 to go!

    To make that 1 Million QSOs we need to have 23,879 per week and in the last 7 days we made 24,586 - Our daily average for the last 7 days is 3512 and we need to average 3472 per day- Keep up the good work!

    So, there you have it. What can you do to help? Simple, get on and operate, work those activations. Even if it isn’t a new park in your log, you may be a new contact for some activator. Better yet, get out and activate. Here in Ohio, we are fortunate to have so many National Park units within easy driving distance.

    I’d like to give a tip of the hat to all the activators. Here in Ohio, Eric, WD8RIF continues to dominate the top of the Activator Leader Board. Dennis, AI8P is closing the gap, though, followed by Mark, WN8U, and Jeff, KE8BKP. I’d like to single out Jeff, though. He is not only a Activator, but a chaser as well, and has now entered the 400 club. Very Impressive, Jeff!

    So, it's November, and it's cold, so I may as well forget about activating for the rest of the year, right? Not at all! Don't tell that to Bob, K8MD, who recently made yet another trip to NM20, Perry's monument.  Or, to members of the Alliance ARC who will be at First Ladies Library (NS16) this weekend.

    So make your plans to get out there, and activate. This is an event which won't be repeated in our lifetimes, so let's make the best of it.

    With that, I'll say 73 for this month. Happy Thanksgiving to all


    73,
    John, KD8MQ

    ****************************************************

    THE SECTION EMERGENCY COORDINATOR
    Stan Broadway, N8BHL


    What’s Important

    You know, I may sound like a broken record to some of you.  And the reality is, most of you will actually know what that means! 

    You can be proud of all that Ohio ARES has accomplished. I say “You” because you are the ones doing it! We met the challenge in July (hope you read the CQ article in October!) with flying colors. Those events, and the more regular events such as the marathons, rides, and even the smaller level emergency responses we do over the course of a year all go together to keep amateur radio as a viable communications resource…just the way we advertise.  

    I assume you have all heard me admonish that this is a very important season of the year for us- with most of the activities done, it’s time to get to some very serious training. We can’t shoot from the hip any more. We MUST be familiar with NIMS and ICS, we MUST be in a first-name relationship with our EMA and Red Cross directors. We MUST constantly work at presenting ourselves professionally.  One good idea we’ve been talking over is the possibility of something like a golf/polo shirt that would help identify us and help us look more professional.  Not in writing yet, but it sounds good on the surface.  And there’s the constant effort to keep up with technology. Do you buy that new DMR radio? Or do you branch out with a newer digital HF rig?

    I am all of that, of course.  But you might be surprised to hear me say just as forcefully, “That’s not the most important thing.”   And in order to keep our entire life in proper perspective, one prime directive applies:  Keep the most important thing, the most important thing.  Without reservation I tell you that amateur radio is not the most important thing.  The old adage, “God, Family, Work, Hobbies” pretty much sums it up. You can apply that however you like, but if you haven’t yet achieved that grand status of being retired or if you’re on a second career you are completely guiltless if you have to miss an event or two. If you have a family gathering it towers over anything we do.  I recently had to miss a local event because we had scheduled a photo session with all the kids and grandkids. Didn’t bat an eye. My wife KE8BKR is ~very~ understanding; she married into the volunteer and professional firefighting lifestyle (holidays? What’s that?) She is also very forgiving during those, “I’ll call- not sure when it’s going to be over” events.  But she’s number one. You who have lost your spouse understand that looking back, right? We have lost several really big figures in ARES this year- people who have devoted themselves to all that we do.  I recently attended a memorial for a retired Delaware County EC, who retired because his ailing wife needed his full attention. Good call – a much more important thing. Their last years together were sweetened because he kept his priorities.

    Look, ARES is not much different from any volunteer organization. The 80/20 rule applies.  80% of the work is done by 20% of the people. I’m preaching at the 20%. I love you for all you do, and don’t give up! But keep the important stuff at the top of the list.

    As for the 80%. Let’s try a different approach.

    Plainly stated- if you’re going to commit to be a part of ARES, then for Pete’s sake be a part of it!!  You must be aware that in order to participate you will need to devote some time to train, some time to serve your community, and yes, some (OK- lots!) of money to be ready for “The Big One.”  The volunteer fire service has a question, “What if they had a fire and nobody showed up?”  Pretty glum results, right?  In some cases, we’re going to ask you to put more time into the program- be a part of ARESMAT, or do something above and beyond. If you want to carry the card, you should be ready to do the work…it’s that simple. EC’s shouldn’t have to pull their (remaining) hair out trying to get members to respond.  My advice to you is figure out ahead of time how much time you have, and how much you can devote.  But even with this call to action, the prime directive still applies.


    For the latest Section Emergency Coordinator’s monthly report go to: http://arrl-ohio.org/SEC/notes.html


    73, Stan, N8BHL

    ****************************************************

    THE PUBLIC INFORMATION COORDINATOR
    John Ross, KD8IDJ

    Historic Award – Historic Venue
    The Voice of America Museum, just outside of Cincinnati,  served as the perfect backdrop on Saturday November 12th for the presentation of the Hiram Percy Maxim award to Ohio’s Chris Brault KD8YUJ.

    The national ARRL award is presented to a young amateur radio operator who exemplifies the many great attributes of amateur radio.

    I got the chance to talk to Chis and at 13 years old he’s a lot smarter that I was at his age. He’s a very nice young man. I asked him about his plans for college but he’s pretty focused right now on getting to High School!
    Chris got a chance to work some 40 meter contacts after the ceremony and his first contact was…W1AW!! He’s real pro on the air and if you get chance listen for his CQ. We certainly need more young amateur enthusiasts like Chris and I can’t think of a better example. Congratulations Chris!

    By the way, if you ever get a chance, check out the Voice of America Museum in West Chester. It’s the site of the former Bethany Relay Station for the VOA and it’s full of historic equipment and memories!

    They are open once a month for tours and I guarantee you’ll want your basement to look just like the inside of this mega transmission facility. The West Chester Amateur Radio Association also as their club shack at the VOA Museum.

    Amateur Radio on TV
    Amateur Radio is showing up again on a network television show appropriately called FREQUENCY!
    The show is about a police detective that solves her cases by talking to her deceased father on amateur radio…although they call it “the ham”!

    They play pretty fast and loose with the operating procedures and, apparently, it’s all duplex as they wander around the room talking without a push-to-talk switch in sight. There’s plenty of vintage amateur radio equipment on the screen but the microphones look like they were bought a couple of years ago.

    While I appreciate seeing “the ham” on TV I just wish they would consult a real amateur for some real world advice…or advice from whatever world they are portraying. I think we could help.

    Tim Allen’s show, Last Man Standing is doing a pretty good job with presenting amateur radio correctly. There are lots of camera shots with Tim’s Ham Shacks (he has two) in the background. Occasionally Tim will get on the air, he actually holds a valid license, but sometimes his daughter will take to the air without any ID or license. However, she does us the push-to-talk switch!!!!

    There are over 1000 cable and satellite channels now. There should be room for all Amateur Radio network. I’ll work on that let you know!

    Cloud Cover
    If you store your ham radio computer data on a “CLOUD” you could be in for some stormy weather. Last month my CLOUD got lost…along with all of the files. After a few days of panic…it was found and restored. However, before I could make the changes for a local storage the second storm hit…Windows 10 is now locked up with very little hope of retrieving what I have stored on my computer’s hard drive.

    I’m the not the only this is affecting so just plan accordingly if you have a lot of stuff you don’t what to lose. Stand along hard drives are less expensive than recreating the last six years of your life in data!!! And, yes, if you missed my column last month…this why. I owe you another column and I guarantee if won’t get lost or rained on!!

    2017 Newsletter Contest
    Just about two months left before the 2017 Newsletter Contest gets underway… and I can’t wait.

    Remember you need to submit two newsletters of your choice to be entered or you can do what a lot of folks do… send them every month. I read them all and thanks, in advance, for making me the most intelligent ham radio guy on the planet!!

    I bought the judges dinner last week and they are ready go for another year.

    Good Luck! You guys are the best when it comes to promoting our great hobby.


    That's  all for this month...73

    John, KD8IDJ
    Public Information Coordinator

    ****************************************************

    THE SECTION TRAFFIC MANAGER
    David Maynard, WA3EZN - STM

    These are the Ohio NTS HF daily nets, frequencies, times and net managers.  All licensed hams are welcome to check in with or without radiogram traffic.

    BN(E)             Buckeye Net Early – CW –  WB8YLO NET MANAGER – 3580 at 6:45 PM

    BN(L)             Buckeye Net Late  – CW –  WB9LBI NET MANAGER –   3590 at 10:00 PM

    OSN                Ohio Slow Net        – CW –  W8OLO NET MANAGER –   3.53535 at 6 PM

    OSSBN           Ohio Single Sideband Net – Phone – KC8WH NET MANAGER –
                            3972.5 at 10:30 AM, 4:15 PM AND 6:45 PM

    Last month I introduced you to CW with my article Why Morse Code? I will continue with this theme for this month.  I you missed the information from last month it provided these links to use for learning Morse code.  Remember that you are not going to count dot and dashes a 5 WPM but you are going to want to start at a higher speed and learn the sounds.




    K6RAU Code Course
    MORSE CODE COURSES:





    If you start now you can be ready for Straight Key Night in January.  You could also be ready for that next CW DX contest. Check back next month for more information.

    Depending on how far along you are, you may need code to copy to use to increase your speed and confidence.  W1AW has code practice assessable via the internet at this link:

    Listed at this link are W1AW code practice transmissions for the dates and speeds indicated. The files are in MP3 format, playable using Windows Media Player, RealPlayer or your favorite MP3 player.  The files are updated every other week.

    W1AW also has on air code transmissions. You will find this information at this link:

    Frequencies are 1.8025, 3.5815, 7.0475, 14.0475, 18.0975, 21.0675, 28.0675 and 147.555 MHz.

    Slow Code = practice sent at 5, 7-1/2, 10, 13 and 15 words per minute (wpm).

    Fast Code = practice sent at 35, 30, 25, 20, 15, 13 and 10 wpm.

    Code practice textis from the pages of QSTmagazine. The source is given at the beginning of each practice session and alternate speeds within each session. For example, "Text is from November 2010 QST, pages 9 and 81," indicates that the practice session's plain text is from the article on page 9 and its mixed number/letter groups are from page 81.

    Daily Morse Code Practice QST Source

    Eastern time zone code transmissions are at 9 AM (1300 UTC), 4 PM (2000 UTC), 7 PM (2300 UTC) and 10 PM (0200 UTC) Tuesday through Friday and alternate between slow speed one day and fast code next.   Code bulletins are also sent but at 18 wpm only.  You can check this out athttp://www.arrl.org/w1aw-operating-schedule
    If you would like to try a slow speed traffic net here is what the preamble for the Ohio Slow Speed Net is like. (3.53535 at 6 PM)
    THE OHIO SLOW NET PREAMBLE

    CQ OSN CQ OSN THE OHIO SLOW NET PART OF NTS OHIO SECTION ALL ARE WELCOME
    OSN QNZ PSE VVV VVV QND QNN KC8UR TONY
    OSN QTC?,QNA BNTX VOL?
    OSN QNI...

    There are other slow nets that you may want to check out.  These are from lists on the internet so I cannot guarantee their accuracy.
    Hit and Bounce Slow Net       3.576              7:30 AM         Daily
    Empire Slow Speed                3.576               6:00 PM          Daily
    Maryland CW Slow Net         3.563               7:30 PM          Daily
    Indiana Slow Net                    3.535               7:00 PM          Daily
    PA CW Training Net              3.537               6:30 PM          Daily

    Moving on now is the time to start thinking what Ham radio items you want for Christmas.  Its time to collect catalogs and clipping of the new HF rig you want someone to buy for you.

    Until next time remember without training you are not a part of the solution, you are part of the problem.

    Have a happy and pleasant Thanksgiving


    For the latest Section Traffic Monthly Report go to:  http://arrl-ohio.org/stm/stm.html


    73, David, WA3EZN
    Ohio Section Traffic Manager

    ****************************************************

    THE STATE GOVERNMENT LIAISON

    Bob Winston, W2THU


    MESSAGE FROM YOUR SGL
    I want to thank Scott for appointing me your State Government Liaison (SGL) for our Ohio Section. As they say, I have some big shoes to fill because our outgoing SGL, Nick Pittner, K8NAP did so much for Ohio hams when he spearheaded passage of the Ohio PRB-1. Further, Nick wrote the pamphlet Ohio’s Amateur Radio Antenna Law, which is distributed throughout the state at hamfests and other amateur radio gatherings. You can also find it on our Ohio Section website

    So, what are my duties? The League requires that I collect and promulgate information on state legislation and regulation affecting amateur radio with the goal of making sure that these laws work to the mutual benefit of society and the amateur radio service. I will be working with you both individually and through your clubs as I report to Scott and the League.

    Therefore, I will need your assistance in alerting me as to any proposed legislation that you feel might affect our hobby. For example, over the years hams who monitor their local government legislative bodies have alerted me to proposed ordinances concerning cell phone towers that were overly broad and could have impacted ham towers. Another example is a suburban city that elected to ban cell phone usage while driving unless it was hands free. Such a law, if written too broadly, could prevent you from operating your mobile rig.

    There is a whole list of key words to watch for if you are a government watchdog such as: antenna, mobile radio, scanners, antenna radiation, biological effects of radio signals, radio interference, headphones in automobiles, etc. If you are aware of any proposed legislation in your township, village, city, county or our state government, please let me know so that I may carry out my duties and help all amateurs in Ohio to enjoy our great hobby.

    The preferred way to reach me is via email,w2thu@arrl.net


    73, Bob  W2THU

    ****************************************************

    FROM THE SCOUTING ASM
    Scott Hixon, KC8ITN

    A few weekends ago (Oct. 28-30) I had the privilege of attending the Simon Kenton Council, Ohio Valley District Fall Camporee not only as a Scout Master with my troop, but also as a ham radio operator. The camporee was held at Mount Oval, just outside of Circleville, Ohio.  Phil Freeman, who was heading up the camporee, asked me to set up a ham radio and teach the scouts that attended a little about amateur radio and also to go over some of the requirements for the Radio Merit Badge. Needless to say, they didn’t have to ask me twice!

    As the sun came up Saturday morning, the entire camp (about 80 in all) met for the flag raising. There is something about watching the American Flag going up the flagpole against the back drop of a rising sun that definitely puts a lump in your throat! After the flag was up and announcements were made, it was time to get the ham station set up. As I’ve told you in the past, setting up a station for a group of scouts doesn’t have to be complicated. As you can see in the picture, mine was just a simple setup.

    The first part of the morning consisted of a couple timed events. The event I did was giving each group a copy of the morse code characters and after they looked at it, each scout in the group had to send their name in morse code. When the group was finished, I took their overall time and got an average time for the group. The group with the quickest average time won. Even though they didn’t know morse code, each scout had their hand on a key and they all did pretty well.

    After the timed events were over, it was time for the merit badge part of the camporee. At my area, I had a good size group of scouts doing the Radio Merit Badge. The scouts were really impressed as we tuned thru the bands and they were able to hear people from other countries. When we would find a morse code signal, they would listen for a character then look it up to see what the letter was. I had a great time talking with the scouts and working with them on the merit badge.  Sometimes with scouts it can be like trying to herd cats, but there is no funnier group to be with!


    With a limited amount of time before lunch (did I mention that scouts LOVE meal times?) and other activities, we weren’t planning on the scouts being able to walk away with merit badges. But the scouts did get a lot of the requirements done. One of the things I did was to do the requirements that involved ham radio. That way they could work on the rest of the requirements at home and once they have all the requirements completed the can contact me or another Radio Merit Badge councilor to sign off that they completed it.

    It is interesting to note that as the boys were coming around to my station, so were the adult leaders. Quite a few adults were asking a lot of questions and showed a lot of interest in becoming hams. So by setting up at a scout event, I was able to plant the seed of amateur radio in the young and old alike!  And all it took was a couple hours of my time.

    Remember, it’s not difficult to show off our wonderful hobby. The main thing is to not over-think it. Keep it simple and not very technical. Though we have been in the hobby for many years and know all the jargon and model numbers and manufacturers, those outside of the hobby don’t. The simpler you make it, the better they will understand and remember. So get out there, set up a radio at a scout meeting or a scout campout and have fun! Setting at a radio table with a cup of coffee as you watch the sun rise is one of the best memories you will have!

    And for all the hams that have helped out the scouting program and those that plan to help the next generation of scouts, WE SALUTE YOU!!

    Take care and make a difference in someone’s life!


    73,  Scott Hixon  KC8ITN
       
    ****************************************************

    OUT AND ABOUT

    Lyn Alfman, N8IMW - Assistant Section Manager

    I attended three amateur radio club meetings this month: Cambridge Amateur Radio Association (CARA-W8VP), Zanesville Amateur Radio Club (ZARC-W8ZZV), and Muskingum Valley Council (Boy Scout Leaders) Radio Club (MVCRC-W8MVC) meetings. This was the first annual meeting for W8MVC, which was led by its call sign trustee Matt Murphy, KC8BEW.  They held elections, discussed voting and non-voting memberships, dues, how often they will meet, whether or not to have a web site and/or Facebook presence, when the next meeting will occur and where.

    I also attended the Guernsey County Amateur Radio Emergency Service (GCARES) meeting and participated as a GCARES member in the Simulated Emergency Test drill from home.  I, along with seven other ARES members from Guernsey and Muskingum Counties, took part in the Muskingum County Health Department’s Drive Thru Flu Clinic at the Muskingum County Fairgrounds, which lasted eleven hours.

    I travelled to the Muskingum Valley Scout Reservation in Coshocton County on October 15 for Jamboree on the Air (JOTA) to help provide information and demonstrations of amateur radio capabilities to any of the hundreds of Cub Scouts in camp that day. Of the many years that I have helped with this activity, it was the BEST weather ever!

    I ran two of CARA’s four weekly weather and ARES/NTS nets.  I was one of ten CARA members who helped with registration, lineup, and communications for the Byesville Halloween Parade.  I, also, attended seven amateur radio meals and participated in a Laurel exam session.

    Remember to be “Radio Active”!


    ’73 Lyn, N8IMW  

    ****************************************************

    CENTRAL OHIO HAPPENINGS
    From: Fritz Tender, WD8E - Assistant Section Manager

    Good Morning All,
     
    We are back to standard time.  Since I am working on 80M band fills I am looking forward to the winter propagation but, not the snow.   
    On a more important note, November marks six years since Frank Piper (KI8GW) selected me to be the Central Ohio Assistant Section Manager.  Frank (KI8GW) I want to thank you for offering me the opportunity to represent the ARRL.  I had fun time.

    Scott, I want to thank you for allowing me to continue as ASM - Central Ohio.  Delaware, Fairfield, Franklin, Knox, Licking, Madison, Marion, Morrow, Pickaway, and Union counties have a lot of clubs and even more Field Day operations.  I attended as many as I could and made many new friends along the way.

    With that in mind I have informed Scott (N8SY) that I will step aside December 31st 2016 at 23:59 UTC.

    If you want to give back to the hobby I encourage you to contact Scott (N8SY).

    See you at an event near you.

    That's all for this month.

    73, Fritz, WD8E

    ****************************************************

    CARBON MONOXIDE (CO) POISONING

    Hi Gang,

    I’m sure that a number of you are asking what the heck is the Section Manager writing about this stuff, it’s not Amateur Radio related!!  Well my friends, you are very mistaken. It’s not only Amateur Radio related, it’s something that as a HAM operator you may not ever have thought about. Where's your ham shack located? In the basement, garage or out building? Most generally ham shacks are not in the living room or main part of the house. As such, heating devices are usually some sort of a supplemental heater/furnace, and that’s why I’m writing about this.

    First, let’s describe what Carbon Monoxide (CO) is. Carbon Monoxide (CO) is the poisonous gases emitted from carbon fueled heat sources (i.e.. gas or fuel oil furnaces, wood burning fire places or stoves, kerosene heaters, propane heaters). I could go on but I think you get the idea. It’s colorless, odorless and it will definitely kill you if you breathe very much of it in. How does this gas kill? It actually migrates into the blood stream and replaces the oxygen in your blood with the Carbon Monoxide. Once it invades your blood stream it will be with you for a very long time, in fact, most of your life! Just ask any firefighter about that. Going into burning buildings without a Self-Contained Breathing Apparatus (SCBA) on will definitely subject you to Carbon Monoxide poisoning, and it takes years and years to get it out of your system, if ever. Sometimes, if consumed in a large enough quantity, you may need a complete blood transfusion to just keep you alive. Yes Virginia, it is that deadly!!

    Why am I writing about this? It’s very personal to me. A number of years ago a very close friend (and his entire family) died in their sleep because they consumed Carbon Monoxide (CO) without knowing it. They lived in an old house on the north side of Mansfield and because it was old, it was drafty with leaks around the doors, windows and the walls didn’t have any insulation in them. We had gotten a cold snap in early November, and back in the middle 1970’s kerosene heaters were all the rage to supplement heat in just this kind of house. Well, with the help of my co-workers we were able to purchase a big kerosene heater to help them through this cold snap. They got the heater all set up and running and all was fine for the first several days, then on the third day the dad came to work complaining of a very bad headache. None of us thought much about it that day and the dad continued his job on the assembly line with the rest of us. The next afternoon we all found out that the heater had been malfunctioning and every member of the family had died of this very dangerous gas.

    I was absolutely torn apart. I had been one of several people at work that help take up the collection to purchase the heater. It took me a long, long time to get over that. Don’t get me wrong, there’s nothing wrong with using these types of supplemental heating sources, but be very careful when you do. At that time CO detectors were truly non-existent for homes, and the ones that were available were for scientific and commercial use and cost hundreds and hundreds of dollars. That’s all changed now. CO detectors are as cheap now as smoke detectors. You can get one for as little as $10 now. That’s an extremely cheap form of protection from this deadly gas.

    Winter is almost here. I don’t know about how it is at your house, but here in the little burg of Lexington, when it gets cold outside, you’ll see the smoke coming out of many chimneys around here. That means that the temperature has dropped to below where it is comfortable. This is the point where the furnaces come on and people start thinking about lighting up the fireplaces and so forth. Now if these devices haven’t been recently serviced, birds can make nests in the chimney’s and like your car, the heat source most likely needs a tune-up to make sure that it’s running efficiently and safely. Having the chimney stuffed up with bird nests or the heat source not burning correctly can cause Carbon Monoxide to accumulate in your house without you even knowing it. That’s where the CO detector comes into play.. Please, please buy one, or two of these really inexpensive CO detectors for your safety and use it! During my trips around the state.  

    By the way, it’s not all about detection either. Do you have a properly rated fire extinguisher within your reach? If not, get one. Learn how to properly use it. It will save you from a lot of damage if you know how to use it properly. Don’t assume that all you do is pull the pin and squeeze the trigger. It’s about knowing how to sweep and aim at the base of the fire. Do yourself a HUGE favor, buy a cheap extinguisher and teach your entire family how to properly use the extinguisher! Yes, even the kids need to know how to use it!

    ****************************************************

    LET'S TALK
    Scott Yonally, N8SY - Section Manager


    Hey Gang,

    Wow..  Did someone leave the refrigerator door open?  It sure has gotten colder out.!!!  It’s with a very heavy heart that I have to report to you that this past week I put my motorcycle up for the winter. Yup, it’s no fun in Mudville for me until next spring when I get it back out and can just be free on two wheels once again!

    ** Now, switching bands to another subject.. **
    I want to thank all the 122 entries from Ohio in the 2016 Field Day. I’m limited in space so I will just congratulate all who participated and took the time over that Saturday and Sunday in June instead of pointing out individuals. There’s been a lot of emails flying around these past several days with more statistics in them than a weather forecast, so for me it’s best to just say “thanks to all.”

    The weather, for the most part cooperated, but unfortunately the bands didn’t. Scores were impressive however. It seemed to me that the big guns had the same changes of doing well as the little guys this year.

    I can tell you with all honesty, I gained 5 pounds on my travels to all 14 Field Day Sites that I went to. One thing that stands out is the fact that we can operate under the worst conditions, AND we like to eat! I want to thank all of you for your graciousness and wonderful hospitality at each of your sites.
     
    ** Now, switching bands to another subject or two.. **
    Have you seen the NEWEST “Handbook Giveaway” drawing on the website yet? It’s there..!! 

    There will be 2 drawings this month, 1 for Thanksgiving and 1 at the end of the month. The first winner will be announced on Thanksgiving day - November 24th and the second one will be announced on December 1st.
    Each winner will be notified by email, so PLEASE use a valid email when completing the form, this is the only way I have of contacting you if you win.

    Hey.. Be sure to enter early. If you enter the drawing BEFORE the November 23rd deadline, you'll automatically be entered for both drawings!!

    To enter the drawing all you need to do is fill in a couple of boxes on the form.. (your name and email). That’s you need to do to be entered into a drawing to win a 2016 ARRL softcover Handbook. There’s nothing else required (Oh.. You do need to be a resident of Ohio to win..)   The winner will be mailed the Handbook at my cost. This is being offered just to see how many folks are really checking in on the website. Got the idea? Best of luck to you!!

    ****************************************************

    Are you getting those emails from me? If not, all you have to do is to “Opt-In” to receive them. Heck, just send me an email   n8sy@n8sy.com   I’ll get you added to the mailing list. There’s a link to do this on the Ohio Section website, it’s on the bottom left corner.. For your convenience, here’s a direct link to it:
    http://arrl-ohio.org/forwarder/forwarding.html  I urge all of you to make sure that everyone, regardless of whether they are a League member or not, get signed up for one of these options. You can always “Opt-Out” at any time if you feel this is not what you were expecting. 

    ** Let’s shift bands once again.. **
    Let’s talk about the Ohio Section Website.. You can find the Ohio Section Website at:http://arrl-ohio.org  If you don’t have this website set as your home page, I urge you to do so. It changes a lot and it’s so important for you to be kept up to date with the very latest information.
     
    ** There’s another NEW – one question – questionnaire on the Ohio Section Website! This question is really important for me to know.. It will only take about 2 seconds for you to answer it, and you can see how your answer stacks up with others instantly. If you haven’t done it yet, please do.. I really want to hear from you.

    Are you a member of the ARRL?? If you aren’t a League member, this is a great opportunity to become one. Want more information on how to join? Here’s the link:http://www.arrl.org/membership-levels. There’s even a 90 day FREE trial that you can apply for if you’ve never been a member.. Got questions about being a member or what the League is all about? Send me an email n8sy@n8sy.com   I’ll be happy to call or write to you. We can even meet and have coffee if you’d like.. and I’ll buy!!

    ** One last spin of the dial.. **
    Lastly..  I’m always available for you, whether you’re an ARRL member or not. If you have any questions, concerns, or would just like to sit and chat awhile over a cup of coffee or something cold to drink, feel free to call or write me   (419) 512-4445 or n8sy@n8sy.com  

    That’s going to do it for this month. I hope to see you all at your hamfests, club meetings or on the air!

    73, Scott, N8SY

    ****************************************************
     
    THE OFFICIAL OBSERVER COORDINATOR
    John Perone, W8RXX

    Here is the October totals...

    Total hours = 805
    Good OO cards sent = 6


    73, John, W8RXX



    ****************************************************

    WEBSITE STATS – ** arrl-ohio.org **

    October 2016

    Pages
    Hits
    Bandwidth
    40,678
    112,672
    2.37 GB

    ****************************************************

    SPECIAL EVENTS STATIONS IN OHIO

    01/28/2017 | 2nd Annual Cabin Fever Special Event
    Jan 28, 1700Z-2300Z, K8PRC
    Loudonville, OH.

    Pedestrian Amateur Radio Club.
    14.250 14.050 7.250 7.050
    QSL. K8PRC, 1661 Manor Ave NW
    Canton, OH 44708

    ****************************************************

    OHIO HAMFEST CALENDAR

    12/03/2016 | Fulton County Winter Fest
    Location: Delta, OH
    Sponsor: Fulton County Amateur Radio Club
    Website:http://k8bxq.org/hamfest

    01/15/2017 | Sunday Creek Amateur Radio Federation Hamfest
    Location: Nelsonville, OH
    Sponsor: Sunday Creek Amateur Radio Federation
    Website: 
    http://www.scarfarc.com

    01/29/2017 | TUSCO Amateur Radio Club Hamfest
    Location: Strasburg, OH
    Sponsor: Tusco Amateur Radio Club
    Website: 
    http://tuscoarc.org
     
    ****************************************************

    A final – final..  Thanksgiving is just a week away and Janie and I do want to express our sincerest THANKS to YOU and YOURS for everything that you have done to make the Ohio Section great!

    As you stuff your face with more food than you could possibly hope to digest in a day, remember those who have and are serving, for it is these folks that make our Thanksgiving possible! 

    Also, please don't forget about those who have far less than what we have. 




    eof..








  9. In this issue:


    -> ARES TRAINING ROSTER

    -> THE LIFE OF A BUREAU LETTER SORTER

    -> ARRL QSL BUREAU COSTS ESCALATING

    -> SUPPORT ARRL BY SHOPPING AT AMAZONSMILE

    -> THE TECHNICAL COORDINATOR

    -> AFFILIATED CLUB COORDINATOR REPORT

    -> NATIONAL PARKS ON THE AIR

    -> THE SECTION EMERGENCY COORDINATOR

    -> THE PUBIC INFORMATION COORDINATOR

    -> FROM THE SCOUTING ASM

    -> THE SECTION TRAFFIC MANAGER

    -> OUT AND ABOUT

    -> CENTRAL OHIO HAPPENINGS

    -> LET'S TALK

    -> THE OFFICIAL OBSERVER COORDINATOR

    -> TRAFFIC NETS TO CHECK-IN TO

    -> OHIO SPEAKERS BUREAU

    -> OHIO AMATEURS IN ACTION

    -> WEBSITE STATS

    -> SPECIAL EVENT STATIONS IN OHIO

    -> OHIO HAMFEST CALENDAR

    ****************************************************

    ARES TRAINING ROSTER
    Jim Yoder, W8ERW/5

    As I continue to log the training ARES members are completing, a few issues have arisen that might have an effect on how the data is reported.  One issue concerns the residence county and the county where the ARES member serves.  As I enter data, I verify via QRZ, the county, call sign for updates and other information for accuracy.  Often when I receive training documents, these items are missing.  I have seen several instances of members serving in other than their home county and when I pull a report for the serving county, they don't show up there, but would in their county of residence.  I have added another field to the data to represent the county where these folks serve.  This should help make the reports represent a more accurate picture of the status of each county ARES participation.  If you have any questions or concerns, please don't hesitate to let me know.

    Also, as time passes, members move or retire from active service, calls are upgraded and changed and we have a key go silent unfortunately.  If this involves your county, let me know and I will update your information.  There is also some churn with regard to EC's and other leadership positions etc.  I will update those if you let me know the details.

    I am also going through all the information that I have which originally came in several formats and am comparing the data for any omissions that can be added or corrected.  I am also adding a lot of training data that had been recorded in previous formats and omitted initially, many times due to the large numbers of miscellaneous courses which in several cases numbered in excess of 100 courses.  My initial effort was to quickly log the FEMA core courses, leaving those others until later.

    For those EC's who would like to see a report of their county, I can provide that upon request.  That would also help insure that we have captured all the information and have not missed training completed by ARES members.

    When you submit your training information, please include the full name and call for each member and your county.  I will verify with QRZ and include any additional data.  Certificates are ideally presented in .pdf format and a FEMA transcript is also acceptable.  Individual certificates should be in the following format:  W8ERW-IS-00100.b.pdf.  As I log each course completion, I enter the course both in the detailed format to capture the version and the generic name, ISC-100.  The course completion date is also entered and a copy of the certificate or transcript is appended to each record.

    As of now, there are 415 members in the database who have submitted training records.  Of those 415, there are 271 who have now completed all 4 of the FEMA courses, ICS-100, ICS-200. ICS-700 and ICS-800.

    Please feel free to contact me if you have any questions or need assistance.

    Thanks & 73,

    Jim W8ERW
    w8erw@arrl.net

    ****************************************************

    THE LIFE OF A BUREAU LETTER SORTER
    By: “Goose” Steingass, W8AV
     
    I am the “R” letter sorter for the 8th Area ARRL Incoming QSL Bureau.  This means that I handle all of the DX QSL cards that come into the bureau whose calls have an “R” as the first letter of their callsign suffix.  I have been doing this for about 7 years now taking over the “R” letter after the previous sorter K8VG became a silent key.  It is a rather daunting task handling cards for over 1000 “R” customers but I have always viewed it as a way of giving back to the hobby that has enriched my life.  Just as a sideline, I am also an avid contester and DXer as well as a DXCC Card Field Checker, so my life is busy.  But, enough of that.  Let’s walk you through what I do as a letter sorter.  By the way all letter sorters are unpaid volunteers, although we do get to use the ARRL’s Outgoing QSL Bureau for our personal cards free of charge.

    About 4 times a year each letter sorter receives bureau cards from the main W8 sorting bureau in West Chester, Ohio.  The cards arrive at the main sorting bureau from overseas and are sorted there by the first letter of the suffix.  The bureau manager, in this case Jack, N8DX, then mails the cards to the respective letter managers (26 in the 8th Area) who then sort the cards by callsign.  With the “R” letter, I usually receive about 15 lbs. of cards in each sort, although the W1AW Centennial QSL cards, I received 24 pounds of cards!  For me this sorting usually takes about two to three days depending on the number of cards.  After the sort, I begin to stuff envelopes to mail the cards to you, the recipient.  Stuffing envelopes normally takes about a week and a half before I can mail the cards.  Each envelope must be weighed to insure that it has sufficient postage on it for mailing.  My “heavy hitters” get a lot of their cards mailed to them in boxes since it is cheaper that addressing and mailing five or six envelopes.

    This might bring up the question on why do I have to address the envelopes?  The answer to this is that many of us sorters operate on a “cash credits” program in which you, the ham, sends the letter manager money and he or she provides the envelopes and postage.  By doing this I can affix a 21 cent stamp to the envelope to cover the second ounce of weight without having to use and additional envelope and 47 cent stamp.  Furthermore, I can buy envelopes in bulk so that I can try to save you money and I do all the leg work of getting envelopes and postage so you don’t have to.  It also alleviates the problem of someone sending me a No.6 envelope (the standard letter sized envelope) which will not hold the larger cards without having to fold them in half or a No. 10 (business letter) envelope with $1.50 of postage on it.  Over the years, I have seen a lot of different sized envelopes with either not enough postage or an 8x10 envelope with one first class stamp on it.  Just a note, an envelope larger than 6x9 cannot be machine processed so the postage rate for these “oversized” envelopes is 92 cents for the first ounce of weight.  This is why I prefer “cash credits”, it prevents this kind  of hassle.  Contact your letter sorter to see if he or she wants envelopes of cash to mail your cards. You can find the list of letter sorters on the Great Lakes Division web site (http://arrl-greatlakes.org/8th_bureau.htm).  If you prefer to deal with envelopes, please use the 6x9 envelopes and put only one first class “forever” stamp on each envelope so you don’t get caught with your pants down when the postage rates increase.

    The worst part of my job is spending extra hours trying to track down hams that have QSL cards on file at the bureau but no funds or envelopes.  This is a tedious process as a lot of them never list their e-mail addresses on QRZ.com and many of them never reply when I try to contact them via e-mail, the NTS, or with a postcard.   There are also others that simply do not want their cards.  Bureau policy is to destroy them after 90 days if there is not response from the ham but some of us keep them for longer periods in our “dead letter” files in case you change your mind and want your cards.  If you work DX, you should have envelopes or funds on file with your letter manager so that the manager does not have to keep trying to find you.  Also, if you move, please let your letter manager know so they can get your cards to you in a timely fashion.  Remember, if you get confirmation for a QSO on LOTW, you may also get a paper card through the bureau.

    One final note, the letter managers do not handle “outgoing” cards.  We simply do not have the time to process both incoming and outgoing cards.  It is your responsibility to mail these to the ARRL if you are a member or to one of the custom QSL services if you are not a member.  There is a processing cost involved for sending outgoing cards it is not a free service.

    Check the ARRL’s website for the current fees.

    ****************************************************

    ARRL QSL BUREAU COSTS ESCALATING

    DX'ers,

    Do you have QSL's to send out to DX Stations via the ARRL Outgoing Bureau?  If you want to beat the big price increase, you should get your Cards to the Bureau before 11/01/16!

    The current typical prices are as follows:
    10 Cards or less = $2.00
    20 Cards or less = $3.00
    21+ Cards = $0.75 per ounce,
      Example: 10 oz. (~100 Cards) = $7.50

    Beginning 11/01/16, these prices will be as follows:
    10 Cards or less = $1.15 + 7.00 Fee = $8.15
    20 Cards or less = $2.30 + 7.00 Fee = $9.30
    21+ Cards = $1.15 per ounce + 7.00 Fee,
      Example: 10 oz. (~100 Cards) = 11.50 + 7.00 = $18.50

    So, as you can see, the price per ounce goes up PLUS there will be an added Fee of $7.00 for each submission. The cost of exchanging physical QSLs is shooting way up! At this rate, the days of the paper QSL Card will be over in the near future.


    GL/73,
      
    Bob  K8BL

    ****************************************************

    SUPPORT ARRL BY SHOPPING AT AMAZONSMILE

    If you already shop on Amazon, or if you’re looking for the perfect gift for a family member or friend, we invite you to shop at smile.amazon.com and choose American Radio Relay League Inc. (ARRL) as your charity of choice. With every purchase you make at AmazonSmile, Amazon will make a contribution to ARRL which allows us to extend our reach in areas of public service, advocacy, education and membership. We hope you will take the opportunity to support ARRL and Amateur Radio with your eligible purchases on smile.amazon.com today!

    Here’s a quick link for you to get signed up: https://smile.amazon.com/ch/06-6000004

    AmazonSmile is the same Amazon you already know, with the same products, prices and service. Visit smile.amazon.com and login to your Amazon account (if you’re new to Amazon, you’ll need to create one).

    ****************************************************

    THE TECHNICAL COORDINATOR
    Jeff Kopcak - TC

    Hey gang,

    Great to see everyone at the Cleveland Hamfest on September 25th.  There was not a cloud in the sky.  As a result, I think more people were out in the flea market selling their wares, which is good.  The inside vendors just weren’t there as in the past.  Last couple years they had a large vendor selling Raspberry Pi computers and accessories.  They were absent this year.  Many clubs and organizations came out and showed their support by setting up tables and selling various junk which others purchased as treasures.

    In an effort to promote Slow-Scan TV, digital modes, and the LEARA digital net, I put together a presentation for The Lake Erie Amateur Radio Association on the topic.  In researching the history, I found and interesting connection to Ohio.  The developer of SSTV, Copthorne Macdonald, specifically mentioned Fair Radio Sales in Lima, Ohio as a place he purchased surplus CRTs and components.  That was a nice surprise!  Slow-Scan was used a lot in early space exploration as there was no effective way to transmit images back to ground stations in the late 1950s early 1960s.  The concept of satellites in space as we know them today was just starting to come around about the same time.

    In talking about SSTV modes and properties, it's great to have some technicals but it doesn't mean much if the audience can't relate - especially if they have not operated that mode.  This applies to any topic.  One idea I included in the presentation was image comparisons.  I took a test pattern type source image and ran it through the loopback feature in MMSSTV.  This eliminated any RF variability.  The source image was compared to the received image in terms of quality and clarity of the mode only.  For one comparison I did use RF.  This was to demonstrate the acoustic interface (where you hold the radio to your computer).  Point being that it is possible to operate digital modes using an acoustic interface but it's clearly not the best option.  Having an interface between the PC and radio is the best option for digital operations.

    The presentation was geared more toward operating SSTV in an informal environment.  I did include a typical exchange and places to look for SSTV activity on the HF bands.  Lastly as part of the meeting, we did Slow Scan TV live – a live demonstration at the meeting!  Well known Ham Radio educator Gordon West – WB6NOA promotes the idea of doing things live and hands on.  I encouraged those who wanted to play along to bring their laptops and radios.  How-to configure and use MMSSTV was shown.  Then pictures were exchanged.  This showed the audience what the application looks like while sending and receiving pictures.  Also the Android SSTV application was available and demoed.  Thanks to Joel K8SHB and Carl KB8VXE for helping out.  The presentation is available on my site:http://www.k8jtk.org/2016/09/27/sstv-images-via-radio-presentations/

    The following weekend on October 1st was the State Emergency Test (SET).  I had been asked to participate as an HF digital station by Cuyahoga County Assistant Emergency Coordinator (AEC) and Technical Specialist Bob K8MD.  I had checked into the Ohio Digital Emergency Net (OHDEN) over the summer.  Watching and learning their procedures during the practice nets, I had knowledge of how to check in and pass traffic.  This goes back to something I mentioned last month: regularly participating in nets and public service events not only shows you're active but you'll be familiar with the responsibilities you’ll be assigned.

    That's about it for this month.  I'll be working to get projects wrapped up and take care of end of the year requirements for clubs in the area. 


    Thanks for reading and 73… 
    de Jeff – K8JTK

    ****************************************************

    THE AFFILIATED CLUBS COORDINATOR
    John Myers, KD8MQ - ACC

    Hi everyone,

    Statistics - Since I can remember, statistics have interested me. In 1987, I began doing a breakdown of the PA QSO Party results to per-county numbers, to help those of us who enjoy activating rare counties. Now, almost 30 years later, I’m still enjoying it.

    Each month, I download the latest Section club numbers from the ARRL website, to keep tabs on who is renewing their affiliations, and SSCs, and who probably needs an e-mail, or visit from me. Overall, I’ve been pretty pleased with what I’ve seen over the last two years. As I’ve heard Scott say on occasion, the Ohio section is one of the most populous of the ARRL sections. According to the form letter I recently sent to my senators, we have over 27,000 Licensed Hams in the Ohio section.

    As of the most recent numbers I’ve seen, we have 105 clubs in the Ohio Section, and 26 of them are Special service Clubs. That’s not pretty good; it’s awesome! Let’s look at a national level. As of August, we had 2401 clubs in the database, and 162 Special Service Clubs. So, 162 SSCs nationwide, and 26 of them in Ohio! And we could have more SSCs. Pretty much all of the clubs in the section are doing everything that is required of Special Service Clubs, and then some. From there, it’s just filling out the paperwork.

    In reviewing an application last week, I noticed one club that repurposes their old issues of QST, by distributing them to various locations, such as Doctors’ Offices. The address label area would be a great place to put a sticker giving a shout to your club. Maybe it could steer readers to your website, or Facebook page. The label is one of the ideas I read in Scott, W9WSW’s post which I plugged last month.

    IVY+ Amateur Radio Campaign - A few days ago, something came over the ARRL News feed which caught my attention. The story “ARRL Acting as Catalyst in College Radio Club Revitalization Campaign” tells about a campaign to revitalize the nation’s college amateur Radio clubs. Though the name of the initiative is “IVY+ Amateur Radio”, this is by no means limited to just Ivy League schools.

    If your club is looking for another project to get involved, maybe Partnering with a local college or university is something you can take a look at. You can read more about the IVY+ initiative athttp://tinyurl.com/gmumw4t



    On that subject, last month, I gave a shout to a blog post by Scott, W9WSW entitled “Re-vitalizing Your College Ham Club”.  As I said then, not all of his bullet points work for every situation.  But I like a lot of what I was reading in this post. You can read it atw9wsw.com/?p=950.

    Election Time – Of course with the changing of the seasons comes something else; club elections for some of us. I’d like to pass along this reminder to you outgoing officers. Please remind your replacement to update the club information. This is easily done, and makes my job a lot easier when I need to contact the club. The club record at the league is easier to update than ever before. If you have any questions, or difficulties with the update, please drop me an e-mail and I’ll do my best to help.

    And with that, I’ll tie the ribbons on it for another month. 


    73, until next month.

    DE KD8MQ

    ****************************************************

    NATIONAL PARKS ON THE AIR
    John Myers, KD8MQ - ACC

    Well, according to the NPOTA website, we are over the 725,000 QSO mark, with over 13,500 activations under our belts. There’s still plenty of good weather ahead. The Alliance club can add their name to the list of clubs who’ve activated NP14 (Cuyahoga Valley National Park). An activation of NS16 (First ladies Library) is in the planning stages as well.

    October 15th is the anniversary of NPOTA, I know, not the actual Anniversary, but the October 15th, 2015 issue of the ARRL Letter listed first mention of this interesting operating event that we now know as NPOTA.

    The following was posted recently by Sean, KX9X on the NPOTA Facebook page: “Norm Fusaro and I have been presented evidence that the Carl Hayden Visitor Center at the Glen Canyon National Recreation Area (RC10) also serves as the Visitor Center for Rainbow Bridge National Monument (MN63). We agree with the information presented; operations from September 29 onward from the Carl Hayden Visitor Center will count for MN63”.

    Sean goes on to clarify that only the Carl Hayden visitor Center will count for MN63, since the Monument itself is marked as Amateur Radio prohibited.

    And, while we are on the subject, Sean posted a few days ago that the Visitor Center at Christiansted National Historic Site in the Virgin Islands (NS10) also acts in an official capacity for the Buck Island Reef National Monument (MN08). 

    Lastly, if you are reading the web copy of the Section Journal, here are the Ohio NPOTA top five activators, and chasers. You can also read this atnpota.arrl.org.






















    That’s it for this month folks. Don’t forget to have some fun out there!


    73,
    John, KD8MQ

    ****************************************************

    THE SECTION EMERGENCY COORDINATOR
    Stan Broadway, N8BHL

    We pause our normal program for these ~real~ emergencies

    Don’t look so surprised. Amateur radio is back and in high demand for real life, high profile, actual, bona-fide, holy-crap-lookee-there emergency situations all over the country.

    There are (always, it seems) articles regularly outlining exercises staged for amateur radio operators. And there are (once in a while) accounts of amateur radio actually being of value in those wild-west wildfires. But this year, across the board and across the country, amateur radio operators were doing their stuff at the highest levels. I should hope you’re aware of the groundbreaking work amateurs did during the Republican National Convention in Cleveland and across the state during July. (If you want to read about it, I highly recommend the October edition of CQ magazine, available at Universal Service!) That was only a start.

    Amateur radio was active during extreme flooding across the southern states.  A major power outage affecting nearly all of Puerto Rico left amateur radio (when all else fails…) at the forefront.

    More recently amateur operators in a number of states were called upon as a historic hurricane Matthew bore down on Florida- threatening the east coast as it hasn’t been threatened in eleven years. Hurricane Matthew made landfall four times, in four different countries. One of the worst reports came from Haiti, where nearly 300 were dead, and the headlines read, “Less than 1% of houses remain in Haiti.”  Like several other states, the entire state ARES of Florida was activated as governments warned people to run for their lives. Multiple shelters were opened in affected counties, and ARES nets were running.  The VOIP Hurricane Net and the original Hurricane Watch Net (of which I am a member and on the board) were operational from the initial threat. The HWN smashed all previous records in several different categories- dedicating 24 hour nets, longest operational period stretching almost 7 days, longest concurrent net operation (20/40 meters).  Reports varied from, “no damage, moderate wind but a lot of rain” to C6AGG’s “First floor flooded, second floor wind-driven rain, entire region is devastated and mostly flattened,” at New Providence Island, Bahamas.  While the storm politely glanced off the east coast and avoided the dire “Everybody’s gonna die!” warnings it was still major. Important to this discussion, there was no hesitation on the part of officials to activate their ARES partners. Why? Simple truth: it ~will~ work when the rest fails.

    This goes way beyond just cheerleading for ARES. This is all about amateur radio as a lifesaving, integral part of a wide region, or entire island nation’s ability to protect its residents by providing information before, and communication after a major disaster. 

    And one insidious characteristic creeping into our hobby can kill all the gains we’ve made: lethargy. “Let somebody else do it”…”I’m really burned out on it”...~crickets~ instead of responding.  If we don’t do it, there’s nobody left!  We old heads who’ve been through it a couple times are the most valuable element of ARES, and if we sit back to “let the young guys do it” we quickly rob them of experienced teachers who can Elmer, and we may find that there are no young guys out there anymore.

    All through Matthew, I talked with operators who were under stress: no power, damaged homes, many other concerns beyond radio. Yet they were adept at putting a radio on the air, re-hanging destroyed antennas, and patching their stations to provide help to their community. Many who were providing reports to the Hurricane Watch Net were simultaneously operating on their local ARES nets. Some were on their way to shelters to operate with the Red Cross.  When the call went out and the warnings were issued- the stood up, got busy, and got it done after putting in the time and effort to be prepared and ready. They had participated in exercises, trained at regular meetings, and worked with local agencies.  Will you?

    For the latest Section Emergency Coordinator’s monthly report go to:


    73, Stan, N8BHL

    ****************************************************

    THE PUBLIC INFORMATION COORDINATOR
    John Ross, KD8IDJ

    Hey Gang,

    Just wanted to remind everyone that the 2017 ARRL Ohio Section Newsletter contest will be soon starting back up once again.

    Entering the contest is simple, just make sure that you include me and Scott, N8SY on your club mailing and you will be automatically entered. That’s all there is to it. You do have both of us included don’t you?

    Anyway, if you don’t, please make that your next priority and get it done. We want everyone that produces a newsletter, whether in hard copy or electronic to be entered. Everyone has a great chance of winning for sure.

    That's  all for this month...73


    John, KD8IDJ

    ****************************************************

    FROM THE SCOUTING ASM
    Scott Hixon, KC8ITN

    By the time you read this, the 59th annual “Jamboree on the Air (JOTA)” will be history. This is always a great time to introduce scouts to ham radio. With JOTA events going on all across the country and around the world, it is almost guaranteed that scouts at your event will be able to talk to other scouts.

    Even though JOTA is over, that doesn’t mean that our work to promote amateur radio to the next generation is done until next year’s JOTA. Look at it as the beginning of a new season of amateur radio fun.  Like I’ve said before, there are scouting events and campouts throughout the year. Cold weather campouts are among my favorite. There’s nothing like hearing the crackle of a fire while listening to the crackle of the speaker when the radio is turned on!

    While I’m on the subject of Jamboree on the Air, I would like to mention a radio manufacturer that has been doing a lot over the last few years for the Radio Scouting program. They have literally helped put amateur radio in front of thousands of scouts with their generosity and assistance.  The following paragraph was taken from the k2bsa.net website:   “In May 2012 at the Dayton Hamvention, Icom America and the Boy Scouts of America announced a sponsorship agreement for the K2BSA operation at the 2013 National Scout Jamboree. Icom is the exclusive amateur radio transceiver and repeater sponsor for the Jamboree. In addition, Icom America is sponsoring an amateur radio station loan program for local Boy Scout councils beginning this year. In October 2015, Icom and Boy Scouts of America announced a renewal of the sponsorship agreement and the associated programs through 2018. This includes providing transceivers for the 2017 National Jamboree.You can find the 2015 press release from theBSA at Icom America Continues Amateur Radio Support for Boy Scouts of America.”  For a manufacturer to step up like this to help the scouting program (and the next generation of ham operators) says a lot!

    The end of the year is coming up. Have you been tracking the hours you spend showing scouts how fun ham radio is? Don’t forget about the “contest” I have going. There will be an award for the individual and the group that puts in the most hours getting scouts on the air in 2016! Just email me the hours you or your group put in during the 2016 year. The deadline for submissions is January 15th, 2017. Good luck!!


    73, Scott, KC8ITN

    ****************************************************

    THE SECTION TRAFFIC MANAGER
    David Maynard, WA3EZN - STM

    SET 2016 for Ohio has been completed however the European SET continues for the rest of the month. The Central Ohio Traffic Net and some others will continue to receive SET test messages for the entire month of October.  At least one of the OSSBN nets ran for three hours of more.  It appeared that there was a fair quantity of traffic passed.  If you didn't participate or originate traffic you missed an opportunity to make Ohio really shine. 

    Each net and section is to report there activity to the ARRL using forms on the ARRL website.  The activity reports will be analyzed and a report will be issued later as sort of a grade for each section.  These forms for SET can be found athttp://www.arrl.org/public-service-field-services-forms

    Here is a list of Ohio NTS HF daily nets, frequencies, times and net managers.  All licensed hams are welcome to check in with or without radiogram traffic.

    BN(E)             Buckeye Net Early – CW –  WB8YLO NET MANAGER – 3580 at 6:45
    BN(L)             Buckeye Net Late  – CW –  WB9LBI NET MANAGER –   3590 at 10:00 pm
    OSN                Ohio Slow Net        – CW –  W8OLO NET MANAGER –   3.53535 at 6PM
    OSSBN           Ohio Single Sideband Net – Phone – KC8WH NET MANAGER –
                            3972.5 at 10:30 AM, 4:15PM AND 6:45 PM

    The OSSBN meets three times daily to handle traffic. Notice that there are three CW nets meeting daily to handle traffic. I decided to try to listen to the OSN to see what it was like.  To my surprise I was still able to recognize some of the characters after many years without using Morse code. However I didn't remember enough to chime in with my call and join the net. Then I got thinking is there really a reason we should be using CW when we have voice privileges on the HF bands.

    Why Morse Code?
    If you can talk FM on two meters, or SSB on HF, why should you be concerned at all about Morse Code, also known as CW.

    However, there are good reasons why you should learn Morse code. Having a level of Morse proficiency that is of real use on the air, meaning that you can copy at 12-13 wpm or more, will add immeasurably to your enjoyment of Amateur Radio.  Such rewarding HF activities as DXing, contesting and QRP operating still rely heavily on CW. Thousands of hams enjoy CW for its own appeal as a relaxing mode different from most other means of communication. And even on VHF and higher frequencies, you'll find that exciting activities such as Moon-bounce and weak-signal work still require Morse skills for full participation.  Every day is a good day to operate on CW, but set some time aside on New Year’s Eve and Day to enjoyStraight Key Night (SKN). The annual event gets under way a 0000 UTC on January 1, 2016 (New Year’s Eve in US time zones). The 24 hour event is not a contest but a day dedicated to celebrating our CW heritage.

    Many newcomers exploring ham radio were discouraged by the need to learn Morse code. In the United States, that requirement to know Morse code to get an amateur radio license was dropped in 1991, and completely removed in 2007.

    Morse code used to be required as an entry requirement to HF ham communications. The entry level speed was 5 words per minute (WPM). That speed is slow enough to learn the basics, get on the air, and increase your speed through practice. Yes, I started as a Novice way back at 5 WPM, and could copy about 13 WPM to get my General license.

    I thought I'd want to get enough code speed to get on SSB voice. I did that, but discovered something I didn't expect. Sometimes, the band was so poor that I couldn't hear a single voice station on SSB. But, when I tuned down to the Morse code CW portion of the band, lo and behold, there were CW contacts going on.

    I learned that Morse code needs only about a tenth of the power of SSB to make a contact. Or, stated another way, if you use Morse code, it's like getting an amplifier for your transmitter for free! We all know that there are days you'd be desperate for a contact with SSB, and it appears that you can make contacts with Morse code!

    In the early days if you lived in Ohio and wanted to test for a ham license you went to an FCC office in Cleveland or Detroit. The test I took for my general was given in an office setting with phone ringing and office type activity all around me. Since those early days the FCC decided to use Volunteer Examiners to do their testing.  This provided a more quiet and relaxed atmosphere to take the test especially after the FCC dropped the code test requirements

    If you didn't have a buddy to learn code with you had to use records like the Ameco code course like I did.  You supplemented you record course by copying W1AW code transmissions over the air. At that time it was common to count dots and dashed and mentally convert them to letters to write on paper.

    Since then it has become commonly known that the best was to learn code was not to count dots and dashes but to learn the sound of each individual letter.  Also available today are a multitude of websites, clubs and computer programs to use to learn the code the proper way.

    Why not slower than 15 words per minute?

    Because at a somewhat slower speed you can count the individual dots and dashes rather than having your brain treat each character as a distinct, integrated sound pattern.When you hear Morse code sent at 5 wpm for learning such a slow speed is counterproductive. You don't learn the soundsthat lead to instantaneous recognition. And, far worse, it programs the brain to count individual dots and dashes — precisely what you don’t want it to do! This eventually has to be unlearned and presents a formidable barrier to actually learning useful code.

    To some degree, previous government regulations are to blame: In earlier times the FCC imposed a Morse code requirement of 5 wpm for the Novice Class amateur radio license, causing legions of radio amateurs to get on precisely the wrong track. And to this day there are well-intentioned individuals, clubs, and organizations that recommend starting at 5 wpm!

    You should start on your road to success by throwing some time-honored ham-radio traditions onto the window where they belong. These are:
     
    Slow (5 wpm) code -- It ought to be illegal to teach anyone code at 5 wpm. Every minute spent toying with 5wpm code is irrevocably wasted. In addition, as we'll see later, starting with slow code is a virtually-guaranteed path to frustration and quitting. Morse at 5 wpm and Morse at 15 or 20 wpm are completely different critters, and you don't want to waste time on the wrong one.

    Charts, mnemonics, musical cues and other "memory aids" -- These things make you think about what you're doing while trying to copy code. That is deadly to proficient copying.
    Code tapes -- In very short order, and unconsciously, you'll memorize the tape. This will lull you into false confidence in your ability. That false confidence will be quickly shattered when you hear transmitted text that you haven't memorized.

    Copying QSOs off the air -- You don't know the speed of code you find on the bands, and much code on the air is pretty badly sent. All this makes it useless for training purposes. Formal code-practice sessions, such as those on W1AW, are OK, however.

    Now that you know what you’re not going to do, let's start examining just how you can best gain code proficiency.

    There are hundreds if not thousands of websites available about Morse code. To get you started below here are a few of the websites with information and programs to help you get started on you adventure into the world of Morse code.  Remember that you are not going to count dot and dashes a 5 WPM but you are going to want to start at a higher speed and learn the sounds.




    Daily Morse Code Practice QST Source

    K6RAU Code Course






    If you start now you can be ready for Straight Key Night in January.  You could also be ready for that next CW DX contest. Check back next month for more information

    Until next time remember without training you are not a part of the solution, you are part of the problem.

    For the latest Section Traffic Monthly Report go to:  http://arrl-ohio.org/stm/stm.html


    73, David, WA3EZN

    ****************************************************

    OUT AND ABOUT
    Lyn Alfman, N8IMW - Assistant Section Manager

    This is my favorite time of the year—cool, crisp, and colorful autumn!  September flew by especially fast, probably because I was busy having fun.  My OM, Sonny, W8FHF, and I took in several festivals when we were not involved in local radio activities.

     I was part of the W8VP team that operated from Blue Rock State Park during the Ohio State Parks on the Air (OSPOTA) contest.  We made 73 contacts and talked to 32 state parks.  I also was part of the W8VP crew that put the North Country National Scenic Trail on the air from Salt Fork State Park the next weekend. We made 233 contacts that day from Iowa, Minnesota, Arkansas and all points east and north into Ontario on a 40-meter dipole up about 15 to 20 feet high at the edge of a corn field.  What a blast!  

    I attended two CARA museum planning meetings, eight amateur radio group meals, a Christmas parade committee meeting, two club meetings, an antenna work party, and ran a weather and ARES/NTS net. 

    CARA president Bruce Homer, N8JMK, who is also an Assistant Emergency Coordinator for the Guernsey County ARES group, attended the ARES Conference in Marion.

    As Public Information Officer, I placed meeting announcements in the newspaper, on the radio as well as their websites, and had two articles published in the local newspaper. 

    October looks to be just as busy since several events have already scheduled, starting with the Simulated Emergency Test drill.   


    ’73 Lyn, N8IMW  

    Remember to be Radio Active!

    ****************************************************

    CENTRAL OHIO HAPPENINGS
    From: Fritz Tender, WD8E - Assistant Section Manager

    First, as I write this I must report that our furnace kicked on the last few mornings.  Although fall is my favorite time of year winter is not.  Oh well find the snow shovel and hope for the best.

    I am looking forward to the CQ WW SSB contest the end of October.  I will be tuning 80 and 160 meter looking for band fills.  Let’s hope propagation improves.

    Second, the XYL (Billie N8LEL) recently underwent a tri-level cervical fusion and is currently house bound which is restricting my travel.  I did manage to make a short visit to Ohio ARES Conference.  The facilities were great, turnout was very good, and the program top notch.  Thumbs up to Stan (N8BHL).

    That's all for this month.

    73, Fritz, WD8E

    ****************************************************

    LET'S TALK
    Scott Yonally, N8SY - Section Manager

    Hey Gang,

    Wow..  Did someone leave the refrigerator door open?  It sure has gotten colder out.!!!

    I want to remind everyone that you’ll find the story about the RNC / NAACP Conventions in the NEAREST OCTOBER ISSUE OF CQ MAGAZINE!  We got 5 full pages of coverage!  Nice work everybody!!

    ** Now, switching bands to another subject.. **



    Have you seen the NEWEST Handbook Giveaway” drawing on the website yet? It’s there..!! To enter the drawing all you need to do is fill in a couple of boxes on the form.. (your name and email). That’s you need to do to be entered into a drawing to win a 2016 ARRL softcover Handbook. There’s nothing else required (Oh.. You do need to be a resident of Ohio to win..)   The winner will be mailed the Handbook at my cost. This is being offered just to see how many folks are really checking in on the website. Got the idea? Best of luck to you!!




    Are you getting those emails from me? If not, all you have to do is to “Opt-In” to receive them.

    Heck, just send me an email  n8sy@n8sy.com   I’ll get you added to the mailing list. There’s a link to do this on the Ohio Section website, it’s on the bottom left corner.. For your convenience, here’s a direct link to it:  http://arrl-ohio.org/forwarder/forwarding.html  I urge all of you to make sure that everyone, regardless of whether they are a League member or not, get signed up for one of these options. You can always “Opt-Out” at any time if you feel this is not what you were expecting. 

    ** Let’s shift bands once again.. **
    Let’s talk about the Ohio Section Website.. You can find the Ohio Section Website at: http://arrl-ohio.org  If you don’t have this website set as your home page, I urge you to do so. It changes a lot and it’s so important for you to be kept up to date with the very latest information.

    ** There’s another NEW – one question – questionnaire on the Ohio Section Website! This question is really important for me to know.. It will only take about 2 seconds for you to answer it, and you can see how your answer stacks up with others instantly. If you haven’t done it yet, please do.. I really want to hear from you.

    Are you a member of the ARRL?? If you aren’t a League member, this is a great opportunity to become one. Want more information on how to join? Here’s the link:http://www.arrl.org/membership-levels. There’s even a 90 day FREE trial that you can apply for if you’ve never been a member.. Got questions about being a member or what the League is all about? Send me an email  n8sy@n8sy.com   I’ll be happy to call or write to you. We can even meet and have coffee if you’d like.. and I’ll buy!!

    ** One last spin of the dial.. **
    Lastly..  I’m always available for you, whether you’re an ARRL member or not. If you have any questions, concerns, or would just like to sit and chat awhile over a cup of coffee or something cold to drink, feel free to call or write me   (419) 512-4445 or  n8sy@n8sy.com   

    That’s going to do it for this month. I hope to see you all at your hamfests, club meetings or on the air!

    73, Scott, N8SY

    ****************************************************

    THE OFFICIAL OBSERVER COORDINATOR

    John Perone, W8RXX




    Here are the Ohio OO totals...

    OO cards sent = 2

    Total hours monitored = 807


    73, John, W8RXX

    ****************************************************

    WEBSITE STATS – ** arrl-ohio.org **

    September 2016

    Pages
    Hits
    Bandwidth
    34,803
    213,539
    2.50 GB

    ****************************************************

    TRAFFIC NETS TO CHECK-IN TO

    Ohio Local Nets

    Burning River Traffic Net (BRTN), 9:30 PM daily, 147.150 MHz, W8DJG manager    http://www.qsl.net/brtn/

    Central Ohio Traffic Net (COTN), 7:15 PM (19:15), daily,  146.970 MHz (Columbus RPTR), KD8TTE manager  http://www.cotn.us/

    Miami Valley Traffic Net (MVTN), 7:00 PM Mon, Thurs, Sat, 146.640 MHz,  KC8HTP manager 

    Northwest Ohio ARES Net (NWOHARES), 6:30 PM, daily, 146.610 MHz, PL 103.5, N8TNV manager  

    Tri-County Traffic Training Net (TCTTN), 9:00 PM Sun, Tues, Fri, 147.015 MHz, KI8U manager   http://tricountytraffic.net/

    Tri-State Amateur Traffic Net (TATN), 8:00 PM daily, 146.670 MHz, PL 123.0, WG8Z manager        http://www.tatn.org/

    ** Ohio Section Nets **

    SSB
    Ohio Single Sideband Net (OSSBN), 10:30 AM, 4:15 PM and 6:45 PM daily, 3.972.50 MHz, KC8WH manager   http://ossbn.org/

    CW
    Buckeye Net (Early), BN-E, 6:45 PM daily, 3.580 MHz, WB8YLO manager

    Buckeye Net (Late), BN-L, 10:00 PM daily, 3.590 MHz, WB9LBI manager
         
    Ohio Slow Net (OSN), 6:00 PM daily, 3.53535 MHz, W8OLO manager

    For the latest Section Traffic Monthly Report go to: http://arrl-ohio.org/stm/stm.html

    **DMR**

    First and Third Wednesday of the month at 8:30pm local on the Ohio statewide Talk Group

    Every Thursday at 8:00pm local on the Kentucky statewide Talk Group

    ****************************************************

    OHIO SPEAKERS BUREAU

    Tom Sly, WB8LCD is continuing to collect information on club presentations and is always on the look-out for speakers that are willing to help out and do their presentations for clubs around the Ohio Section.

    You don't necessarily have to travel. With the technology of today, you could easily do a webinar, Google Hangouts, or Skype presentation right from the comforts of your own shack. Bob Heil, K9EID does this all the time! You might be surprised just how easy this really is now days.

    If you've had or conducted an interesting presentation at a club meeting in the last 12 months, please send an email to Tom.  He would like to know:

    1) The topic or the name of the presentation,

    2) The name and call sign of the presenter,

    3) The name and location of the club,

    4) Do clubs usually have interesting presentations (Y/N),

    5) Has your club ever had a presentation done over Skype or some other internet service?


    Tom stresses that he would like this information from all club members - not just club officers!  You can email Tom at:tomsly29@gmail.com

    Your participation in this program will benefit all the clubs in the Ohio Section.

    Our goal is to see this list grow. The more presenters we have on the list, the more interesting your club meetings will be.

    ****************************************************

    OHIO AMATEURS IN ACTION

    Hey Gang..  It was suggested that we have a photo gallery of our Ohio Amateurs in action. So, we now have a photo gallery just for this.. You can find it at:  
    http://arrl-ohio.org/action_pics/action.html  as well as there is a link to this page right from the main page of the Ohio Section website..

    These pictures can include any special event, activity and so forth that your ARES or Club has done.. I’m sure you get the idea. Send your pictures to me at:  n8sy@n8sy.com  and include a brief explanation of the event and I’ll get the pictures added to the gallery..

    I’ve already got a number of pictures up there, let’s fill up the Gallery with lots more..

     I’m looking for great new pictures that I might be able to use in the next Ohio Section Banner, so make sure that you get your pictures to me.. I want a great representation of ALL of the Ohio Section.

    ****************************************************

    SPECIAL EVENTS STATIONS IN OHIO


    11/05/2016 | 175th Anniversary of Cambridge City Band

    Nov 5, 1300Z-2100Z, W8VP, Cambridge, OH.
    Cambridge Amateur Radio Association. 7.235.

    Certificate. CARA, PO Box 1804, Cambridge, OH 43725.

    This is a celebration of the 175th anniversary of the oldest
    continuous community band in Ohio--the Cambridge City Band.

    Send SASE (9" x 12" with $1 postage) to
    CARA
    P. O. Box 1804
    Cambridge, OH 43725

    *-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-

    TO:  Region AF MARS Directors
    RE:  MARS Information Release  COMEX 16-4 Information
    Please disseminate downward to all AF MARS Members and to Amateur Radio lists and service organizations

    Subject:  Military Auxiliary Radio System to Conduct Interoperability Exercise with Amateur Radio Community, COMEX 16-4

    From 30 October through 1 November, members of the Military Auxiliary Radio System (both branches)will be conducting a quarterly Department of Defense Contingency Communications exercise. The purpose of this quarterly exercise is train on our ability to provide communications following a very bad day scenario when traditional forms of communications will likely be unavailable. While the simultaneous loss of all communications nation-wide is not likely, for training purposes, we are assuming there has been a massive nation-wide outage.

    One of the objectives of this exercise is to continue the partnership with the amateur radio community to help provide information about local conditions and send this information to the Department of Defense to help understand what is happening around the United States.  During this exercise, we will use 60 meters, local VHF and UHF repeaters as well as HF NVIS amateur radio bands. Our goal is to have a conversation about the local conditions in and around your county. During the conversation, our operators will be asking basic questions such as the status of commercial power, public water systems, and road conditions. These will be person to person conversations you don t need to use any digital modes or know any special messaging formats. 

    To kick off this exercise, we are encouraging the amateur radio community to monitor 5,330.5KHz from 0300-0400 Hrs Zulu on 31 October. During this hour, we will be doing a high power voice broadcast from a military station on the east coast and alternate with a voice broadcast from the west coast. Amateur radio operators are encouraged to submit a reception report as indicated in the voice broadcast. 

    For the remainder of the exercise, MARS personnel will be calling for amateur radio operators on the 60 meter channels as well as using already established amateur radio nets on HF NVIS and VHF/UHF repeaters.  Amateur radio operators are also invited to attend the ARRL webinar scheduled for 25 Oct at 2000 hrs eastern time where Dave Stapchuk, Chief AF MARS, and the Army MARS Program Manager will give a presentation about the MARS program. 

    If you have further questions about this exercise, please email: mars.exercises@gmail.com .

    Jodie Rouse
    Region Seven Public Affairs Officer
    Missouri State Director
    Army MARS

    If you have further questions about this exercise, please email: mars.exercises@gmail.com .

    Jodie Rouse
    Region Seven Public Affairs Officer
    Missouri State Director
    Army MARS

    ****************************************************

    OHIO HAMFEST CALENDAR

    10/23/2016 | Massillon ARC Hamfest
    Location: Massillon, OH
    Sponsor: Massillon Amateur Radio Club

    *-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-

    11/05/2016 | GARC Hamfest
    Location: Georgetown, OH
    Sponsor: Grant Amateur Radio Club

    *-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-

    12/03/2016 | Fulton County Winter Fest
    Location: Delta, OH
    Sponsor: Fulton County Amateur Radio Club

    ****************************************************


    eof..




  10. In this issue:

    -> AMATEUR RADIO PARITY ACT PASSES THE HOUSE

    -> THE TECHNICAL COORDINATOR

    -> AFFILIATED CLUB COORDINATOR REPORT

    -> NATIONAL PARKS ON THE AIR

    -> THE SECTION EMERGENCY COORDINATOR

    -> THE PUBIC INFORMATION COORDINATOR

    -> THE SECTION TRAFFIC MANAGER

    -> THE STATE GOVERNMENT LIAISON

    -> OUT AND ABOUT

    -> WHATS HAPPENING IN SOUTHWEST OHIO

    -> CENTRAL OHIO HAPPENINGS

    -> LET'S TALK

    -> THE OFFICIAL OBSERVER COORDINATOR

    -> WEBSITE STATS

    -> SPECIAL EVENT STATIONS IN OHIO

    -> OHIO HAMFEST CALENDAR

    ****************************************************

    AMATEUR RADIO PARITY ACT PASSES THE HOUSE
    From the ARRL

    Dear ARRL member,

    I am writing to you today because we